149 illustrations of trees including: bald cypress, balsam fir, banana, banyan, baobab, basswood, beaked willow, beech, birch, butternut, black ash, black cottonwood, black oak, black walnut, bladdernut, bottle tree, breadfruit, buckeye, bull pine, bur oak, butternut, and buttonwood

An image of a bald cypress, in pyramidal cultivated form. It is otherwise known as taxodium distichum, and is native to the southeastern United States.

Bald Cypress in Cultivated Form

An image of a bald cypress, in pyramidal cultivated form. It is otherwise known as taxodium distichum,…

An image of a bald cypress in swamp form, with aerating roots, or knees. It is otherwise known as taxodium distichum, and is native to the southeastern United States.

Bald Cypress in Swamp Form

An image of a bald cypress in swamp form, with aerating roots, or knees. It is otherwise known as taxodium…

Also known as Taxodium distichum. A species of conifer native to the southeastern United States.

Pine Cone of Bald Cypress

Also known as Taxodium distichum. A species of conifer native to the southeastern United States.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - heart-shape. Leaf/Stem - usually hairy, nearly round. Leaf/Bud - in the spring is large and varnished, and very fragrant. Leaf - four to six inches long, nearly as broad; yellowish when young, becoming dark green above, and whitish beneath; net-veined. Bark - smooth and greenish, and often dark-spotted. Found - seldom or never growing wild, but common in cultivation. General Information - a tree forth to fifty feet high, loosely and irregularly branches, and with abundant foliage.

Genus Populus, L. (Aspen, Poplar)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - heart-shape.…

Leaves - Simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged singly up and down the branchlets, at first radiating about equally on every side, afterward flattened into two ranks, as in the Hemlock. Leaf - one half to one inch long, narrow; apex blunt or notched; edge entire; flat, with a grooved line above and a corresponding raised line below; bright green above; silvery white below. Bark - smooth and unbroken (especially when young), and usually covered with "blisters." Cones - two to four inches long, one inch broad, erect, at the sides of the branchlets; violet-colored. Scales - thin and flat, broad and rounded. The thin bracts between the scales are tipped with a slender bristle. The cone falls apart when ripe. Found - from the far North through the Northern States to Pennsylvania, and along the Alleghany Mountains to the high peaks of West Virginia. Common northward in damp forests. General Information - A slender, evergreen tree, twenty to sixty feet high; pyramid-shaped, with regular horizontal branches; its wood is very light and soft. From the "blisters," which form under the bark of the trunk and branches, the valuable Canada balsam is obtained. The tree is short-lived, and therefore of less value in cultivation.

Genus Abies, Link. (Fir)

Leaves - Simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged singly up and down the…

Also known as Abies balsamea. A North American fir, generally found in most of the eastern and central areas of the United States and Canada.

Pine Cone of Balsam Fir

Also known as Abies balsamea. A North American fir, generally found in most of the eastern and central…

This shows the staminate flower of the Balsam, Populus balsamifera, (Keeler, 1915).

Balsam Flower

This shows the staminate flower of the Balsam, Populus balsamifera, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the pistillate flower of the Balsam, Populus balsamifera, (Keeler, 1915).

Balsam Flower

This shows the pistillate flower of the Balsam, Populus balsamifera, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the fruiting aments of the Balsam, Populus balsamifera, (Keeler, 1915).

Balsam Fruit

This shows the fruiting aments of the Balsam, Populus balsamifera, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge finely and rather sharply toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - rounded. Leaf/Stem - nearly smooth, the lower half rounded, the upper part only slightly flattened. Leaf/Bud - in the spring is large and yellow, and covered with a fragrant gum (as, to some extent, are the buds of most of the poplars). Leaf - four to six inches long; when young, yellowish above, becoming bright green; whitish, and "net-veined" below; smooth. Found - in Northern New England, Central Michigan, and Minnesota, and far northward. General Information - A tree sixty to seventy feet high, with very light and soft wood.

Genus Populus, L. (Aspen, Poplar)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge finely and rather sharply toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed.…

A tree bearing bananas.

Banana

A tree bearing bananas.

The tree that produces the tropical fruit banana.

Banana

The tree that produces the tropical fruit banana.

Thought to be native to Southern Asia. They are extensively cultivated throughout the tropical zones, both north and south of the equator. Since their fruit is very nutritious, and the yield of a given fruit are great, they form an exceedingly important staple of food.

