266 illustrations of trees including: oak, ocotea catesbyana, olive, orange, Pacific yew, palm, Ceylon palm, sago palm, sabal palm, palmetto, papaw, papaya, paper birch, parasol pine, peach, pear, pecan, persea, persimmon, pignut, pin-oak, pitch pine, plantain, plum, pomegranate, and poplar

Two pears of the Keiffer type.

Kieffer

Two pears of the Keiffer type.

The inside of a Kieffer pear.

Kieffer

The inside of a Kieffer pear.

Oaks are easily recognized by their characteristic leaves and especially by their peculiar fruit, the well-known acorn.

Oak

Oaks are easily recognized by their characteristic leaves and especially by their peculiar fruit, the…

Oak trees grow in many parts of the country.

Oak

Oak trees grow in many parts of the country.

Oak trees grow in many parts of the country.

Oak

Oak trees grow in many parts of the country.

A valuable and well known tree, or its wood.

Oak

A valuable and well known tree, or its wood.

A genus of trees and shrubs widely distributed in the temperate zones of all the continents, but most abundant in North America. They are not common to the tropical regions of South America, Africa, or Australia.

Oak

A genus of trees and shrubs widely distributed in the temperate zones of all the continents, but most…

Oak tree leaf

Oak

Oak tree leaf

An illustration of a large oak tree. Oaks have spirally arranged leaves, with a lobed margin in many species; some have serrated leaves or entire leaves with a smooth margin. The flowers are catkins, produced in spring. The fruit is a nut called an acorn, borne in a cup-like structure known as a cupule; each acorn contains one seed (rarely two or three) and takes 6–18 months to mature, depending on species.

Oak

An illustration of a large oak tree. Oaks have spirally arranged leaves, with a lobed margin in many…

"Acorn and cupule of Quercus Skinneri, natural size; 2. cross section of the acorn, showing the lobed embryo." -Lindley, 1853

Acorn

"Acorn and cupule of Quercus Skinneri, natural size; 2. cross section of the acorn, showing the lobed…

An illustration of an oak branch.

Oak Branch

An illustration of an oak branch.

Eastern Black oak (Quercus velutina), or more commonly known as simply Black Oak is an oak in the red oak (Quercus sect. Lobatae) group of oaks. It is native to eastern North America from southern Ontario south to northern Florida and southern Maine west to northeastern Texas. It is a common tree in the Indiana Dunes and other sandy dunal ecosystems along the southern shores of Lake Michigan. It is most often found in dry well draining upland soils which can be clayey or sandy in nature in most of the rest of its range. In the northern part of its range, black oak is a relatively small tree, reaching a height of 20-25 m (65-80 ft) and a diameter of 90 cm (35 in), but it grows larger in the south and center of its range, where heights of up to 42 m (140 ft) are known. Black Oak is well known to readily hybridize with other members of the red oak (Quercus sect. Lobatae) group of oaks being one parent in at least a dozen different named hybrids. he inner bark of the black oak contains a yellow pigment called quercitron, which was sold commercially in Europe until the 1940s.

Eastern Black Oak Branch

Eastern Black oak (Quercus velutina), or more commonly known as simply Black Oak is an oak in the red…

The male flower

Oak Flowers

The male flower

The female flower

Oak Flowers

The female flower

Female flowers of <em>q</em>, pedunculata

Oak Flowers

Female flowers of q, pedunculata

Male flowers of <em>q</em>, sessiliflora

Oak Flowers

Male flowers of q, sessiliflora

Female flowers of <em>q</em>, sessiliflora, after fertilization

Oak Flowers

Female flowers of q, sessiliflora, after fertilization

The various types of oak leaves: "a. Bur oak, b. Live oak, c. Willow oak, d. White oak." -Foster, 1921

Oak Leaves

The various types of oak leaves: "a. Bur oak, b. Live oak, c. Willow oak, d. White oak." -Foster, 1921

"Leaf arrangement of the oak." -Bergen, 1896

Oak Leaves

"Leaf arrangement of the oak." -Bergen, 1896

Giant oak with man.

