266 illustrations of trees including: oak, ocotea catesbyana, olive, orange, Pacific yew, palm, Ceylon palm, sago palm, sabal palm, palmetto, papaw, papaya, paper birch, parasol pine, peach, pear, pecan, persea, persimmon, pignut, pin-oak, pitch pine, plantain, plum, pomegranate, and poplar

An illustration of a male flower of the osage-orange plant. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc (Maclura pomifera) is dioeceous plant species, with male and female flowers on different plants. It is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8–15 metres (26–49 ft) tall. The fruit, a multiple fruit, is roughly spherical, but bumpy, and 7-15 cm in diameter, and it is filled with a sticky white latex sap. In fall, its color turns a bright yellow-green and it has a faint odor similar to that of oranges

Male Flower of Osage-Orange

An illustration of a male flower of the osage-orange plant. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc…

An illustration of a branch from an osage-orange plant with male flowers. Osage-orange, Horse-apple or Bois D'Arc (Maclura pomifera) is dioeceous plant species, with male and female flowers on different plants. It is a small deciduous tree or large shrub, typically growing to 8–15 metres (26–49 ft) tall. The fruit, a multiple fruit, is roughly spherical, but bumpy, and 7-15 cm in diameter, and it is filled with a sticky white latex sap. In fall, its color turns a bright yellow-green and it has a faint odor similar to that of oranges

Male Flowers of the Osage-Orange

An illustration of a branch from an osage-orange plant with male flowers. Osage-orange, Horse-apple…

The branch of an Ostrya knowltoni.

Branch of Ostrya Knowltoni

The branch of an Ostrya knowltoni.

Also known as Quercus lyrata. The branch of an Overcup Oak tree, native to the wetlands of the United States.

Branch of Overcup Oak

Also known as Quercus lyrata. The branch of an Overcup Oak tree, native to the wetlands of the United…

Also known as northern gooseberry. It is slightly smaller in diameter than Ribes grossularia and is typically found in the northwestern United States.

Ribes Oxyacanthoides

Also known as northern gooseberry. It is slightly smaller in diameter than Ribes grossularia and is…

Also known as Abies amabilis. A species of fir native to the Pacific Northwest of North America.

Pine Cone of Pacific Silver Fir

Also known as Abies amabilis. A species of fir native to the Pacific Northwest of North America.

Also known as Salix lucida. The branch of a Pacific Willow tree, native to wetland habitats in northern and western North America.

Branch of Pacific Willow

Also known as Salix lucida. The branch of a Pacific Willow tree, native to wetland habitats in northern…

Also known as Taxus brevifolia. A conifer native to the Pacific Northwest of North America.

Branch of Pacific Yew

Also known as Taxus brevifolia. A conifer native to the Pacific Northwest of North America.

The palm is indigenous to the Southern states.

Palm

The palm is indigenous to the Southern states.

"Sagus Rumphii. 1. a flower; 2. the same opened; 3. a section of an ovary; 4. a section of a seed of Sagus filaris; 5. fruit and remains of spadix." -Lindley, 1853

Palm

"Sagus Rumphii. 1. a flower; 2. the same opened; 3. a section of an ovary; 4. a section of a seed of…

Section of the stem from a palm tree, showing how endogens grow threw elongation internally. "1. Section of the stem of a palm: e, e, remains of leaf-stalks; f, bundles of woody fiber." -Whitney, 1911

Palm Stem

Section of the stem from a palm tree, showing how endogens grow threw elongation internally. "1. Section…

Palms are one of the most well-known and extensively cultivated plant families. They have had an important role to humans throughout much of history. Many common products and foods are derived from palms, and palms are also widely used in landscaping for their exotic appearance, making them one of the most economically important plants. In many historical cultures, palms were symbols for such ideas as victory, peace, and fertility. Today, palms remain a popular symbol for the tropics and vacations.

Palm Tree

Palms are one of the most well-known and extensively cultivated plant families. They have had an important…

A tree with huge fan shaped leaves, native to the tropics.

Palm Tree

A tree with huge fan shaped leaves, native to the tropics.

A tall slim tree with thich coarse leaves. Gets thinner the taller it grows.

Palm Tree

A tall slim tree with thich coarse leaves. Gets thinner the taller it grows.

