156 illustrations of trees including: table mountain pine, tallow, tamarack pine, tamarind, torreya, Texas cedar elm, toothbrush tree, tree of heaven, tulip-tree, turkey oak, Virginia pine, walnut, wax myrtle, western hemlock, white pine, white ash, white oak, willow, and yucca

"Ament-A kind of inflorescence consisting of unisexual apetalous flowers growing in the axils of scales or bracts ranged along a talk or axis."-Whitney, 1902

Willow

"Ament-A kind of inflorescence consisting of unisexual apetalous flowers growing in the axils of scales…

"Willlow (Salix). Leafy branch, bearing two pistillate catkins. Staminate flower above, at the left; pistillate flower below, at the right." -Gager, 1916

Willow Branch

"Willlow (Salix). Leafy branch, bearing two pistillate catkins. Staminate flower above, at the left;…

An illustration of a willow branch.

Willow Branch

An illustration of a willow branch.

"Catkins of willow. A, staminate flowers; B, pistillate flowers." -Bergen, 1896

Willow Catkin

"Catkins of willow. A, staminate flowers; B, pistillate flowers." -Bergen, 1896

This shows the staminate flower of the Willow, (Keeler, 1915).

Willow Flower

This shows the staminate flower of the Willow, (Keeler, 1915).

This shows the pistillate flower of the Willow, (Keeler, 1915).

Willow Flower

This shows the pistillate flower of the Willow, (Keeler, 1915).

"Flowers of willow. A, staminate flower; B, pistillate flower." -Bergen, 1896

Willow Flowers

"Flowers of willow. A, staminate flower; B, pistillate flower." -Bergen, 1896

"Leaf of a willow (Salix sp.). b, blade; p, petiole; s, stipules." -Gager, 1916

Willow Leaf

"Leaf of a willow (Salix sp.). b, blade; p, petiole; s, stipules." -Gager, 1916

Leaves of the willow tree.

Willow Leaves

Leaves of the willow tree.

Also known as Quercus phellos. The branch of a Willow Oak tree, native to eastern North America.

Branch of Willow Oak

Also known as Quercus phellos. The branch of a Willow Oak tree, native to eastern North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge entire. Outline - long and narrow. Apex - pointed and bristle-tipped. Base - pointed. Leaf - three to four inches long (sometimes five); one half to seven eighths of an inch wide; rather thick and stiff; smooth and shining above; somewhat dull beneath; very young leaves, light green above and soft, white-downy beneath. Bark - thick and smoothish. Acorns - small. nearly stemless. Cup - rather shallow, saucer-shaped, or somewhat rounded top-shape. Nut - about three eighths of an inch long, rounded, brown; Kernel, bitter and bright orange. October. Found - from Staten Island and New Jersey southward along the coast to Northeastern Florida and the Gulf States, and from Kentucky southwestward. Usually on the borders of swamps and in sandy woods. General Information - a tree thirty to fifty feet high, with poor wood. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge entire. Outline - long and narrow. Apex - pointed and bristle-tipped.…

Large willow tree of Eurasia and North Africa having greyish canescent leaves and grey bark

White Willow

Large willow tree of Eurasia and North Africa having greyish canescent leaves and grey bark

The leaf of a willow-oak tree.

Willow-Oak Leaf

The leaf of a willow-oak tree.

These are the fruit, or samara, of Winged Elm, Ulmus alata, (Keeler, 1915).

Winged Elm Fruit

These are the fruit, or samara, of Winged Elm, Ulmus alata, (Keeler, 1915).

Also known as Ulmus alata. The branch of a Winged Elm tree, native to the southern United States.

Branch of Winged Elm

Also known as Ulmus alata. The branch of a Winged Elm tree, native to the southern United States.

"Winged fruits. I, elm; II, maple." -Bergen, 1896

Winged Fruits

"Winged fruits. I, elm; II, maple." -Bergen, 1896

Also known as Hamamelis virginiana. The branch of a Witch Hazel shrub, native to the eastern United States.