Banana

Thought to be native to Southern Asia. They are extensively cultivated throughout the tropical zones,…

An illustration of a large banana plant. Banana is the common name for a fruit and also the herbaceous plants of the genus Musa which produce this commonly eaten fruit. They are native to the tropical region of Southeast Asia. Bananas are likely to have been first domesticated in Papua New Guinea. Today, they are cultivated throughout the tropics.

Banana Plant

An illustration of a large banana plant. Banana is the common name for a fruit and also the herbaceous…

The fruit of a species of the plantain-tree.

Bananas

The fruit of a species of the plantain-tree.

The banyan is actually a variety of a fig plant that germinates in the branches of trees. It sends down aerial rootlets that germinate upon hitting the ground and spread out into a grove-like appearance.

Banyan

The banyan is actually a variety of a fig plant that germinates in the branches of trees. It sends down…

"The Banyan Tree is a species of the genus ficus. It is regarded as a sacred tree by the Hindus. Its branches produce long shoots, or aerial roots, which descend to the ground and penetrate the soil; so that, in course of time, a single tree becomes a vast umbrageous tent, supported by numerous columns."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Banyan Tree

"The Banyan Tree is a species of the genus ficus. It is regarded as a sacred tree by the Hindus. Its…

East Indian tree that puts out aerial shoots that grow down into the soil forming additional trunks.

Banyan Tree

East Indian tree that puts out aerial shoots that grow down into the soil forming additional trunks.

"This tree, a native of India, is remarkable for its vast branches. It is a species of fig; has ovate, heart-shaped, entire leaves, about five or six inches long, and produces a fruit of a rich scarlet, not larger than a cherry, growing in pairs from the axils of the leaves." -Lupton

Banyan Tree

"This tree, a native of India, is remarkable for its vast branches. It is a species of fig; has ovate,…

The baobab tree or monkey-tree belongs to the order Bombaceae. It is one f the largest of trees, its trunk sometimes attaining a diameter of 30 feet.

Baobab

The baobab tree or monkey-tree belongs to the order Bombaceae. It is one f the largest of trees, its…

An African tree.

Baobab

An African tree.

The outside covering of a tree; the rind.

Bark

The outside covering of a tree; the rind.

Illustrated is the bark of pinus sylvestris invaded by peridermium pini. A represents young peridia and B represents peridium opened.

Bark of Pinus Sylvestris Invaded by Peridermium Pini

Illustrated is the bark of pinus sylvestris invaded by peridermium pini. A represents young peridia…

It is a slow-growing long-lived tree, hard to transplant because of its long taproot, and subject to insect damage.

Shell-Bark Hickory

It is a slow-growing long-lived tree, hard to transplant because of its long taproot, and subject to…

"The bark lies immediately beneath the epidermis. It consists of several layers. In the early state it is cellular, and is exactly like the pith with which it is in contact; but by the production of vessels and woody fiber, they are separated and become very different in appearance and constitution. The bark consists of two portions, the cellular and vascular, the latter of which is called liber, and the inner portion of the bark."—Darby, 1855

The Bark

"The bark lies immediately beneath the epidermis. It consists of several layers. In the early state…

Magnified wood-cells of the bark (bast-cells) of Basswood, one and part of another.

Basswood

Magnified wood-cells of the bark (bast-cells) of Basswood, one and part of another.

Magnified wood-cells of the bark (bast-cells) of Basswood, one and part of another.

Basswood

Magnified wood-cells of the bark (bast-cells) of Basswood, one and part of another.

This shows the axillary buds on a twig of Basswood, they are alternate like the leaves.

Basswood Buds

This shows the axillary buds on a twig of Basswood, they are alternate like the leaves.

Leaves - simple/alternate; edge somewhat irregularly very sharp-toothed. Outline - rounded, often very one-sided. Apex - pointed. Base - strongly heart-shaped. Leaf - usually about three to four inches wide, four to five inches long; sometimes much larger; rather thick, very smooth and shining above; with small tufts of reddish hairs in the angles of the ribs below; and often with the ribs themselves hairy. Bark - of the trunk very thick; on the young branches dark brown. Fruit - gray-downy, ovate, the size of small peas, clustered on a long stem of which the lower half is joined to half the length of a narrow, leaf-like bract, usually with a tapering base. Found - in rich woods, from British America southward to Virginia and along the Alleghany Mountains and westward. General Information - A straight-trunked tree, sixty to eighty feet high (often unbranching to half its height) and two to four feet in diameter. Its very tough inner bark is used for mats and coarse rope. The wood is white and soft and clear of knots. It is much used for wooden ware, in cabinet-work, and for the paneling of carriages, though now less esteemed than the tulip tree for these uses, owing to its liability to crack in bending.

