201 illustrations of birds including: macaw, maculta, magpie, mallard, man-of-war, martin, meadow-lark, menura, merganser, merlin, mina, mino-bird, mockingbird, momot, moor-hen, moorfowl, mooruk, mound-bird, mourning dove, natatores, night-jar, nighthawk, noddy tern, notornis mantelli, nut cracker, nuthatch, oriole, ortolan, osprey, ostrich, oven bird, owl, and oyster catcher

The Northern Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) is an owl in the Strigidae family of true owls.

Northern Pygmy Owl

The Northern Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium gnoma) is an owl in the Strigidae family of true owls.

"The owl is a popular name for any nocturnal, raptorial bird, of which about 200 species are known. Their classification is in a very unsettled state. Willoughby's division into two sections– one having 'ears' or 'horns,' as the tufts of feathers on their heads were called, the other destitute of such appendages– was shown to be unnatural by Geoffroy St. Hilaire. The prevailing color of the plumage is brown, with a tinge of rusty-red, and it is exceedingly loose and soft, so that their flight (even in the larger species) is almost noiseless, enabling them to swoop upon their prey, which they hunt in the twilight. All owls cast up in the form of pellets the indigestible parts of the food swallowed. These castings may be seen under any owl-roost, and show plainly the great service these birds render to man in destroying rats and mice. They range over the whole globe."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Rock Owl

"The owl is a popular name for any nocturnal, raptorial bird, of which about 200 species are known.…

The scops-eared owl is diminutive in size, not exceeding that of the thrush, (Figuier, 1869).

Scops-Eared Owl

The scops-eared owl is diminutive in size, not exceeding that of the thrush, (Figuier, 1869).

The scops-eared owl is diminutive in size, not exceeding that of the thrush, (Figuier, 1869).

Scops-Eared Owl

The scops-eared owl is diminutive in size, not exceeding that of the thrush, (Figuier, 1869).

A scops-eared owl feeding on a small rodent. It is common in Central and Southern Europe.

Scops-Eared Owl

A scops-eared owl feeding on a small rodent. It is common in Central and Southern Europe.

Strix flammea, the nocturnal White Screech-, or Barn Owl, is orange-buff above, with brown, grey and white markings, but is white below and on the complete facial discs. The dark grey phase has white parts tinged with orange and a few distinct blackish spots beneath. The legs are entirely, and the toes partially, covered with bristly feathers." A. H. Evens, 1900

Screech Owl

Strix flammea, the nocturnal White Screech-, or Barn Owl, is orange-buff above, with brown, grey and…

Scops. Little Horned Owls. Screech Owls. Like the miniature Bubo in form (all our species under a foot long). Skull and ear-parts symmetrical; latter small, simply elliptical, with rudimentry operculum; facial disc moderately developed; plumicorns evident; nostrils at edge of cere, which is not inflated, and shorter than the rest of the culmen. Wings rounded, but long, about twice the length of the short rounded tail, about to the end which they fold; in our species the 4th and 5th primaries longest, the 1st quite short; 3 or 4 outer primaries sinuate or emarginate on inner webs. Tarsus feathered (in our species), but toes only partly bristly (in the S. asio group) or quite naked (as in S. Flammeola). Plumage dichromatic in some cases; i.e. some individuals of the same species normally mottled gray, while others are reddish, the two phases very distinct when fully developed, but shading insensibly into each other, and entirely independent of age, season, or sex. In normal plumage, a white or whitish scapular stripe; lower parts with lengthwise blotches or shaft-lines and crosswise bars or waves of blackish or dark colors; upper parts with black or blackish shaft-lines on a finely-dappled brown or gray ground (more or less obliterated in the red phase); facial disc black-bordered nearly all around; wing-quills spotted or marbled on outer webs, barred on inner webs. Tail with light and dark bars. A large and nearly cosmopolitan genus, especially rich in tropical species; but only two are known to inhabit N. Am. one of them running into several local races very difficult to characterize satisfactorily." Elliot Coues, 1884

Screech Owl

Scops. Little Horned Owls. Screech Owls. Like the miniature Bubo in form (all our species under a foot…