Oak tree

Giant oak with man.

Oak Tree

Oak Tree

Oak Tree

Also known as Quercus suber. It is a medium-sized oak tree, and it is the primary source of cork for wine bottle stoppers. It is commonly found in southwest Europe and northwest Africa.

Cork Oak

Also known as Quercus suber. It is a medium-sized oak tree, and it is the primary source of cork for…

Also known as Quercus cerris. A greenish-white tree with a dark gray bark. The flower produced is a cylindrical cluster of yellow flowers, which are usually wind-pollinated. The fruit is a large acorn, which is bicoloured with an orange bottom half grading to a green-brown tip.

Turkey Oak

Also known as Quercus cerris. A greenish-white tree with a dark gray bark. The flower produced is a…

White oak is the common name of <i>quercus alba</i>.

White Oak

White oak is the common name of quercus alba.

An oak seedling.

Oak-seedling

An oak seedling.

Evergreen native to North America.

Thuja Occidentalis

Evergreen native to North America.

"Ochna dubia. 1. expanded flower; 2. section of pistil and stamens; 3. pistil; 4. section of a ripe carpel." -Lindley, 1853

Ochna

"Ochna dubia. 1. expanded flower; 2. section of pistil and stamens; 3. pistil; 4. section of a ripe…

A branch of an Ocotea catesbyana tree. They are commonly found throughout tropical climates, including Central and South America, and Madagascar.

Branch of Ocotea Catesbyana

A branch of an Ocotea catesbyana tree. They are commonly found throughout tropical climates, including…

This plant is thought to have originated in Europe, featuring rich pink and white flowers.

Saponaria Officinalis

This plant is thought to have originated in Europe, featuring rich pink and white flowers.

Leaves - compound (hand-shaped; leaflets, five); opposite; edge toothed. Outline - of leaflet, oval or long oval. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - pointed. Leaflets - three to seven inches long; one and a half to three inches wide. Bark - with a disagreeable odor. Flowers - small, yellowish-white. June. Fruit - about three fourths of an inch in diameter. Husk - prickly when young. Nut - smooth. Found - along the western slopes of the Alleghany Mountains - Pennsylvania to Northern Alabama and westward. General Information - A small, ill-scented tree (eighteen to thirty-five feet high). Its wood is light and hard to split. With the other species of the same genus it is preferred, above any other American wood, for the making of artificial limbs.

Genus Aesculus, L. (Buckeye, Horse Chestnut)

Leaves - compound (hand-shaped; leaflets, five); opposite; edge toothed. Outline - of leaflet, oval…

Olive has been cultivated from the earliest times chiefly for its oil, which is obtained from the fruit by pressure.

Olive

Olive has been cultivated from the earliest times chiefly for its oil, which is obtained from the fruit…

A genus of evergreen trees and shrubs found in the warmer regions of temperate climates. They attain the height of from fifteen to thirty feet. The leaves are lanceolate or oblong, have a smooth surface above but horny beneath, and are bluish or dusky-green in color.

Olive

A genus of evergreen trees and shrubs found in the warmer regions of temperate climates. They attain…

Pictured is an olive branch in flower and fruit. Olives yield oil and are also prepared as a food/condiment.

Olive

Pictured is an olive branch in flower and fruit. Olives yield oil and are also prepared as a food/condiment.

The Olive (Olea europaea) is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, native to the coastal areas of the eastern Mediterranean region, from Lebanon, Syria and the maritime parts of Asia Minor and northern Iran at the south end of the Caspian Sea. Its fruit, the olive, is of major agricultural importance in the Mediterranean region as the source of olive oil. The Olive tree is an evergreen tree or shrub native to the Mediterranean, Asia and parts of Africa. It is short and squat, and rarely exceeds 8&ndash;15 meters in height. The silvery green leaves are oblong in shape, measuring 4&ndash;10 cm long and 1&ndash;3 cm wide. The trunk is typically gnarled and twisted.The small white flowers, with four-cleft calyx and corolla, two stamens and bifid stigma, are borne generally on the last year's wood, in racemes springing from the axils of the leaves. The fruit is a small drupe 1&ndash;2.5 cm long, thinner-fleshed and smaller in wild plants than in orchard cultivars. Olives are harvested at the green stage or left to ripen to a rich purple colour (black olive). Canned black olives may contain chemicals that turn them black artificially.

