225 illustrations of trees including: quaking aspen, queensland nut, quince, red birch, red maple, red oak, rock elm, rocky mountain juniper, royal palm, rubber tree, sabal, sago, salix, sand pine, sandalwood, sandbox tree, sapodilla, sapote, sassafras, scarlet oak, scotch pine, screw pine, sequoia, shagbark hickory, silver fir, silver bell, snowdrop, spruce, stone pine, sugar maple, sumac, sweet birch, and sycamore

"Picea, Silver Fir. Fig. 60. Tree, 100-200 ft: trunk 6-8 ft. in dia.: lvs. flat, distichously spreading, dark green and lustrous above, silvery white below: cones slender, cylindrical, light green to dark purple, 5-6 in. long; bracts slightly longer than their scales. Mts. of Cent. and S. Eu., often gregarious.- Wood esteemed and much used; yields Strasburg turpentine. Dwarf forms, with erect and pendulous and with much abbreviated branches, are common in gardens. Not perfectly hardy in New England." L.H. Bailey, 1917

Silver Fir Tree Cone

"Picea, Silver Fir. Fig. 60. Tree, 100-200 ft: trunk 6-8 ft. in dia.: lvs. flat, distichously spreading,…

Also known as the Snowball Tree, the Guelder Rose is a cultivated form of the genus Viburnum, especially <i>V. opulus</i>, with flat cymes of white flowers in summer, and red, globose fruit. The double variety, <i>V. O. sterilis</i>, is the common garden form.

Guelder Rose

Also known as the Snowball Tree, the Guelder Rose is a cultivated form of the genus Viburnum, especially…

Also known as Populus tremuloides. A species of tree native to the cooler areas of North America.

Quaking Aspen

Also known as Populus tremuloides. A species of tree native to the cooler areas of North America.

"The Quassia is a tree cultivated in the West Indies and the parts adjacent. It has terminal clusters of large, red flowers, and unequally pinnate leaves. It comes to this country in logs or billets, and is retained as chips or raspings. It is given as an extract, an infusion, or a tincture. An infusion of it is used to poison flies."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Quassia

"The Quassia is a tree cultivated in the West Indies and the parts adjacent. It has terminal clusters…

Illustrated are parts of the queensland nut, macadamia ternifolia: (a) nut, (b) cross section, and (c) longitudinal section.

Queensland Nut

Illustrated are parts of the queensland nut, macadamia ternifolia: (a) nut, (b) cross section, and (c)…

The branch of a Quercus acuminata tree, a species of oak tree.

Branch of Quercus Acuminata

The branch of a Quercus acuminata tree, a species of oak tree.

The branch of a Quercus brevifolia, a species of oak tree.

Branch of Quercus Brevifolia

The branch of a Quercus brevifolia, a species of oak tree.

The branch of a Quercus heterophylla, a species of oak tree.

Branch of Quercus Heterophylla

The branch of a Quercus heterophylla, a species of oak tree.

The branch of a Quercus hypoleuca, a species of oak.

Branch of Quercus Hypoleuca

The branch of a Quercus hypoleuca, a species of oak.

The branch of a Quercus Minor tree, a species of oak.

Branch of Quercus Minor

The branch of a Quercus Minor tree, a species of oak.

The branch of a Quercus oblongifolia tree, a species of oak.

Branch of Quercua Oblongifolia

The branch of a Quercus oblongifolia tree, a species of oak.

The branch of a Quercus platanoides, a species of oak tree.

Branch of Quercus Platanoides

The branch of a Quercus platanoides, a species of oak tree.

The branch of a Quercus Reticulata, a species of oak tree.

Branch of Quercus Reticulata

The branch of a Quercus Reticulata, a species of oak tree.

The branch of a Quercus undulata tree, a species of oak. Native to the southwestern United States.

Branch of Quercus Undulata

The branch of a Quercus undulata tree, a species of oak. Native to the southwestern United States.

Quince, a member of the rose family. It is said to be a native of Northern Iran.

Quince

Quince, a member of the rose family. It is said to be a native of Northern Iran.

A tree of the apple family. It is native to the western part of Asia, but has been naturalized in many regions and is cultivated extensively for its fruit.

