158 illustrations of trees including: acacia, acorns, alder, alangium, Alaska willow, Allegheny chinkapin, allspice, almond, amelanchier, American amber tree, apple, arbor-vitae, arenga, Arizona cypress Arizona pine, aspen, astrocaryum, and avocado

"An Egyptian tree; the bark and pods are frequently used in tanning and the aqueous extract of the wood some Indian species forms the catechu of commerce."-Whitney, 1902

Acacia

"An Egyptian tree; the bark and pods are frequently used in tanning and the aqueous extract of the wood…

Spiny leafed trees or shrubs with bipinnate leaves

Acacia

Spiny leafed trees or shrubs with bipinnate leaves

Shittah, plural shittim, is Hebrew for the wood that appears on the acacia tree and is found in the Bible.

Acacia Tree

Shittah, plural shittim, is Hebrew for the wood that appears on the acacia tree and is found in the…

"A maple-tree, prob. so called from its pointed leaves. ex. Sugar maple"-Whitney, 1902

Acer

"A maple-tree, prob. so called from its pointed leaves. ex. Sugar maple"-Whitney, 1902

"A maple-tree, prob. so called from its pointed leaves. ex. Sugar maple"-Whitney, 1902

Acer

"A maple-tree, prob. so called from its pointed leaves. ex. Sugar maple"-Whitney, 1902

"Bixa orellana. 1. a pistil and two stamens; 2. a cross section of the ovary; 3. a ripe fruit. 4. a cross section of a seed." -Lindley, 1853

Achiote

"Bixa orellana. 1. a pistil and two stamens; 2. a cross section of the ovary; 3. a ripe fruit. 4. a…

This shows a sprouting acorn (Keeler, 1915).

Acorn

This shows a sprouting acorn (Keeler, 1915).

In this acorn the nut is surrounded by a scaly cup.

Acorn

In this acorn the nut is surrounded by a scaly cup.

Acorn

Acorn

Acorn

The seed or fruit of an oak.

Acorn

The seed or fruit of an oak.

Half of an acorn, cut lengthwise, filled by the very thick cotyledons, the base of which encloses the minute caulicle.

Acorn

Half of an acorn, cut lengthwise, filled by the very thick cotyledons, the base of which encloses the…

Nut (acorn) of the Oak, with its cup or cupule.

Acorn

Nut (acorn) of the Oak, with its cup or cupule.

An acorn from a dicotyledon.

Acorn

An acorn from a dicotyledon.

An illustration of an acorn.

Acorn

An illustration of an acorn.

Here is a representation of the acorn which has germinated. The roots go down while the stalk goes up.

Germinating Acorn

Here is a representation of the acorn which has germinated. The roots go down while the stalk goes up.

This shows the acorn of Bear Oak, Quercus ilicifolia, (Keeler, 1915).

Bear Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Bear Oak, Quercus ilicifolia, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Black Jack Oak, Quercus marilandica, (Keeler, 1915).

Black Jack Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Black Jack Oak, Quercus marilandica, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Black Oak, Quercus velutina, (Keeler, 1915).

Black Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Black Oak, Quercus velutina, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Bur Oak, Quercus macrocarpa, (Keeler, 1915).

Bur Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Bur Oak, Quercus macrocarpa, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of chestnut Oak, Quercus prinus, (Keeler, 1915).

Chestnut Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of chestnut Oak, Quercus prinus, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Chinquapin Oak, Quercus prinoides, (Keeler, 1915).

Chinquapin Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Chinquapin Oak, Quercus prinoides, (Keeler, 1915).

A cross-section of an acorn.

Cross-section of an acorn

A cross-section of an acorn.

A longitudinal section of an acorn, showing two cotyledons and the embryo.

Longitudinal section of an acorn

A longitudinal section of an acorn, showing two cotyledons and the embryo.

This shows the acorn of Pin Oak, Quercus palustris, (Keeler, 1915).

Pin Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Pin Oak, Quercus palustris, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Post Oak, Quercus minor, (Keeler, 1915).

Post Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Post Oak, Quercus minor, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Red Oak, Quercus rubra, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Red Oak, Quercus rubra, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Scarlet Oak, Quercus coccinea, (Keeler, 1915).

Scarlet Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Scarlet Oak, Quercus coccinea, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Shingle Oak, Quercus imbricaria, (Keeler, 1915).

Shingle Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Shingle Oak, Quercus imbricaria, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows acorns of Spanish Oak, Quercus digitata, (Keeler, 1915).