Olive Branch

The Olive (Olea europaea) is a species of small tree in the family Oleaceae, native to the coastal areas…

Olive branches in fruit, showing a self-sterile and a self-fertile variety.

Olive Branches in Fruit

Olive branches in fruit, showing a self-sterile and a self-fertile variety.

"By the time [olive trees] are well grown the form of the young tree is established, and further pruning for form may be done in a general manner to obtain the following results: (1) Maintenance of a comparatively open center to the tree; (2) exposure to the sun and air as large a number as possible of last year's branches around the circumference of the tree; (3) removal of all ground suckers and water sprouts; (4) preservation of outward-growing and drooping basal and lateral fruit branches; (5) heading back of upward-growing limbs, which consume much, but produce little; and, (6) the removal of all diseased or injured wood. In pruning for form the rules governing pruning for fruit should be kept in mind."—Government Printing Office, 1897

An Olive Tree

"By the time [olive trees] are well grown the form of the young tree is established, and further pruning…

"The olive tree grows abundantly in all the countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea." -Lupton It's fruit, the olive, is used as a major resource to these countries for the production of olive oil.

Olive Tree

"The olive tree grows abundantly in all the countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea." -Lupton It's…

(1) Large knots on a still vigorous branch of old olive tree. (2) Young olive tree planted to replace one destroyed by a knot. (3) Small knots on a much weakened branch.

Olive Tree Branches

(1) Large knots on a still vigorous branch of old olive tree. (2) Young olive tree planted to replace…

Pictured is an ancient olive tree in an orchard in the south of France.

Ancient Olive Tree

Pictured is an ancient olive tree in an orchard in the south of France.

Tuberculosis of olive is also known as "olive knot". Olive knot is the only serious disease which attacks the olive in California.

Olive Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis of olive is also known as "olive knot". Olive knot is the only serious disease which attacks…

Pictured are several varieties of olives: (1) ascolano, (2) sevillano, (3) manzanillo, (4) mission, (5) nevadillo, (6) frantoio, and (7) redding.

Olive Varieties

Pictured are several varieties of olives: (1) ascolano, (2) sevillano, (3) manzanillo, (4) mission,…

Also known as Juniperus monosperma. A species of Juniper native to western North America.

Branch of One-Seed Juniper

Also known as Juniperus monosperma. A species of Juniper native to western North America.

Also known as Populus balsamifera. The branch of an Ontario Balsam Poplar tree, native to northern United States.

Branch of Ontario Balsam Poplar

Also known as Populus balsamifera. The branch of an Ontario Balsam Poplar tree, native to northern United…

Orange. All the species of the genus are natives of tropical and subtropical Asia, but are now extensively cultivated throughout the warmer regions of the world.

Orange

Orange. All the species of the genus are natives of tropical and subtropical Asia, but are now extensively…

A class of fruit trees of the citrus genus, including several species. They are native to China, India, and other countries of eastern Asia. The orange tree was cultivated for its fruit from remote antiquity, but it was not introduced into Europe until brought there by the Moors in the 14th century, and was first cultivated in Portugal about 1520.

Orange

A class of fruit trees of the citrus genus, including several species. They are native to China, India,…

Hypogenous disk in Orange.

Orange

Hypogenous disk in Orange.

"Cross-section of an orange. a, axis of fruit with dots showing cut-off ends of fibro-vascular bundles; p, partition between cells of ovary; S, seed; c, cell of ovary filled with a pulp composed of irregular tubes full of juice; o, oil reservoirs near outer surface of rind; e, corky layer of epidermis." -Bergen, 1896

Orange

"Cross-section of an orange. a, axis of fruit with dots showing cut-off ends of fibro-vascular bundles;…

The Florida state flower, the orange blossom.