Palm Trees on the beach

Palm Trees

Palm Trees on the beach

A species of palm which grows in much of the tropical Pacific, Asia, and parts of east Africa.

Betel Nut Palm

A species of palm which grows in much of the tropical Pacific, Asia, and parts of east Africa.

A ceylon palm tree.

Ceylon Palm

A ceylon palm tree.

"Palm is a natural order of endogenous plants, the products of which are of extreme importance and utility to man. The size of the leaves varies, some being only a few inches in length, while in others they attain the enormous proportions of 35 feet in length by 5 or 6 feet in breadth. The flowers are small individually, but numerous, usually of a yellow tint, and in some species powerfully odorous. The fruit when ripe is berry-like, drupaceous, plum-like, or, as in the cocoanut, nut-like."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Chamaerops Humilis Palm

"Palm is a natural order of endogenous plants, the products of which are of extreme importance and utility…

A Chinese sago palm.

Chinese Sago Palm

A Chinese sago palm.

A cocoanut tree with large brown seeds containing milk.

Cocoanut Palm

A cocoanut tree with large brown seeds containing milk.

A South American palm whose fibrous make up is used in industry and it also produces te coquilla nut.

Coquila Palm

A South American palm whose fibrous make up is used in industry and it also produces te coquilla nut.

A South American fan palm.

Cornahuba Palm

A South American fan palm.

"Date Palm is a genus of palms, the most important species of which is the common date palm, the palm tree of Scripture, a native of the N. half of Africa, the S. W. of Asia, and some parts of India, and of which the cultivation is no less wide, and still extending. Some parts of China produce large crops. The stem, which is straight and simple, reaches a height of 30 to 60 feet, and bears a head of 40 to 80 glaucous pinnated leaves, 8 to 10 feet long, and a number of branching spadices, each of which on the female tree bears 180 to 200 fruits. A bunch of dates weighs 20 or 25 pounds, so that an average year's crop may be reckoned at 300 to 600 pounds per tree, and the yield per acre at about 12 times that of corn. This is one of the most important and useful of all the palms. In Egypt, and generally in North Africa, Persia, and Arabia, dates form the principal food, and date palms the principal wealth of the people."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Date Palm

"Date Palm is a genus of palms, the most important species of which is the common date palm, the palm…

A common name for palm tree.

Date Palm

A common name for palm tree.

A type of palm having repeatedly branched stem, each branch terminating in a tuft of large fan shaped leaves.

Door Palm

A type of palm having repeatedly branched stem, each branch terminating in a tuft of large fan shaped…

An African palm that produces ginger bread flavored fruit that is very fibrous.

Doum palm

An African palm that produces ginger bread flavored fruit that is very fibrous.

An illustration of a dwarf palm.

Dwarf Palm

An illustration of a dwarf palm.

A fan palm.

Fan Palm

A fan palm.

"Inflorescence of Chamaerops humilis, in its spathe; 2. a portion of the same, with the fruit ripening; 3. a male flower; 4. a female flower; 5. a ripe fruit; 6. a section of another variety, showing the seed; 7. a seed with a portion of the surface cut away, to display the embryo." -Lindley, 1853

Fan Palm

"Inflorescence of Chamaerops humilis, in its spathe; 2. a portion of the same, with the fruit ripening;…

An Indian sago palm.

Indian Sago Palm

An Indian sago palm.

A tropical palm native to Africa, Central and South America.

Raphia Palm

A tropical palm native to Africa, Central and South America.

Roystonea (Royal Palm) is a genus of 10 species of monoecious palms, native to tropical regions of Florida, the Caribbean, and the adjacent coasts of Central and South America. Named for Roy Stone, a U.S. Army engineer, the genus contains some of the most recognizable and commonly cultivated palms (R. regia) in tropical and subtropical regions.

Royal Palm

Roystonea (Royal Palm) is a genus of 10 species of monoecious palms, native to tropical regions of Florida,…

A type of new worl palm trees. Native to the tropics.

Sabal Palm

A type of new worl palm trees. Native to the tropics.

A sago palm.

Sago palm

A sago palm.

A symmetrical plant with many dark green leaves on a hair trunk.

Sago Palm

A symmetrical plant with many dark green leaves on a hair trunk.

