156 illustrations of trees including: table mountain pine, tallow, tamarack pine, tamarind, torreya, Texas cedar elm, toothbrush tree, tree of heaven, tulip-tree, turkey oak, Virginia pine, walnut, wax myrtle, western hemlock, white pine, white ash, white oak, willow, and yucca

A South American palm that produce a seed for the which the plant is named.

Vegetable Ivory

A South American palm that produce a seed for the which the plant is named.

Also known as Pinus virginiana.

Virginia Pine, Pine Cone

Also known as Pinus virginiana.

Tree with silver bark, common to North America.

Tilia Vulgaris

Tree with silver bark, common to North America.

Walnut, a genus comprising seven or eight species of beautiful trees of the Juglandaceae order.

Walnut

Walnut, a genus comprising seven or eight species of beautiful trees of the Juglandaceae order.

"Walnut is a genus comprising seven or eight species of beautiful trees. The common walnut is a native of Persia and the Himalayas, but has long been cultivated in all parts of the S. of Europe. The date of its introduction is unknown, but it was certainly cultivated by the Romans in the reign of Tiberius. It is a lofty tree of 60 to 90 feet, with large spreading branches. The leaves have two to four pairs of leaflets, and a terminal one."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Walnut

"Walnut is a genus comprising seven or eight species of beautiful trees. The common walnut is a native…

"Accessory buds of butternut. l, leaf-scar; ax, axillary bud; a, a', accessory buds; t, terminal bud." -Bergen, 1896

Walnut Buds

"Accessory buds of butternut. l, leaf-scar; ax, axillary bud; a, a', accessory buds; t, terminal bud."…

This is tree is native to North America, known for its dark wood and edible nuts.

Black Walnut

This is tree is native to North America, known for its dark wood and edible nuts.

The Washington Elm

Washington Elm

The Washington Elm

Also known as Betula fontinalis. A species of birch native to North America.

Branch of Water Birch

Also known as Betula fontinalis. A species of birch native to North America.

Also known as Planera aquatica. The branch of a Water Elm tree, native to the southeastern United States.

Branch of Water Elm

Also known as Planera aquatica. The branch of a Water Elm tree, native to the southeastern United States.

Also known as Hicoria aquatica. The branch of a Water Hickory tree, native to the southeast United States.

Branch of Water Hickory

Also known as Hicoria aquatica. The branch of a Water Hickory tree, native to the southeast United States.

Also known as Quercus nigra. The branch of a Water Oak tree, native to the southeastern United States.

Branch of Water Oak

Also known as Quercus nigra. The branch of a Water Oak tree, native to the southeastern United States.

Also known as Myrica cerifera. A small tree native to North America. It is commonly used for candle-making, as well as a medicinal plant.

Branch of Wax Myrtle

Also known as Myrica cerifera. A small tree native to North America. It is commonly used for candle-making,…

Also known as Juniperus flaccida. A large shrub or small tree native to central and northern Mexico, as well as the extreme southwest of Texas.

Branch of Weeping Juniper

Also known as Juniperus flaccida. A large shrub or small tree native to central and northern Mexico,…

A wheeping tree in a yard

Weeping Tree

A wheeping tree in a yard

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed. Outline - narrow lance-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - pointed. Leaf - about five inches long by three fourths of an inch wide; somewhat silky, or smooth. Branches and branchlets - very long, curved, and drooping nearly to the ground. Introduced - from Europe, now common, and much used in ornamental cultivation. General Information - A tree thirty to forty feet high. The Latin name (babylonica) was suggested by the lament of the Hebrews, in the 137th Psalm. "By the rivers of Babylon there we sat down: Yea we wept when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof." Salix from two Celtic words meaning "near" and "water."

Genus Salix, L. (Willow)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed. Outline - narrow lance-shape. Apex - taper-pointed.…

Also known as Tsuga heterophylla. A species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America.

Pine Cone of Western Hemlock

Also known as Tsuga heterophylla. A species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America.

Also known as Juniperus occidentalis. Native to the western United States.

Branch of Western Juniper

Also known as Juniperus occidentalis. Native to the western United States.

Also known as Thuja plicata. An evergreen coniferous tree native to western North America.

Branch of Western Redcedar

Also known as Thuja plicata. An evergreen coniferous tree native to western North America.