Quince

A tree of the apple family. It is native to the western part of Asia, but has been naturalized in many…

Leaf of the Quince: <em>b</em>, blade; <em>p</em>, petiole; <em>st</em>, stipules.

Quince

Leaf of the Quince: b, blade; p, petiole; st, stipules.

Also known as Cydonia oblonga. It is native to southwest Asia, and produces yellow pear-shaped pome fruits. The flowers tend to be white or pink, and consist of 5 petals.

Quince

Also known as Cydonia oblonga. It is native to southwest Asia, and produces yellow pear-shaped pome…

A pear shaped fruit.

Fruit of Quince

A pear shaped fruit.

Submerged leaves alternate or irregularly borne.

Ranuneulus

Submerged leaves alternate or irregularly borne.

Rattan is a palm native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia.

Rattan

Rattan is a palm native to tropical regions of Africa, Asia and Australasia.

"Pangium edule. 1. a male flower; 2. an ovary with its sterile stamens; 3. a cross section of an ovary; 4. a perpendicular section of a seed." -Lindley, 1853

Raual

"Pangium edule. 1. a male flower; 2. an ovary with its sterile stamens; 3. a cross section of an ovary;…

This is the staminate flower of Red Ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Ash Flower

This is the staminate flower of Red Ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, (Keeler, 1915).

This is the pistillate flower of Red Ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Ash Flower

This is the pistillate flower of Red Ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, (Keeler, 1915).

This is the fruit, or samara, of Red Ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Ash Fruit

This is the fruit, or samara, of Red Ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanica, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets, seven to nine); edge of leaflets nearly entire or slightly toothed. Outline - of leaflet, long oval or egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - somewhat pointed. Leaf/Stem - velvety-downy. Leaflet/Stem - about one fourth of an inch long, or somewhat less, and velvety-downy. Leaf/Bud - rounded, nearly concealed by the leaf-stem, downy, and of a dark, rusty brown. Leaflet - two to six inches long, downy beneath, and pale, becoming reddish. Bark - of the trunk, dark ashy or granite-gray, or of a deep brown. It is slightly furrowed up and does, the furrows seldom joining or crossing. The branches are grayish. The young shoots are velvety, with a grayish or rusty down. Winged seeds - resembling those of the White Ash, but usually with the end of the wing more rounded. Found - along borders of streams and in low and swampy ground - New Brunswick to Minnesota, and southward to Northern Florida and Alabama; but rare west of the Alleghany Mountains. Its finest growth is in the Northern Atlantic States. General Information - A medium-sized tree, usually thirty to fifty feet high, of less value than the White Ash. Fraxinus from a Greek word meaning "separation," because of the ease with which the wood of the Ash can be split. I find in the notes of an old copy of White's "Natural History of Selborne" this comment: "The Ash, I think, has been termed by Gilpin the Venus of British trees." Gerardes' "Herbal" comments: "The leaves of the Ash are of so great a vertue against serpents, as that the serpents dare not be so bolde as to touch the morning and evening shadowes of the tree, but shunneth them afarre off, as Pliny reporteth in his 16 book, 13 chap. He also affirmeth that the serpent being penned in with boughes laide rounde about, will sooner run into the fire, if any be there, than come neere to the boughes of the Ash."In Scandinavian mythology the great and sacred tree, Yggdrasil, the greatest and most sacred of all trees, which binds together heaven and earth and hell, is an Ash. Its roots spread over the whole earth. Its branches reach above the heavens. Underneath lies a serpent; above is an eagle; a squirrel runs up and down the trunk, trying to breed strife between them.

Genus Fraxinus, L. (Ash)

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets, seven to nine); edge of leaflets nearly entire or slightly…

This shows the erect strobile, or fruit, of the Red Birch, Betula nigra, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Birch Fruit

This shows the erect strobile, or fruit, of the Red Birch, Betula nigra, (Keeler, 1915).

Also known as Betula occidentalis. The branch of a Red Birch tree, native to western North America.