A starchy product obtained from the trunk of several species of a genus of palms named Sagus, and chiefly by S.Rumphii and S.Lavis. The tree is about 30 feet high, and from 18 to 22 inches in diameter.

Sago Palm

A starchy product obtained from the trunk of several species of a genus of palms named Sagus, and chiefly…

The Sago Palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a tree in the Arecaceae family of palms.

Sago Palm

The Sago Palm (Metroxylon sagu) is a tree in the Arecaceae family of palms.

A slender palm, found in rivers and marshy places in American within the tropics.

Slender Palm

A slender palm, found in rivers and marshy places in American within the tropics.

An illustration of a Traveller's Palm or Traveller's Tree which is a species of plant from Madagascar. It is actually not really a palm, but a member of the bird of paradise family.

Traveller's Palm

An illustration of a Traveller's Palm or Traveller's Tree which is a species of plant from Madagascar.…

An illustration of the Yucca Palm which grows in California, Arizona, Utah, and Nevada.

Yucca Palm

An illustration of the Yucca Palm which grows in California, Arizona, Utah, and Nevada.

A species of palm indigenous to the United States. It is found abundantly in the Carolinas, Florida, Georgia, and some sections of California. There are a number of allied species, some of which are widely distributed in Eurasia and various islands of the sea.

Palmetto

A species of palm indigenous to the United States. It is found abundantly in the Carolinas, Florida,…

This illustration shows the Chamaerops Palmetto, in various stages, and the Yucca Draconis.

Palmetto

This illustration shows the Chamaerops Palmetto, in various stages, and the Yucca Draconis.

The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is a palm in the genus Phoenix, extensively cultivated for its edible fruit. Due to its long history of cultivation for fruit, its exact native distribution is unknown, but probably originated somewhere in the desert oases of northern Africa, and perhaps also southwest Asia. It is a medium-sized tree, 15–25 m tall, often clumped with several trunks from a single root system, but often growing singly as well. The leaves are pinnate, 3–5 m long, with spines on the petiole and about 150 leaflets; the leaflets are 30 cm long and 2 cm broad. The full span of the crown ranges from 6–10 m.

Date Palms

The Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is a palm in the genus Phoenix, extensively cultivated for its edible…

"Palm Trees. 1. Corypha Gebanga; 2. Nipa fruiticans." -Lindley, 1853

Gebang and Nipa Palm Trees

"Palm Trees. 1. Corypha Gebanga; 2. Nipa fruiticans." -Lindley, 1853

"Dorystigma. 1. a corolla laid open; 2. calyx and pistil; 3. seed; 4. section of ditto." -Lindley, 1853

Pandanus

"Dorystigma. 1. a corolla laid open; 2. calyx and pistil; 3. seed; 4. section of ditto." -Lindley, 1853

A tree native to tropical America, allied to the passion flower family, and now extensively cultivated in tropical countries. It has a remarkably tapering sem crowned by a tuft of leaves on long footstalks, with the flowers below, and grows to a height of from fifteen to twenty feet.

Papaw

A tree native to tropical America, allied to the passion flower family, and now extensively cultivated…

"A native tree of the United States, growing principally in Michigan, New York, New Jersey and Kansas." -Foster, 1921

Papaw

"A native tree of the United States, growing principally in Michigan, New York, New Jersey and Kansas."…

The flower of the Papaw, Asimina triloba (Keeler, 1915).

Papaw Flower

The flower of the Papaw, Asimina triloba (Keeler, 1915).

The fruit of the Papaw, Asimina triloba (Keeler, 1915).

Papaw Fruit

The fruit of the Papaw, Asimina triloba (Keeler, 1915).