Also known as Platanus racemosa. The branch of a Western Sycamore tree, native to California.

Branch of Western Sycamore

Also known as Platanus racemosa. The branch of a Western Sycamore tree, native to California.

Also known as Pinus monticola. A pine cone of the Western White Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Western White Pine

Also known as Pinus monticola. A pine cone of the Western White Pine tree.

Also known as Alnus rhombifoiia. The branch of a White Alder tree, native to western North America.

Branch of White Alder

Also known as Alnus rhombifoiia. The branch of a White Alder tree, native to western North America.

Samara or key of the White Ash, winged at end.

White Ash

Samara or key of the White Ash, winged at end.

This is the staminate flower of White Ash, Fraxinus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

White Ash Flower

This is the staminate flower of White Ash, Fraxinus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

This is the pistillate flower of White Ash, Fraxinus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

White Ash Flower

This is the pistillate flower of White Ash, Fraxinus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

This is the fruit, or samara, of White Ash, Fraxinus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

White Ash Fruit

This is the fruit, or samara, of White Ash, Fraxinus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets, seven to nine); opposite; edge of leaflets slightly toothed or entire; entire at base. Outline - of leaflet, long oval or long egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - somewhat pointed. Leaf/Stem - smooth. Leaflet/Stem - about one fourth of an inch long, or more; smooth. Leaf/Bud - rusty-colored and smooth. Leaflet - two to six inches long; pale beneath; downy when young, but becoming nearly smooth, except on the ribs. Bark - of the trunk, light gray. In very young trees it is nearly smooth, but it soon becomes deeply furrowed - the furrows crossing each other, and so breaking the bark into irregular, somewhat square or lozenge-shaped plates. Then in very old trees it becomes smooth again, from the scaling off of the plates. The branches are smooth and grayish-green. The young shoots have a polished, deep-green bark, marked with white lines or dots. Winged seeds - one and a half to two inches long, with the "wing" about one fourth of an inch wide, hanging in loose clusters from slender stems. The base of the seed it pointed and not winged. Found - in rich woods, from Southern Canada to Northern Florida and westward. It is most common in the Northern States. The finest specimens are seen in the bottom lands of the lower Ohio River basin. General Information - a tree forty to eighty feet high. Often the trunk rises forty feet without branching. Its tough and elastic timer is of very great value, being widely used in the manufacture of agricultural implements, for oars, and the shafts of carriages, and in cabinet-work. Fraxinus from a Greek word meaning "separation," because of the ease with which the wood of the Ash can be split. I find in the notes of an old copy of White's "Natural History of Selborne" this comment: "The Ash, I think, has been termed by Gilpin the Venus of British trees." Gerardes' "Herbal" comments: "The leaves of the Ash are of so great a vertue against serpents, as that the serpents dare not be so bolde as to touch the morning and evening shadowes of the tree, but shunneth them afarre off, as Pliny reporteth in his 16 book, 13 chap. He also affirmeth that the serpent being penned in with boughes laide rounde about, will sooner run into the fire, if any be there, than come neere to the boughes of the Ash."In Scandinavian mythology the great and sacred tree, Yggdrasil, the greatest and most sacred of all trees, which binds together heaven and earth and hell, is an Ash. Its roots spread over the whole earth. Its branches reach above the heavens. Underneath lies a serpent; above is an eagle; a squirrel runs up and down the trunk, trying to breed strife between them.

Genus Fraxinus, L. (Ash)

Leaves - compound (odd-feathered; leaflets, seven to nine); opposite; edge of leaflets slightly toothed…

Leaves - simple/alternate; edge somewhat irregularly very sharp-toothed. Outline - rounded, often very one-sided. Apex - pointed. Base - strongly heart-shaped. Leaf - five to eight inches long; deep green and shining above, beneath velvety and silvery white with purplish ribs. Bark - of the trunk very thick; on the young branches dark brown. Fruit - gray-downy, ovate, the size of small peas, clustered on a long stem of which the lower half is joined to half the length of a narrow, leaf-like bract, usually with a tapering base. Found - in rich woods, from the mountains of Pennsylvania to Georgia and westward.  General Information - A straight-trunked tree, twenty to thirty feet high (often unbranching to half its height) and two to four feet in diameter. Its very tough inner bark is used for mats and coarse rope. The wood is white and soft and clear of knots. It is much used for wooden ware, in cabinet-work, and for the paneling of carriages, though now less esteemed than the tulip tree for these uses, owing to its liability to crack in bending.