Spanish Oak Acorn

This shows acorns of Spanish Oak, Quercus digitata, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Swamp White Oak, Quercus platanoides, (Keeler, 1915).

Swamp Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Swamp White Oak, Quercus platanoides, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Willow Oak, Quercus phellos, (Keeler, 1915).

Willow Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Willow Oak, Quercus phellos, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the acorn of Yellow Oak, Quercus acuminata, (Keeler, 1915).

Yellow Oak Acorn

This shows the acorn of Yellow Oak, Quercus acuminata, (Keeler, 1915).

"Æsculus Hippocastanum (a, flower; b, seed; c, seed cut longitudinally."-Whitney, 1902

Aesculus

"Æsculus Hippocastanum (a, flower; b, seed; c, seed cut longitudinally."-Whitney, 1902

An illustration of an Agathis branch. The genus Agathis, commonly known as kauri or dammar, is a relatively small genus of 21 species of evergreen trees in the very ancient Araucariaceae family of conifers. While initially widespread during the Jurassic period they are now found only in small areas of the southern hemisphere. The trees have characteristically very large trunks and little or no branching for some way up. Young trees are normally conical in shape, only upon maturity does the crown become more rounded or irregularly shaped.

Agathis Branch

An illustration of an Agathis branch. The genus Agathis, commonly known as kauri or dammar, is a relatively…

"Tip of branch of Ailanthus in winter condition, showing very large leaf-scars and nearly naked buds." -Bergen, 1896

Ailanthus Branch

"Tip of branch of Ailanthus in winter condition, showing very large leaf-scars and nearly naked buds."…

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered, but with the odd leaflet often dwarfed or broken off; leaflets, twenty-one to forty-one); alternate; edge of the leaflets entire, with one or two coarse, blunt teeth at each side of their base. Outline - of leaflet, long egg-shape or lance-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base, squared, or heart-shaped. Leaf/Stem - smooth, round, swollen at base. Leaflet/Stems - smooth and short. Leaf - one and a half to six feet long. Leaflets variable, usually about six inches by two and a quarter, rather smooth and thin. Bark - of the trunk, smooth and brown; the new shoots marked with whitish dots. Flowers - in long bunches at the ends of the branches; greenish, and of very disagreeable odor. June, July. Seeds - flat, at the centre of greenish and sometimes pink-tinged wings, in large, loose clusters. October. Found - common in cultivation, and to some extent naturalized. General Information - A large, showy tree (sixty to seventy feet high) of remarkable vigorous and rapid growth. It is a native of China. A Jesuit missionary sent its seeds in 1751 to England. In 1784 it was brought from Europe to the United States, and started near Philadelphia. Also about 1804 it was brought to Rhode Island from South America. But the source of most of the trees now found abundantly in the region of New York is Flushing, Long Island, where it was introduced in 1820. It has been a great favorite, and would deserve to be so still were it not for the peculiar and disagreeable odor of its flowers. Ailanthus, from a Greek word meaning "tree of heaven." Ailanthus - This spelling of the name should rule because so given by its author, although, etymologically, Ailantus would be correct, the native Amboyna name being "Aylanto."

Genus Ailanthus, Desf.

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered, but with the odd leaflet often dwarfed or broken off; leaflets, twenty-one…

Marlea begonifolia or Alangium chinense is an evergreen tree native in China used for its medicinal purposes.

Alangium

Marlea begonifolia or Alangium chinense is an evergreen tree native in China used for its medicinal…

Also known as Salix alaxensis. The branch of an Alaska Willow tree, a species of willow.

Branch of Alaska Willow

Also known as Salix alaxensis. The branch of an Alaska Willow tree, a species of willow.

A tree whose wood is soft and red. It is a wetland tree that grows throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia.

Alder

A tree whose wood is soft and red. It is a wetland tree that grows throughout the Americas, Europe and…

An illustration of an alder branch.

Alder Branch

An illustration of an alder branch.

"Alnus glutinosa. A, a flowering twig; s, staminate catkins; p, pistillate catkins; B, a group of staminate flowers, enlarged; C, two pistillate flowers, enlarged." -Bergen, 1896

Alder Flowers

"Alnus glutinosa. A, a flowering twig; s, staminate catkins; p, pistillate catkins; B, a group of staminate…

Leaf, when examined with hand lends, not showing zones.

Alismaceae

Leaf, when examined with hand lends, not showing zones.

Also known as Castanea pumila. The branch of an Allegheny Chinkapin tree, native to the eastern United States.

Branch of Allegheny Chinkapin

Also known as Castanea pumila. The branch of an Allegheny Chinkapin tree, native to the eastern United…

A tree with white blossoms that are very aromatic. As an herb, it is used for culianry and medicinal purposes.