"Asio accipitrinus. Short-eared Owl. Marsh Owl. Ear-tufts inconspicuous, much shorter than middle toe and claw, few-feathered. First and 2d primaries emarginate on inner webs. Above, completely variegated, chiefly in streaks, with fulvous or tawny, and dark brown; breast much the same, but other under parts paler ochrey, usually bleaching on the belly, which in sparely but sharply streaked (never barred) with dark brown; feet pale tawny or whitish, usually immaculate; lining of wings interruptedly whitish. Wing-quills varied, mostly in large pattern, and tail pretty regularly barred (about 5 bars) with the two colors of the upper parts. Facial area white or nearly so, but with a large black eye-patch; the disc minutely speckled with fulvous and blackish, bordered with white internally and usually having a blackish patch behind the ear; radiating feathers of the oper-culum streaked with blackish and fulvous. Iris bright yellow; bill and claws dusky-bluish; the naked granular soles yellowish. The ear-opening of this species is extremely large, being two inches or more across the longest way." Elliot Coues, 1884

Short-eared Owl

"Asio accipitrinus. Short-eared Owl. Marsh Owl. Ear-tufts inconspicuous, much shorter than middle toe…

"Aluco flammeus pratincola. Barn Owl. above, including upper surfaces of wings and tail, tawny, fulvous, or orange-brown delicately clouded or marbled with ashy and white, and dotted with blackish, sometimes also with white; suck marking resolved, or tending to resolve, into four or five bars of dark mottling on the wings and tail. below, including lining of wings, varying from pure white to tawny, ochrey, or fulvous, but usually paler than the upper parts and dotted with small but distinct blackish specks. Face varying from white to fulvous or purplish-brown, in some shades as if stained with claret, usually quite dark or even black. About the eyes, and the border of the disc, dark brown. Thus extremely variable in tone of coloration, but the pattern more constant, while the generic characters render the bird unmistakable. Nestlings are covered with fluffy white down." Elliot Coues, 1884

Small Barn Owls

"Aluco flammeus pratincola. Barn Owl. above, including upper surfaces of wings and tail, tawny, fulvous,…

"Nyctea scandiaca. Snowy Owl. Pure white, spotted and barred with brownish-black markings, wholly indeterminate in size and number; but entirely white specimens are very rare. There is often more black then white; and in the darkest birds, the markings tend to bar the plumage with with rows of spots, such pattern specially evident of the wings and tails. A common average plumage is spotted all over the upper parts, broken-barred on the quills and tail-feathers, regularly barred on the under parts, and with white face and paws. The face, throat, and feet are usually whitest. Bill and claws black; iris yellow. Nearly or about two two feet long." Elliot Coues, 1884

Snowy Owl

"Nyctea scandiaca. Snowy Owl. Pure white, spotted and barred with brownish-black markings, wholly indeterminate…

The white owl (also known as the snowy or ermine owl), found in the colder latitudes of the world. Its heavy coating of feathers is well-suited to arctic climes.

White Owl

The white owl (also known as the snowy or ermine owl), found in the colder latitudes of the world. Its…

A young barn-owl.

Young Barn Owl

A young barn-owl.

"Aluco flammeus pratincola. Barn Owl. above, including upper surfaces of wings and tail, tawny, fulvous, or orange-brown delicately clouded or marbled with ashy and white, and dotted with blackish, sometimes also with white; suck marking resolved, or tending to resolve, into four or five bars of dark mottling on the wings and tail. below, including lining of wings, varying from pure white to tawny, ochrey, or fulvous, but usually paler than the upper parts and dotted with small but distinct blackish specks. Face varying from white to fulvous or purplish-brown, in some shades as if stained with claret, usually quite dark or even black. About the eyes, and the border of the disc, dark brown. Thus extremely variable in tone of coloration, but the pattern more constant, while the generic characters render the bird unmistakable. Nestlings are covered with fluffy white down." Elliot Coues, 1884

Barn Owls

"Aluco flammeus pratincola. Barn Owl. above, including upper surfaces of wings and tail, tawny, fulvous,…