Genus Tilia, L. (Basswood)

Leaves - simple/alternate; edge somewhat irregularly very sharp-toothed. Outline - rounded, often very…

This shows the pendulous strobiles, or fruit, of the White Birch, Betula populifolia, (Keeler, 1915).

White Birch Fruit

This shows the pendulous strobiles, or fruit, of the White Birch, Betula populifolia, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; alternate (often alternate in pairs); edge unequally sharp-toothed, with the base entire. Outline - triangular. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - variable, more or less squared, sometimes slightly hollowed, rounded or pointed. Leaf/Stem - long and slender, about three quarters of an inch or more in length. Leaf - one and three quarters to three inches long. Smooth and shining on both sides. Bark - The outer bark of the mature trunk is chalky-white and thin, but not, like the bark of the Paper-birch, easily separable into layers. Usually it is marked with blackish dots and lines. Often the branchlets and twigs are blackish, and in very young trees the bark may be light reddish-brown, and marked with white dots. Found - on poor soil, from Delaware and Pennsylvania northward (mostly toward the coast), and in ornamental cultivation. It springs up abundantly over burned and abandoned lands. General Information - A slender, short-lived tree, twenty to thirty feet high, with white, soft wood, not durable; used largely in making spools, shoe pegs, etc., and for fuel. A still more graceful cultivated species is the European Weeping Birch (B. pendula). Its branches are very drooping, with more slender leaves, and a spray that is exceedingly light and delicate, especially in early spring.

Genus Betula, L. (Birch)

Leaves - simple; alternate (often alternate in pairs); edge unequally sharp-toothed, with the base entire.…

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their smallness and closeness. They are scale-like, somewhat egg-shape, overlapping each other, and closely pressed in four rows up and down the very flat branchlets. Each leaf has at its centre a raised gland, easily distinguished if held between the eye and the light. Bark - fibrous. The "spray" (formed from the flat branchlets) is itself flat and very delicate and of a dull green. Cones - about one fourth of an inch in diameter, round, variously placed, compact, purplish as they ripen; opening when ripe toward the centre line (i. e., not toward its base). Scales - fleshy, shield-shaped and apparently fastened near their centres, with the edge several-pointed, and with a sharp point or knob in the centre. Seeds - usually four to eight under each scale, oval, with wide wings at the sides. Found - in deep, cold swamps (filling them densely and exclusively), from Southern Maine along the coast to Florida, and along the Gulf coast to Mississippi. General Information - A tapering evergreen tree, thirty to seventy feet high, with light and durable wood, largely used in boat-building, for wooden-ware, shingles, etc.

Genus Chamaecyparis, Spach. (White Cedar)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their smallness and closeness. They are scale-like,…

This is the flowering spray of White Elm, Ulmus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

White Elm Flowers

This is the flowering spray of White Elm, Ulmus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

These are the fruit, or samara, of White Elm, Ulmus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

White Elm Fruit

These are the fruit, or samara, of White Elm, Ulmus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

These are the unfolding leaves of White Elm, Ulmus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