Branch of Witch Hazel

Also known as Hamamelis virginiana. The branch of a Witch Hazel shrub, native to the eastern United…

A tree belonging to the East Indies and the Malayan and Polynesian islands, remarkable for its fragrance. Its wood is used as a perfume, and is manufactured into glove-boxes and other light articles.

Sandal Wood

A tree belonging to the East Indies and the Malayan and Polynesian islands, remarkable for its fragrance.…

View of the woods

Woods

View of the woods

This shows the erect strobile, or fruit, of the Yellow Birch, Betula lutea (Keeler, 1915).

Yellow Birch Fruit

This shows the erect strobile, or fruit, of the Yellow Birch, Betula lutea (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; alternate (often alternate in pairs); edge very sharply, unequally, and rather coarsely toothed. Outline - egg-shape. Apex - pointed. Base - narrowed and heart-shaped. Leaf/Stem - short and downy. Leaf - about four by two and one fourth inches, or often smaller, thin' downy when young, becoming smooth. Ribs - straight. Bark - outer bark of trunk thin and a silvery yellow, and separating into narrow ribbons curling outwards at the ends. The twigs and the bark are sweet-tasting and aromatic, but less so than in the "Sweet Birch."  Found - in moist woods, along the Alleghany Mountains, in Delaware and Southern Minnesota, and northward into Canada. General Information - A tree forth to eight feet or often more in height; one of the largest and most valuable non-evergreen trees of New England and Canada. Its hard, close-grained wood is largely used for fuel, in making furniture, button-moulds, wheel-hubs, pill-boxes, etc.

Genus Betula, L. (Birch)

Leaves - simple; alternate (often alternate in pairs); edge very sharply, unequally, and rather coarsely…

Also known as Betula lenta. The branch of a Yellow Birch tree, native to eastern North America.

Branch of Yellow Birch

Also known as Betula lenta. The branch of a Yellow Birch tree, native to eastern North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge evenly and sharply (or sometime bluntly) toothed. Outline - very narrow oval (or sometimes wide). Apex - taper-pointed. Base - pointed or blunt. Leaf/Stem - three fourths to one inch long. Leaf - usually about five to seven inches long, by one and one half to two inches wide, but sometimes so wide as to resemble Q. prinus), from which, however, it is distinguished by its think bark. Of all the "chestnut-oak: leaves it most closely resembles the chestnut leaf. It is smooth above, whitish and minutely downy beneath. Bark - of trunk, light, flaky, and thin. Acorn - nearly stemless. Cup - about five twelfths to seven twelfths of an inch across; rounded; thin, with very small, closely pressed scales. Nut - seven twelfths to nine twelfths of an inch long; egg-shape or narrow oval, light brown, about one third covered by cup; sweet. October. Found - from Massachusetts to Delaware, along the mountains to Northern Alabama and westward. Very common west of the Alleghany Mountains. General Information - A tree forty to sixty feet high, with strong and durable wood. Quercus, possible from a Celtic word meaning to inquire, because it was among the oaks that the Druids oftenest practised their rites.

Genus Quercus, L. (Oak)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge evenly and sharply (or sometime bluntly) toothed. Outline - very narrow…

A yellow locust leaf.

Yellow Locust Leaf

A yellow locust leaf.

This shows the cluster of two leaves, sometimes three of four, of the Yellow Pine, Pinus echinata, (Keeler, 1915).

Yellow Pine Needles

This shows the cluster of two leaves, sometimes three of four, of the Yellow Pine, Pinus echinata, (Keeler,…

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches in two-leaved sheathed bunches (On vigorous young shoots the leaves are sometimes clustered in threes, not on the old branches.) Leaf - needle-shape, two and a half to five inches long, usually four to five inches; dark green; slender; rounded on the outer side; on the inner side, hollowed. Cone - about two to three inches long, in old trees scarcely more than one and a half inches long; the smallest of the American Pine cones; surface roughened by the slightly projecting ends of the scales; not growing in large clusters. Scales - tipped with a weak prickle pointing outward.Found - in Staten Island and New Jersey, and southward to Western Florida; through the Gulf States, Arkansas, and parts of Kansas, Missouri, and Illinois. General Information - An evergreen tree forty to eighty feet high, with straight trunk, regular branches, and pyramid-shaped head. The timber is hard and very valuable, second in value (among the Yellow Pines) only to the "Georgia Pine" (P. palustris -" Long-leaved Pine," "Southern Pine").