"Nyctala - Saw-whet Owls. Skull and ear-parts highly unsymmetrical, the the latter of great size, and fully operculate. Head very large (as in Strix), without plumicorns; facial disc complete, with centric eye. Nostril at edge of the cere, which is inflated or not. Tail from 1/2 to 2/3rds as long as the wing, rounded. Third and 4th primaries longest; 1st quite short; 2 or 3 emarginate on inner webs. Feet thickly and closely feathered to the claws. In this interesting genus the ear-parts are of great size, and reach the extreme of asymmetry, the whole skull seeming misshapen." Glaucidium. Gnome Owls. Sparrow Owls. Pygmy owls. Size very small. Head perfectly smooth; no plumicorns; ear-parts small, non-operculate; facial disc very incomplete, the eye not centric. Nostril circular, opening in the tumid cere; bill robust. Tarsus fully and closely feathered, but toes only bristly for the most part. Wings short and much rounded, the 4th primary longest, the 1st quite short, the 3 outer ones emarginate, and next one or two sinuate. Tail long, about 3/4ths as long as the wing, even or nearly so. Claws strong, much curved. A large genus of very small owls, mostly of tropical countries. The numerous species, chiefly of warm parts of America, are in dire confusion, but the only two known to inhabit N. Am. are well determined. The plumage of many or most species is dichromatic, as in Scops, there being a red and a gray phase independently of age, season, or sex; but the red is not known to occur in our G. gnoma. The upper parts are marked with spots or lines; bars, or rows of spots, cross the wings and tail; the under parts are streaked; there is a cervical collar." Elliot Coues, 1884

Saw-whet and Sparrow Owls

"Nyctala - Saw-whet Owls. Skull and ear-parts highly unsymmetrical, the the latter of great size, and…

"Scops. Little Horned Owls. Screech Owls. Like the miniature Bubo in form (all our species under a foot long). Skull and ear-parts symmetrical; latter small, simply elliptical, with rudimentry operculum; facial disc moderately developed; plumicorns evident; nostrils at edge of cere, which is not inflated, and shorter than the rest of the culmen. Wings rounded, but long, about twice the length of the short rounded tail, about to the end which they fold; in our species the 4th and 5th primaries longest, the 1st quite short; 3 or 4 outer primaries sinuate or emarginate on inner webs. Tarsus feathered (in our species), but toes only partly bristly (in the S. asio group) or quite naked (as in S. Flammeola). Plumage dichromatic in some cases; i.e. some individuals of the same species normally mottled gray, while others are reddish, the two phases very distinct when fully developed, but shading insensibly into each other, and entirely independent of age, season, or sex. In normal plumage, a white or whitish scapular stripe; lower parts with lengthwise blotches or shaft-lines and crosswise bars or waves of blackish or dark colors; upper parts with black or blackish shaft-lines on a finely-dappled brown or gray ground (more or less obliterated in the red phase); facial disc black-bordered nearly all around; wing-quills spotted or marbled on outer webs, barred on inner webs. Tail with light and dark bars. A large and nearly cosmopolitan genus, especially rich in tropical species; but only two are known to inhabit N. Am. one of them running into several local races very difficult to characterize satisfactorily." Elliot Coues, 1884

Screech Owls

"Scops. Little Horned Owls. Screech Owls. Like the miniature Bubo in form (all our species under a foot…

"Haematopus ostrilegus. European Oyster-catcher. (oyster-opener would b a better name, as oysters do not run fast). Upper parts glossy-black, like the head and neck. Quills, broadly margined with white on inner webs excepting towards end, and also with isolated white shafts and spaces near end. Back below, interscapulars, rump, and upper tail-coverts entirely white, as well as bases of the tail-feathers." Elliot Coues, 1884

European Oyster-catcher

"Haematopus ostrilegus. European Oyster-catcher. (oyster-opener would b a better name, as oysters do…

Oyster-catchers are noisy birds. The bill is powerful for opening mussels, oysters and other shell-fish.

Oystercatcher

Oyster-catchers are noisy birds. The bill is powerful for opening mussels, oysters and other shell-fish.

"Oyster catcher is a name applied to several American species of wading birds, also a handsome European bird, about 16 inches long."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Oystercatcher

"Oyster catcher is a name applied to several American species of wading birds, also a handsome European…

A wading bird closely allied to the plover. it is easily known from its red feet and bill, the latter being twice as long as the head. The plumage is black and white and the wings are long and pointed. Its bill is truncated at the end and has the shape of a wedge. The bird measures about sixteen inches in length.

Oystercatcher

A wading bird closely allied to the plover. it is easily known from its red feet and bill, the latter…

The European oyster-catcher is about eighteen inches in length, commonly found along the sea-coast. Its diet consists of mollusca and small crabs.

European Oystercatcher

The European oyster-catcher is about eighteen inches in length, commonly found along the sea-coast.…

A species of thrush native to Eurasia, which resembles in size and appearance the blackbird. It is migratory, moving far northward in Europe and Asia in the spring, and passing to the Mediterranean region and Africa in the fall.

Ring Ouzel

A species of thrush native to Eurasia, which resembles in size and appearance the blackbird. It is migratory,…