White Elm Leaves

These are the unfolding leaves of White Elm, Ulmus americana, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharply and often doubly toothed. Outline - oval or egg-shaped, or inversely egg-shaped; always one-sided. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - rounded, or slightly heart-shaped, rarely pointed. Leaf/Stem - about one quarter inch long. Buds - smooth. Leaf - usually two to five inches long, and one and a half to two and a half wide; somewhat downy when young, afterward roughish below; above, either rough in one direction, or (especially if taken from the ends of the long branches) smooth and shining. Ribs - prominent and straight. Bark - of the branches not marked with "corky ridges"; branchlets, smooth. Seeds - flat egg-shaped or oval, winged and fringed all around. Last of May.  Found - northward to Southern Newfoundland; southward to Florida; westward to the Black Hills of Dakota. Toward the western and southwestern limits it is found only in the river-bottom lands. General Information - One of the very noblest of American trees, eighty feet or more in height, and of strong and graceful proportions. The trunk divides at a slight angle into two or three arching limbs, and these again into many smaller curving and drooping branches. The trunk and the larger branches are often heavily fringed with short and leafy boughs. The tree is widely cultivated. Streets planted with it become columned and arched like the aisles of a Gothic cathedral. The wood is hard, and very tough from the interlacing of its fibers. It is used in making saddle-trees and for wheel-hubs, and is now largely exported to England to be used in boat- and ship-building. One day I found four men in a stone quarry, working with iron bars and rollers over a heavy flat slab. They were moving the stone slowly up a narrow plant into their cart. "John, " I said, "I would not think that board could hold a stone of such weight two minutes. Is it hickory?" "No sir, " said John, " that's an elm plank; it can't break." It did not break. It was one of the woods which the Deacon used in building his famous "one-hoss shay": So the deacon inquired of the village folk Where he could find the strongest oak, That count n't be split nor bent nor broke, - That was for spokes and floor and sills; He sent for lancewood to make the thills; The cross-bars were ash, from the straightest trees; The panels of whitewood, that cuts like cheese, But lasts like iron for thing like these; The hubs of logs from the Settler's Ellum; - Last of its timber, - they could n't sell 'em, Never an axe had seen their chips, And the wedges flew from between their lips, Their blunt ends frizzled like celery-tips;" --Oliver Wendell Holmes

Genus Ulmus, L. (Elm)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharply and often doubly toothed. Outline - oval or egg-shaped, or…

Also known as Abies concolor. Native to the mountains of western North America.

Pine Cone of White Fir

Also known as Abies concolor. Native to the mountains of western North America.

The leaf of a white oak tree.

White Oak Leaf

The leaf of a white oak tree.

The leaf of a white oak tree.

White Oak Leaf

The leaf of a white oak tree.

Also known as Quercus alba. The branch of a White Oak tree, native to eastern North America.

Branch of White Oak

Also known as Quercus alba. The branch of a White Oak tree, native to eastern North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge lobed; (edge of the lobes entire or sometimes coarsely notched and hollowed at their ends.) Outline - reverse egg-shape. Apex - of lobes, rounded. Base - wedge-shape. Leaf - quite variable in size and shape; four to seven inches long; smooth; pale beneath; the lobes oftenest five to nine, long and narrow, and sometimes widening toward the end, but at other times only three to five, short and broad, and radiating obliquely from the middle rub. Bark - of trunk, slightly roughened (comparatively smooth for an oak), light-gray; in older trees loosening in large, thin scales; the inner bark white. Acorns - usually in pairs on a stem one fourth of an inch or more in length. Cup - rounded saucer-shape, not scaly, but rough and warty and much shorter than the nut. Nut - three fourths to one inch long, slightly egg-shape or oval; brown, sweet, and edible. October. Found - from Ontario and the valley of the St. Lawrence southward to Florida, and westward to Southeastern Minnesota, Arkansas, and Texas. Its finest growth is on the western slopes of the Alleghany Mountains, and in the Ohio basin. General Information - A noble tree, sixty to eighty feet or more in height, with hard, touch wood of very great value in many kinds of manufacturing, and for fuel. The withered, light-brown leaves often cling throughout the winter. The "oak-apples" or "galls" often found on oak-trees are the work of 'gall-flies" and their larvae. When green tiny worms will usually be found at their centre. Quaint reference is made to these galls in Gerardes' "Herbal": "Oak-apples being broken in sunder before they have an hole thorough them do fore shewe the sequell of the yeere. If they conteine in them a flie, then warre insueth; if a creeping worme, then scarcitie of victuals; if a running spider, then followeth great sickness or mortalitie." The oak, probably more than any other tree, has been associated with workshop of the gods. The "Talking Tree" of the sanctuary in Dodona (the oldest of all the Hellenic sanctuaries, and second in repute only to that at Delphi) was an oak. Oak groves were favorite places for altars and temples of Jupiter. The Druids worshipped under the oak-trees. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge lobed; (edge of the lobes entire or sometimes coarsely notched and…

A leaf from the white or gray birch.

White or Gray Birch Leaf

A leaf from the white or gray birch.

This shows the cluster of five leaves of the White Pine, Pinus strobus, (Keeler, 1915).