Genus Tilia, L. (Basswood)

Leaves - simple/alternate; edge somewhat irregularly very sharp-toothed. Outline - rounded, often very…

Leaves - simple/alternate; edge somewhat irregularly very sharp-toothed. Outline - rounded, often very one-sided. Apex - pointed. Base - strongly heart-shaped. Leaf - two to three inches long; thinner than the T. Americana, deep green and shining above, beneath somewhat downy. Bark - of the trunk very thick; on the young branches dark brown. Fruit - rounded, about one fourth of an inch in diameter, and with the base of the leaf-like bract to which it is attached usually rounded at the base. Found - in rich woods, from New York to Florida and westward..   General Information - A straight-trunked tree, twenty to thirty feet high (often unbranching to half its height) and two to four feet in diameter. Its very tough inner bark is used for mats and coarse rope. The wood is white and soft and clear of knots. It is much used for wooden ware, in cabinet-work, and for the paneling of carriages, though now less esteemed than the tulip tree for these uses, owing to its liability to crack in bending.

Genus Tilia, L. (Basswood)

Leaves - simple/alternate; edge somewhat irregularly very sharp-toothed. Outline - rounded, often very…

A palm tree that is commonly found in Australia and New Zealand. They tend to reach about 32 feet, and the fruits grown turn bright red when ripe.

Rhopalostylis Baueri

A palm tree that is commonly found in Australia and New Zealand. They tend to reach about 32 feet, and…

Also known as Salix bebbiana. The branch of a Beaked Willow, native to Canada and the northern United States.

Branch of Beaked Willow

Also known as Salix bebbiana. The branch of a Beaked Willow, native to Canada and the northern United…

Also known as Quercus ilicifolia. The branch of a Bear Oak tree, native to the northeastern United States.

Branch of Bear Oak

Also known as Quercus ilicifolia. The branch of a Bear Oak tree, native to the northeastern United States.

<i>Beucarnea guatemalensis</i> is native to Guatemala. The tree grows twenty feet tall. The leaves are green, thin, smooth edged, and recurving.

Beaucarnea Guatemalensis

Beucarnea guatemalensis is native to Guatemala. The tree grows twenty feet tall. The leaves are green,…

An illustration of a flowering branch and empty cupule of beech. Beech (Fagus) is a genus of ten species of deciduous trees in the family Fagaceae, native to temperate Europe and North America.

Beech

An illustration of a flowering branch and empty cupule of beech. Beech (Fagus) is a genus of ten species…

An illustration of a beech branch.

Beech Branch

An illustration of a beech branch.

This shows the staminate flower of the Beech, (Keeler, 1915).

Beech Flower

This shows the staminate flower of the Beech, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the pistillate flower of the Beech, (Keeler, 1915).

Beech Flower

This shows the pistillate flower of the Beech, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the staminate and pistillate flower cluster of the Beech, (Keeler, 1915).

Beech Flower

This shows the staminate and pistillate flower cluster of the Beech, (Keeler, 1915).

The fruit and leaves of a beech tree.

Beech Fruit and Leaves

The fruit and leaves of a beech tree.

"Leaf arrangement of European beech." -Bergen, 1896

European Beech Leaves

"Leaf arrangement of European beech." -Bergen, 1896

"Branch of Common Beech. a.-- flower; b.-- fruit. Beech, the common name of trees well known in various parts of the world, including America, New Zealand, and Terra del Fuego." -Vaughan, 1906