Allspice

A tree with white blossoms that are very aromatic. As an herb, it is used for culianry and medicinal…

The fruit of the small, deciduous almond tree.

Almond

The fruit of the small, deciduous almond tree.

A tree with pinkish blossoms whose fruit is very fiborous. It is native to Asia and Africa but is grown in England and Europe for it's fruit.

Almond

A tree with pinkish blossoms whose fruit is very fiborous. It is native to Asia and Africa but is grown…

The pink blossom of an almond tree.

Almond

The pink blossom of an almond tree.

The fruit of an almond tree.

Almond

The fruit of an almond tree.

The branch, blossom, and fruit of the almond tree.

Almond

The branch, blossom, and fruit of the almond tree.

The branch, nuts, and flowers of an almond tree.

Almond Tree

The branch, nuts, and flowers of an almond tree.

"A genus of the natural orer Rosaceae, sub-order Amygdaleae or Drupaceae, consisting of trees or shrubs, distinguished by the coarsely furrowed and wrinkled shell of the drupe, and by the young leaves being conduplicate, or having their sides folded together." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Almond Tree

"A genus of the natural orer Rosaceae, sub-order Amygdaleae or Drupaceae, consisting of trees or shrubs,…

The almond is native to Iran, from northwestern Saudi Arabia, north through western Jordan, Israel, Lebanon, western Syria, to southern Turkey. It is a small deciduous tree, growing to between 4 and 10 meters in height, with a trunk of up to 30 centimeters in diameter. The young shoots are green at first, becoming purplish where exposed to sunlight, then grey in their second year. The leaves are 1 cm long and 1.2–4 cm broad, with a serrated margin and a 2.5 cm petiole. The flowers are white or pale pink, 3–5 cm diameter with five petals, produced singly or in pairs before the leaves in early spring. The fruit is a drupe 3.5–6 cm long, with a downy outer coat. The outer covering or exocarp, (fleshy in other members of Prunus such as the plum and cherry), is instead a leathery grey-green coating called the hull, which contains inside a hard shell, and the edible seed, commonly called a nut in culinary terms. Generally, one seed is present, but occasionally there are two. In botanical terms, an almond is not a true nut. The reticulated hard woody shell (like the outside of a peach pit) surrounding the edible seed is called the endocarp. The fruit is mature in the autumn, 7–8 months after flowering.

Almond Tree and Fruit

The almond is native to Iran, from northwestern Saudi Arabia, north through western Jordan, Israel,…

"A species of Prunus, P. communis, producing the common almond."-Whitney, 1902

Almond-tree

"A species of Prunus, P. communis, producing the common almond."-Whitney, 1902

This shows the leaf of the Almondleaf Willow, Salix amygdaloides, (Keeler, 1915).

Almondleaf Willow Leaf

This shows the leaf of the Almondleaf Willow, Salix amygdaloides, (Keeler, 1915).

Buds with a single scale; fruit cone-like.

Alnus

Buds with a single scale; fruit cone-like.

Alnus is also known as the Adler Tree. The flower clusters on the alnus glutinosa tree are known as catkins which are large, long, and shaped like a cylinder.

Alnus Glutinosa Catkins and Fruit

Alnus is also known as the Adler Tree. The flower clusters on the alnus glutinosa tree are known as…

The branch of an Alnus oregona, a species of alder tree.

Branch of Alnus Oregona

The branch of an Alnus oregona, a species of alder tree.

The branch of an Alnus sitchensis, a species of Alder tree.

Branch of Alnus Sitchensis

The branch of an Alnus sitchensis, a species of Alder tree.

Also known as Larix lyallii. A species of larch native to northwestern North America.

Alpine Larch Pine Cone

Also known as Larix lyallii. A species of larch native to northwestern North America.

Amelanchier, also known as shadbush, serviceberry, sarvisberry, juneberry, Saskatoon, shadblow, shadwood, sugarplum, and wild-plum, is a genus of about 20 species of shrubs and small deciduous trees in the Rosaceae (Rose family). The genus is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, growing primarily in early successional habitats. It is most diverse taxonomically in North America, especially in the northern United States and southern Canada, and is native to every state of the United States except Hawaii. Two species also occur in Asia, and one in Europe. These plants are valued horticulturally, and their fruits are important to wildlife.

Amelanchier

Amelanchier, also known as shadbush, serviceberry, sarvisberry, juneberry, Saskatoon, shadblow, shadwood,…