White Pine Needles

This shows the cluster of five leaves of the White Pine, Pinus strobus, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches in five-leaved bunches, with their sheaths lacking or very short, excepting when young. Leaf - needle-shape, three to five inches long, light bluish-green, three-sided, soft, and very slender. Cones - four to six inches long, cylinder-shape, about one inch in diameter before the scales loosen; solitary, drooping, slightly curved. Scales - thin, without prickles. Bark - of trunk, lighter than in the other pines; in young trees smooth, and only slightly rough when older. Found - from Newfoundland to the Winnipeg River, southward through the Northern States, and along the Alleghany Mountains to Georgia. Its finest growth is in the region of the Great Lakes. General Information - An evergreen tree of soft and delicate foliage, eighty to one hundred and fifty feet high; one of the most valuable timber trees of any country. The wood is clear of knots, straight-grained, and soft, and is used in immense quantities for building and many kinds of manufacturing. The branches are given off in flat, regular whorls around the straight trunk.

Genus Pinus, L. (Pine)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches…

An illustration of the winged seed of the white pine.

Winged Seed of White Pine

An illustration of the winged seed of the white pine.

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged singly all around the branchlets. Leaf - needle-shaped, five twelfths to three fourths of an inch long, four-sided, curved, sharp, rather slender, bluish-green, much lighter than the leaf of the Black Spruce. Bark - lighter than that of the Black Spruce. Cones - one to two inches long, and always in the proportion of about two inches in length to one half or three fourths of an inch in thickness; drooping at the ends of the branchlets; long oval or cylinder-shape; pale green when young, becoming brownish as they ripen. Scales - broad reverse egg-shape, with an entire edge, and rounded or somewhat two-lobed at the apex. Found - in Maine, Northeastern Vermont, Northern Michigan, Minnesota, and far northward, on low ground and in swamps. It is most common north of the United States boundaries. General Information - An evergreen tree, forty to seventy feet high. One of the most important of the Northern timber trees.

Genus Picea, Link. (Spruce)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged singly all around the…

Leaves - simple; alternate (and in alternate bunches); edge unevenly sharp-toothed (with five to nine deep cuts almost forming small lobes). Outline - rounded egg-shape Apex - pointed Base - usually slightly pointed, but often blunt or slightly heart-shape. Leaf/Stem - slender and often with small wart-like glands. Leaf - usually one and a half to two and a half inches long, but of variable size on the same tree; thin; smooth; shining. Branchlets - greenish, or whitish and shining, as though washed with silver. Thorns - one to two inches long, stout, often whitish, usually slightly curved. Flowers - about two thirds of an inch across; white (often with a rosy tinge); twelve or so in a bunch; with a strong and rather disagreeable odor. May. Fruit - nearly one half inch in diameter; rounded or egg-shape; bright red; with thin pulp and one to five stones; somewhat edible. September Found - through the Atlantic forests southward to Northern Florida and Eastern Texas. General Information - A low tree (or often a bush), ten to twenty feet high, with crooked, spreading branches; very common at the North; rare in the South. From a Greek word meaning strength.

Genus Crataegus, L. (Thorn)

Leaves - simple; alternate (and in alternate bunches); edge unevenly sharp-toothed (with five to nine…

Also known as Juglans cinerea. A species of walnut native to the eastern United States and southeast Canada.

Branch of White Walnut Tree

Also known as Juglans cinerea. A species of walnut native to the eastern United States and southeast…

Staminate catkin from a white willow <em>(Salix alba)</em>.

White Willow

Staminate catkin from a white willow (Salix alba).

Pistillate catkin from a white willow <em>(Salix alba)</em>.

White Willow

Pistillate catkin from a white willow (Salix alba).

A staminate flower from a white willow <em>(Salix alba)</em>.

White Willow

A staminate flower from a white willow (Salix alba).

A pistillate flower from a white willow <em>(Salix alba)</em>.

White Willow

A pistillate flower from a white willow (Salix alba).

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed, with the teeth somewhat thickened. Outline - narrow lance-shape. Apex - tapered-pointed. Base - pointed. Leaf - about five inches long, three quarters of an inch wide; surface with white silky hairs beneath, and often above; branches not yellow, and very brittle at the base.

Genus Salix, L. (Willow)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed, with the teeth somewhat thickened. Outline - narrow…

Also known as Pinus albicaulis. A pine cone from a Whitebark Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Whitebark Pine

Also known as Pinus albicaulis. A pine cone from a Whitebark Pine tree.