Common Beech

"Branch of Common Beech. a.-- flower; b.-- fruit. Beech, the common name of trees well known in various…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed, with small and remote teeth. Outline - oval or egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - rounded. Leaf - three to six inches long, about half as wide; a very "finished" leaf; when young, fringed with soft white hairs; becoming smooth and polished; with distinct and straight unbranched side-ribs, ending in the teeth of the edge. The dead, bleached leaves often cling thickly to the branches throughout the winter. Bark - of the trunk, light gray, smooth, and unbroken. Fruit - a small four-celled prickly burr, splitting half-way to the base when ripe, and with two sweet, three-sided nuts in each shell.Found - in rich woods, Nova Scotia to Florida and westward, with it finest growth on the "bluffs" of the lower Mississippi basin. General Information - Large stately trees, with spreading branches and a delicate spray, fifty to eighty feet high. The wood is hard and very close-grained, and is used largely in the making of chairs, handles, plan-stocks, shoe-lasts, and for fuel. When the tree is not crowded, it sends out its nearly horizontal or drooping branches as low as from ten to thirty feet above the ground. Lumber-men make the distinction of "red Beech" and "White Beech," claiming that the former is harder, with a redder and thicker heart-wood.  Among woodsmen and the Indians, the Beech is said to be a favorite refuge in thunder-storms. They claim that it is scarcely ever struck by lightning. Lumber-men claim a difference in the quality of trees which retain their leaves and those which shed them. "Said a neighbor to me one day: 'You might 'a knowed that beech would split hard with all the dry leaves on it,' -- and it did. That was the first I'd ever heard of the sign, but I've never known it fail since."

Genus Fagus, L. (Beech)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed, with small and remote teeth. Outline - oval or egg-shape.…

A Beech-nut, cut across.

Beech-nut

A Beech-nut, cut across.

Beginning germination of the Beech, showing the plumule growing before the cotyledons have opened or the root has scarcely formed.

Beech-nut Germination

Beginning germination of the Beech, showing the plumule growing before the cotyledons have opened or…

Older beech with the plumule-leaves developing, and elevated on a long internodes.

Beech-nut Germination Older

Older beech with the plumule-leaves developing, and elevated on a long internodes.

"Casuarina female; 2. male; 3. male flower; 4. female flower; 5. the ripe valves of the calyx, from which the fruit has been taken; 6. a section of the half ripe ovary; 7. a section of the fruit showing the seed and embryo." -Lindley, 1853

Beefwood

"Casuarina female; 2. male; 3. male flower; 4. female flower; 5. the ripe valves of the calyx, from…

This illustration shows a tree that has been damaged by a sprice-destroying beetle. a, primary gallery; b, borings packed in side; e, entrance and central burrow through the packed borings; d, larval mines-note how the eggs are grouped on the sides.

Beetle Damage

This illustration shows a tree that has been damaged by a sprice-destroying beetle. a, primary gallery;…

Fruit oval, longer than broad; leaves mostly over 6cm.

Benzoin

Fruit oval, longer than broad; leaves mostly over 6cm.

Leaves not leathery, entire or with wavy edges.

Berchemia

Leaves not leathery, entire or with wavy edges.

"Berrya ammonilla. 1. a flower; 2. the ovary and two stamens; 3. a cross section of the ovary; 4. a perpendicular section of it; 5. a portion of its fruit." -Lindley, 1853

Berrya

"Berrya ammonilla. 1. a flower; 2. the ovary and two stamens; 3. a cross section of the ovary; 4. a…

"Pistacia atlantica. 1. male flowers; 2. an ovary; 3. the same cut open to show the ovule; 4. a ripe fruit opened to show the seed; 5. a cross section of the embryo; 6. female flowers." -Lindley, 1853

Betoum

"Pistacia atlantica. 1. male flowers; 2. an ovary; 3. the same cut open to show the ovule; 4. a ripe…

Bark falling away in reddish, papery layers.

Betula

Bark falling away in reddish, papery layers.

The branch of a Betula alaskana, a species of birch tree.

Branch of Betula Alaskana

The branch of a Betula alaskana, a species of birch tree.

The branch of a Betula coerulea.

Branch of Betula Coerulea

The branch of a Betula coerulea.

Also known as Sequoia wellington.

Pine Cone of Big Tree

Also known as Sequoia wellington.

A drawing of the "big trees" first observed in California.

Big Trees of California

A drawing of the "big trees" first observed in California.

Also known as Pseudotsuga macrocarpa. A conifer native to southern California.

Pine Cone of Bigcone Douglas Fir

Also known as Pseudotsuga macrocarpa. A conifer native to southern California.

"Thuja orientalis; 1. a magnified fragment of a branch bearing a cone of male flowers; 2. a portion of a female branch; 3, 4. scales with naked ovules; 5. a vertical section of a ripe seed." -Lindley, 1853

Biota

"Thuja orientalis; 1. a magnified fragment of a branch bearing a cone of male flowers; 2. a portion…

Catkin or ament of birch.

Birch

Catkin or ament of birch.