Branch of Red Birch

Also known as Betula occidentalis. The branch of a Red Birch tree, native to western North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge unequally double-toothed, entire at base. Outline - egg-shape, often approaching diamond-shape. Apex - pointed. Base - somewhat pointed, often rather blunt wedge-shaped. Leaf/Stem - short (about one half to three fourths of an inch) and downy. Leaf - about three inches long by two inches wide, or often less; whitish and (until old) downy beneath; dotted; in autumn turning to a bright yellow. Bark - of the trunk reddish-brown. As the tree grows the bark becomes torn and loose, hanging in thin shreds of varying shades. The young twigs are downy.  Found - on low grounds, especially along river banks, from Massachusetts westward and southward. It becomes common only in the lower part of New Jersey. Its finest growth is in the South. It is the only birch which grows in a warm climate. General Information - A tree usually thirty to fifty feet high, with the branches long and slender, arched and heavily drooping. Often the branches cover the trunk nearly to the ground. "Birch brooms" are made from the twigs.

Genus Betula, L. (Birch)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge unequally double-toothed, entire at base. Outline - egg-shape, often…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge entire. Outline - round heart-shape. Apex - tapering and rather blunt, sometimes with a short bristle. Base - heart shape. Leaf/Stem - smooth and swollen at each end into a sort of knob. Leaf - usually about four to five inches long and wide; rather thin, smooth above and below; with seven prominent ribs radiating from the end of the leaf-stem. Flowers - reddish, acid, usually abundant in small clusters along the branches; appearing before the leaves. March to May. Fruit - a small, many-seeded, flat pod, winged along the seed-bearing stem. Seeds - reverse egg-shape. Found - in rich soil, Western Pennsylvania, westward and southward. Common in cultivation. General Information - A small and fine ornamental tree, with long, flat-leaved branches. The name "Judas tree" is traditional. "This is the tree whereon Judas did hang himself, and not the elder tree, as it is said." From a Greek word meaning "shuttle," because of the shuttle-shaped pod.

Genus Cercis, L. (Red Bud)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge entire. Outline - round heart-shape. Apex - tapering and rather blunt,…

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their smallness and closeness. They are arranged in four rows up and down the branchlets. In younger or rapidly growing sprouts the leaves are awl-shaped or needle-shaped, somewhat spreading from the branch, very sharp and stiff, placed in pairs (or sometimes in threes), usually about one fourth of an inch long, and with the fine branchlets, which they cover, rounded. In the older and slower-growing trees the leaves are scale-like and overlapping, egg-shape, closely pressed to the branchlets which they cover, and with the branchlets square. As the branchlets grow, the lower scales sometimes lengthen and become dry and chaffy and slightly spreading. Bark - brown and sometimes purplish-tinged, often shredding off with age and leaving the trunk smooth and polished. Berries - about the size of a small pea, closely placed along the branchlets, bluish, and covered with a whitish powder. Found - in Southern Canada, and distributed nearly throughout the United States - more widely than any other of the cone-bearing trees. General information - An evergreen tree, fifteen to thirty feet high (much larger at the South), usually pyramid-shaped, with a rounded base, but varying very greatly, especially near the coast, where it is often twisted and flattened into angular and weird forms. The wood is very valuable, light, straight-grained, durable, fragrant. It is largely used for posts, for cabinet-work, for interior finish, and almost exclusively in the making of lead pencils. The heart-wood is usually a dull red (whence the name), the sap-wood white.  Among the most picturesque objects in the Turkish landscape, standing like sentinels, singly or in groups, and slender and upright as a Lombardy Poplar, are the black cypress trees (C. sempervirens). They mark the sites of graves, often of those which have long since disappeared. In America, more than any other northern tree, the red cedar gives the same sombre effect, whether growing wild or planted in cemeteries. The Common Juniper (J. communis, L.), common as a shrub, is occasionally found in tree form, low, with spreading or drooping branches, and with leaves resembling those of a young Red Cedar, awl-shaped and spreading, but arranged in threes instead of opposite.

Genus Juniperus, L. (Red Cedar)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their smallness and closeness. They are arranged…

Also known as Abies magnifica. Native to the mountains of western North America.

Pine Cone of Red Fir

Also known as Abies magnifica. Native to the mountains of western North America.