A leaf from a whitewood or tulip tree.

Whitewood Leaf

A leaf from a whitewood or tulip tree.

The leaves and fruit of the wild black cherry tree.

Wild Black Cherry

The leaves and fruit of the wild black cherry tree.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge toothed (with the points of the teeth so incurved as to appear blunt), and often finely "crinkled." Outline - usually long oval or long egg-shape. Apex - pointed. Base - rounded or slightly pointed. Leaf/Stem - usually with two to five tooth-like glands near the base of the leaf. Leaf - two to five inches long; thickish; polished, and of a deep shining green above; beneath, lighter and smooth, with the middle rib sometimes downy toward the base. In the autumn the leaves turn to orange and later to pale yellow. Bark - of old trunks, blackish and rough; of young trunks and on the larger branches, reddish or purplish brown; marked with scattered lines; on young shoots, at first green or olive brown, gradually becoming darker, and sprinkled (sic) with small orange dots. Flowers - white, with short stems, closely set in a long, cylinder-shaped cluster. May, June. Fruit - about one and a quarter inches in diameter; with short stems (one and a quarter to one and a third inches ) hanging in long, close clusters from the ends of the twigs. It is nearly black when ripe, and of a pleasant flavor though somewhat bitter; it is eagerly eaten by birds. August. Found - very widely distributed north, south, and west. It reaches its finest growth on the western slopes of the Alleghany Mountains. General Information - A tree fifty to eighty feet high. The wood is light and hard, of a brown or reddish tinge, becoming darker with exposure, and of very great value in cabinet work and interior finish. It is now becoming scarce, so that stained birch is often used as a substitute. The bitter aromatic bark is used as a valuable tonic; "cherry brandy" is made from the fruit.

Genus Prunus L. (Cherry, Plum)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge toothed (with the points of the teeth so incurved as to appear blunt),…

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed. Outline - long oval to reverse egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - pointed or rounded. Leaf/Stem - one fourth to one half inch long, smooth, reddish, usually with two small wart-like glands on the raised border near the base of the leaf. Leaf - two to three inches long; smooth when mature; "net-veined," with distinct furrows over the ribs; somewhat downy on the ribs and in their angles. Bark - of trunk very dark reddish-green or bronze-green, resembling that of a cherry-tree. Fruit - one half to two thirds inch in diameter; broad oval; yellow, orange, or red; with a thick and acid skin and a pleasant flavor. August. Stone - slightly flattened, and with both edges winged and sharp.  Found - from Canada southward to Florida and westward, and often in cultivation. General Information - A small tree (sometimes a bush), eight to twenty feet high, with hard, reddish wood. In cultivation it forms an excellent stock on which to graft the domestic plums.

Genus Prunus L. (Cherry, Plum)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed. Outline - long oval to reverse egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed.…

Leaves - simple; alternate, or alternate in pairs; edge finely and sharply toothed. Outline - narrow egg-shape. Apex - taper-pointed. Base - rounded or slightly pointed. Leaf/Stem - grooved above. Leaf - two to six inches long, shining and smooth and of about the same shade of green on both sides. Bark - reddish-brown and smooth, with swollen, rusty-colored dots, and usually stripping, like that of the garden cherry, around the trunk. Flowers - white, on stems about one inch or more in length, in nearly stemless clusters. May. Fruit - the size of a large pea, light red, on long stems (about three fourths to one inch long), sour, in clusters of two to five at the sides of the branches, and usually from the base of the leaf-stems; seldom abundant. July. Found - Common in all northern forests. In Northern New England it quickly occupies burned-out pine regions. General Information - A slender tree, usually twenty to twenty-five feet high, of no value as timber.

Genus Prunus L. (Cherry, Plum)

Leaves - simple; alternate, or alternate in pairs; edge finely and sharply toothed. Outline - narrow…

A class of shrubs or trees of the genus salix, varying in size from shrubs of only a few inches in height to trees forty to seventy-five feet high.

Willow

A class of shrubs or trees of the genus salix, varying in size from shrubs of only a few inches in height…

Willow, any species of the genus Salix.

Willow

Willow, any species of the genus Salix.