Genus Pinus, L. (Pine)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches…

Also known as Liriodendron tulipifera. A branch of a Yellow Poplar tree, native throughout North America.

Branch of Yellow Poplar

Also known as Liriodendron tulipifera. A branch of a Yellow Poplar tree, native throughout North America.

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed, with the teeth somewhat thickened. Outline - narrow lance-shape. Apex - taper-pointed; in the young leaves often broad and rounded. Base - pointed. Leaf - small (two to three and a half inches long; about one half to five eighths of an inch wide); surface with white, silky hairs beneath and often above, especially in the young leaves. Branches - brittle at the base, smooth and shining and yellow. Blossoms - in May. Introduced - from Europe, but now found throughout the United States. Common around houses and in low grounds. General Information - Introduced from Europe, but now common around houses and in low grounds. A very large and familiar tree (fifty to eighty feet high), one of the largest of the Willows; low-branching; thick-set, of tough and rapid growth. A stake set in the ground grows readily. The silvery look of the tree (especially in a strong wind) is due to the gloss of its downy leaves. Salix from two Celtic words meaning "near" and "water." The Blue Willow (var. caerulea S.) is naturalized in Massachusetts.

Genus Salix, L. (Willow)

Leaves - simple; alternate; edge sharp-toothed, with the teeth somewhat thickened. Outline - narrow…

"Taxus baccata loaded with male flowers; 1. a male flower; 2. an anther; 3. a female flower; 4. a vertical section of an ovule; 5. a ripe fruit; 6. of a ripe seed, showing the embryo." -Lindley, 1853

European Yew

"Taxus baccata loaded with male flowers; 1. a male flower; 2. an anther; 3. a female flower; 4. a vertical…

"Saxe-Gothea conspicua; 1. male spike; 2. anther; 3. scale of galbulus with ovule; 4. ripe galbulus." -Lindley, 1853

Prince Albert's Yew

"Saxe-Gothea conspicua; 1. male spike; 2. anther; 3. scale of galbulus with ovule; 4. ripe galbulus."…

Also known as Salix taxifolia. The branch of a Yewleaf Willow, native to southern Mexico and the Pacific Coast.

Branch of Yewleaf Willow

Also known as Salix taxifolia. The branch of a Yewleaf Willow, native to southern Mexico and the Pacific…

Illustrated is a young date palm with growing suckers or offshoots. It is native to North Africa and the Middle East.

Young Date Palm

Illustrated is a young date palm with growing suckers or offshoots. It is native to North Africa and…

Shown is the beauty of young evergreens. The beauty lies in their symmetry and the preservation of the lower limbs.

Young Evergreens

Shown is the beauty of young evergreens. The beauty lies in their symmetry and the preservation of the…

"A plant may be operated on wherever the stem has become firm and woody; the top will not fail to make a fine young specimen plant, which migt be removed in the course of abot twelve months, while other shoots would no doubt be obtained from the old stem, which, with its head thus removed, might be removed to quarters where steadying if the stem were loaded with a pot or box of soil, as at a in the figure." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Yucca

"A plant may be operated on wherever the stem has become firm and woody; the top will not fail to make…

A leaf of the Zamia, a tree from the Mesozoic time.

Zamia Leaf

A leaf of the Zamia, a tree from the Mesozoic time.

"Zizyphus Baclei. 1. a flower seen from above; 2. a fruit; 3. the same cut vertically; 4. a seed divided vertically." -Lindley, 1853

Ziziphus

"Zizyphus Baclei. 1. a flower seen from above; 2. a fruit; 3. the same cut vertically; 4. a seed divided…