"A South American tree of the natural order Papayaceae of which order about 30 species are known which has now been introduced into many tropical and subtropical countries. It grows to the height of 15-30 feet, with leaves only at the top." — Chambers, 1881

Papaw Tree

"A South American tree of the natural order Papayaceae of which order about 30 species are known which…

"The papaw is a fruit as large as a muskmelon and grows on a tree." —Carpenter, 1902

Papaw Tree

"The papaw is a fruit as large as a muskmelon and grows on a tree." —Carpenter, 1902

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge entire. Outline - long, reverse egg-shape. Apex - pointed, in small leaves, sometimes rounded. Base - taper-pointed or slightly rounded. Leaf - five to ten inches long, thin, rusty downy with young, soon becoming smooth and polished. Bark - slivery-gray, smooth and polished; young shoots downy. Flowers - one and a half inches wide; dark to light, in drooping clusters, appearing with the leaves. March, April. Fruit - about three inches long by one and a half inches thick, egg-shape, yellow, about ten-seeded, fragrant, sweet, and edible. October. Found - from Western New York to Southern Iowa and southward. General Information - A small tree of unpleasant odor when bruised, ten to twenty feet high (or often only a bush) and densely clothed with its long leaves.<p>General Information - A small tree of unpleasant odor when bruised, ten to twenty feet high (or often only a bush) and densely clothed with its long leaves.

Genus Asimina, Adans (Papaw)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge entire. Outline - long, reverse egg-shape. Apex - pointed, in small…

A papya-tree.

Papaya

A papya-tree.

A papya blossom

Papaya

A papya blossom

The papaya or fruit from the Carica Papaya plant.

Papaya

The papaya or fruit from the Carica Papaya plant.

This shows the pendulous strobiles, or fruit, of the Paper Birch, Betula papyrifera, (Keeler, 1915).

Paper Birch Fruit

This shows the pendulous strobiles, or fruit, of the Paper Birch, Betula papyrifera, (Keeler, 1915).

Also known as Betula papyrifera. The branch of a Paper Birch tree, native to northern North America.

Branch of Paper Birch

Also known as Betula papyrifera. The branch of a Paper Birch tree, native to northern North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharply and unequally double-toothed. Outline - egg-shaped. Apex - pointed. Base - rounded, slightly heart-shaped, or, rarely, wedge-shaped. Leaf/Stem - downy. Leaf - two to three inches long; dark green and smooth above; beneath, dull, and with the ribs somewhat hairy, especially in their angles. Bark - of trunk very tough and durable; thick; snow-white on the outside; easily removed from the wood, and then itself very separable into paper-like sheets. The inner sheets are of a reddish tinge. Found - in the mountains of Northern Pennsylvania, New England, and far northward, farther than any other non-evergreen tree of America, excepting the aspen.    General Information - A tree, forty to seventy feet high. The wood is light, hard, and very close-grained, but decays rapidly when exposed - more rapidly than the bark, which often remains as a shell long after the wood within has disappeared. It is very largely used in making spools, pegs, shoe-lasts, in turnery, for wood-pulp, and for fuel. The waterproof bark is much used by Indians and trappers for their canoes. "Give me of your bark, O Birch-Tree! Of your yellow bark, O Birch-Tree! Growing by the rushing river, Tall and stately in the valley! I a light canoe will build me, That shall float upon the river, Like a yellow leaf in autumn, Like a yellow water-lily. 'Lay aside your cloak, O Birch-Tree! Lay aside your white-skin wrapper, For the summer time is coming, And the sun is warm in the heaven, And you need no white-skin wrapper!'" Hiawatha

Genus Betula, L. (Birch)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharply and unequally double-toothed. Outline - egg-shaped. Apex -…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge irregularly sharp-toothed, or, at times unequally and very variously two- to three-lobed. Outline - very nearly that of the Red Mulberry broad egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed (when there are side lobes their ends also pointed). Base - rounded or slightly pointed, rarely, in the small leaves, slightly heart-shaped. Leaf/Stem - rough. Leaf - usually about five inches long, sometimes nine inches; thick, rough above, very velvety-rough. The main ribs are very distinct, and are thickly netted with smaller ones. Bark - light and smoothish. Flowers - in long aments and balls. Fruit - not edible. General Information - An introduced tree, common around houses or escaped from cultivation. A low-branching, large-headed shade tree of medium size, introduced from Japan. In Japan and China the bark of the Paper Mulberry is made into paper, whence the name.

Genus Broussonetia, L'Her.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge irregularly sharp-toothed, or, at times unequally and very variously…

A species of pine native to southern Europe. It is widely known for its edible pine nuts since prehistoric times.

Parasol Pine

A species of pine native to southern Europe. It is widely known for its edible pine nuts since prehistoric…