Orange Blossom

The Florida state flower, the orange blossom.

Two forms of the fruit, the bergamot orange.

Bergamot Orange

Two forms of the fruit, the bergamot orange.

Common or sweet orange is the common name of citrus sinensis. It is a medium sized tree with a rounded top. The flowers are white. The fruit is oval with sweet pulp.

Common or Sweet Orange

Common or sweet orange is the common name of citrus sinensis. It is a medium sized tree with a rounded…

Orange trees flower from February to March. The fruits grow to maturity is nine to eleven months.

Fruiting Branch of Orange

Orange trees flower from February to March. The fruits grow to maturity is nine to eleven months.

Kawachi, a Japanese-American type of orange.

Kawachi Orange

Kawachi, a Japanese-American type of orange.

An oonshiu orange, one of the tangerine type.

Oonshiu Orange

An oonshiu orange, one of the tangerine type.

Oreodoxa sancona is an easily cultivated and handsome species. The leafstalks a reddish brown when young.

Oreodoxa Sancona

Oreodoxa sancona is an easily cultivated and handsome species. The leafstalks a reddish brown when young.

A tree of the nettle family, so named from the Osage Mountains of Arkansas, where it is native, but it is also found in other regions of North America. The leaves are flossy and alternate, and it bears a fruit somewhat resembling an orange in size and color, but it is not edible.

Osage Orange

A tree of the nettle family, so named from the Osage Mountains of Arkansas, where it is native, but…

North American tree frequently used as a hedge plant.

Osage Orange

North American tree frequently used as a hedge plant.

An illustration of a female flower of the osage-orange plant laid open. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc (Maclura pomifera) is dioeceous plant species, with male and female flowers on different plants. It is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8&ndash;15 metres (26&ndash;49 ft) tall. The fruit, a multiple fruit, is roughly spherical, but bumpy, and 7-15 cm in diameter, and it is filled with a sticky white latex sap. In fall, its color turns a bright yellow-green and it has a faint odor similar to that of oranges

Female Flower of Osage-Orange Laid Open

An illustration of a female flower of the osage-orange plant laid open. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or…

An illustration of a female flower of the osage-orange plant. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc (Maclura pomifera) is dioeceous plant species, with male and female flowers on different plants. It is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8&ndash;15 metres (26&ndash;49 ft) tall. The fruit, a multiple fruit, is roughly spherical, but bumpy, and 7-15 cm in diameter, and it is filled with a sticky white latex sap. In fall, its color turns a bright yellow-green and it has a faint odor similar to that of oranges

Female Flower of Osage-Orange

An illustration of a female flower of the osage-orange plant. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc…

An illustration of a branch from an osage-orange plant with female inflorescence. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc (Maclura pomifera) is dioeceous plant species, with male and female flowers on different plants. It is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8&ndash;15 metres (26&ndash;49 ft) tall. The fruit, a multiple fruit, is roughly spherical, but bumpy, and 7-15 cm in diameter, and it is filled with a sticky white latex sap. In fall, its color turns a bright yellow-green and it has a faint odor similar to that of oranges

Female Inflorescence of the Osage-Orange

An illustration of a branch from an osage-orange plant with female inflorescence. Osage-orange, Horse-apple…

An illustration of a leaf of the osage-orange plant showing nervation. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc (Maclura pomifera) is dioeceous plant species, with male and female flowers on different plants. It is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8&ndash;15 metres (26&ndash;49 ft) tall. The fruit, a multiple fruit, is roughly spherical, but bumpy, and 7-15 cm in diameter, and it is filled with a sticky white latex sap. In fall, its color turns a bright yellow-green and it has a faint odor similar to that of oranges

Leaf of Osage-Orange

An illustration of a leaf of the osage-orange plant showing nervation. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or…