Embryo taken out and partly opened.

Red Maple Embryo

Embryo taken out and partly opened.

Seed enlarged, and divided to show the crumpled embryo which fills it.

Red Maple Seed

Seed enlarged, and divided to show the crumpled embryo which fills it.

Leaves - simple; opposite; edge lobed, with the lobes irregularly sharp-toothed and notched. Outline - roundish, with three to five lobes (the lowest pair, if present, the smallest); and with the hollows between the lobes pointed and usually extending less than half-way to the base of the leaf. Apex - of the lobes, pointed. Base - heart-shaped (or sometimes rounded.) Leaf/Stem - long and round. Leaf - (very variable in size and in the toothing and shape of its lobes); whitish beneath. Bark - smoothish; gray, becoming dark and rough with age. Flowers - rich crimson, on short stems in drooping clusters. March, April. Fruit - bright red, smooth, with stems two to three inches long. The wings are about one inch long. At first they approach each other, but afterward are somewhat spreading. September.Found - widely distributed in swamps and along streams especially in all wet forests eastward from the Mississippi to the Atlantic, and from Southern Canada to Florida and Texas. General Information - A tree thirty to sixty feet high, with wood of considerable value, especially when it shows a "curly grain." It is one of the very earliest trees to blossom in the spring, and to show its autumn coloring in the fall.

Genus Acer, L. (Maple)

Leaves - simple; opposite; edge lobed, with the lobes irregularly sharp-toothed and notched. Outline…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge coarsely and somewhat irregularly toothed; or, at times, unequally and very variously two- to three-lobed. Outline - egg shape. Apex - long pointed (when there are side lobes their ends may be rounded). Base - heart-shaped, and more or less one-sided. Leaf - three to seven inches long, rather thin, rough above and downy below, sometimes becoming very smooth. The ribs are very distinct, and whitish below. Bark - grayish, and much broken. Berries - about the size and shape of small blackberries. When ripe they are very dark purple (nearly black), juicy, and sweet. July. Found - from Western New England, westward and southward. General Information - A tree fifteen to twenty-five feet high; in the Middle and Eastern States much larger. It is most common and reaches its finest growth along the lower Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Its wood is valuable, light, and soft, but very durable in contact with the ground. The White Mulberry (M. alba) is sometimes found around old houses and in fields. It was introduced from China, and was formerly cultivated as food for silk-worms. Its leaves resemble those of the Red Mulberry in shape, but are smooth and shining.

Genus Morus, L. (Mulberry)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge coarsely and somewhat irregularly toothed; or, at times, unequally…

These are the fruit of Red Mulberry, Morus rubra, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Mulberry Fruit

These are the fruit of Red Mulberry, Morus rubra, (Keeler, 1915).

Also known as Morus rubra. The branch of a Red Mulberry tree, native to eastern North America, from Ontario and Vermont to southern Florida.

Branch of Red Mulberry

Also known as Morus rubra. The branch of a Red Mulberry tree, native to eastern North America, from…

The leaf of a red oak tree.

Red Oak Leaf

The leaf of a red oak tree.

Red oak tree three years after planting.

Red oak three years after planting

Red oak tree three years after planting.

Leaves simple; alternate; edge lobed (edges of the lobes mostly entire, but slightly toothed toward the ends). Outline - about oval.  Base - short wedge-shape, or rounded. Ends of the lobes and of their one to three slight teeth, pointed and bristle-tipped. Leaf - six to nine inches long, three to five inches wide; both surfaces smooth. Lobes, nine to thirteen, usually very tapering from the base, with the hollows between them rounded and narrow and extending about half way to the middle rib. Bark - of trunk, dark, greenish-gray, and continuing smooth longer than on any other oak, never becoming as rough, for example, as that of the black oak. Acorns - large and stemless, or nearly so. Cup - flat saucer-shape, bulging, very shallow, nearly smooth, with small scales. Nut - about one inch long, somewhat egg-shape; bitter. October. Found - from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick westward and southward. Very common, especially at the North, and extending farther north than any other Atlantic oak. General Information - A tree fifty to eight feet high, with wood that at the East is porous and not durable (though often of better quality westward). It is used for clapboards and in cooperage. The leaves change in the fall to dark red. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves simple; alternate; edge lobed (edges of the lobes mostly entire, but slightly toothed toward…

This shows the cluster of two leaves of the Red Pine, Pinus resinosa, (Keeler, 1915).

Red Pine Needles

This shows the cluster of two leaves of the Red Pine, Pinus resinosa, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches in two-leaved sheathed bunches. Leaf - needle-shape, five to eight inches long; dark, dull, green; rounded and smooth on the outside; on the inside hollowed. Cones - about two to three inches long; rounded at the base; sometimes crowded in large clusters. Scales - not armed with points or knobs. Bark - of the trunk, comparatively smooth and reddish, of a clearer red than that of any other species in the United States. Found - in dry and sandy soil from Newfoundland and the northern shores of the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the Winnipeg River, through the Northern States to Massachusetts, in the mountains of Northern Pennsylvania. Rare in the Eastern States, except in the extreme northern parts of New England. General Information - An evergreen tree fifty to eight feet high, or more, with hard and durable wood, useful for all kinds of construction. It is low-branching and regular in shape. In a note give in confirmation of his estimate of the height of the red pine, Michaux says that when the French in Quebec built the war-ship St. Lawrence, fifty guns, they made its main-mast of this pine.

Genus Pinus, L. (Pine)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches…

Also known as Pinus resinosa. The pine cone of a Red Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Red Pine

Also known as Pinus resinosa. The pine cone of a Red Pine tree.

Also known as Salix laevigata. The branch of a Red Willow tree, native to Pacific Coastal California.

Branch of Red Willow

Also known as Salix laevigata. The branch of a Red Willow tree, native to Pacific Coastal California.

Red-Maple branch, with accessory buds placed side by side. The annular lines toward the base are scars of the bud-scales, and indicate the place of the winter-bud of the preceding year.

Red-Maple branch

Red-Maple branch, with accessory buds placed side by side. The annular lines toward the base are scars…

A Redwood tree in California.

Redwood

A Redwood tree in California.

Also known as Sequoia sempervirens. An evergreen monoecious tree living between 1200-1800 years or more.

Pine Cone of Redwood

Also known as Sequoia sempervirens. An evergreen monoecious tree living between 1200-1800 years or more.

Divisions of plant body fine and many; plant body usualy floating below the surface.

Riccia

Divisions of plant body fine and many; plant body usualy floating below the surface.

Divisions of plant body coarse, two lobed; floating on surface.

Ricciocarpus

Divisions of plant body coarse, two lobed; floating on surface.

Also known as Betula nigra. The branch of a River Birch tree, native to eastern United States.

Branch of River Birch

Also known as Betula nigra. The branch of a River Birch tree, native to eastern United States.

Also known as Ulmus thomasii. The branch of a Rock Elm tree, native to the midwestern United States.

Branch of Rock Elm

Also known as Ulmus thomasii. The branch of a Rock Elm tree, native to the midwestern United States.

Also known as Abies lasiocarpa. A western North American fir.

Pine Cone of Rocky Mountain Fir

Also known as Abies lasiocarpa. A western North American fir.

Also known as Juniperus scopulorum. Native to western North America.

Branch of Rocky Mountain Juniper

Also known as Juniperus scopulorum. Native to western North America.

Roots aid in support and nutrition for the plant.

Root

Roots aid in support and nutrition for the plant.

Roots aid in support and nutrition for the plant.

Root

Roots aid in support and nutrition for the plant.

Also known as Roystonea regia. A species of palm native to southern Florida, Mexico, and parts of Central America.

Branch of Royal Palm

Also known as Roystonea regia. A species of palm native to southern Florida, Mexico, and parts of Central…

This illustration shows a man preparing rubber.

Rubber

This illustration shows a man preparing rubber.

Rubber tree is a tropical tree that contains rubber particles within its secretion.

Rubber tree

Rubber tree is a tropical tree that contains rubber particles within its secretion.

Genus of palm trees including the palmetto of the Southern United States.

Glabra Sabal

Genus of palm trees including the palmetto of the Southern United States.