143 illustrations of pine trees including: balsam fir, bishop pine, California torreya,, Caribbean pine, coulter pine, douglas fir, gray pine, incense cedar, Jersey pine, juniper, kauri pine, knobcone pine, lablolly pine, longleaf pine, pitch pine, scotch pine, scots pine, scots pine, sequoia, shasta red fir, shortleaf pine, spruce, stone pine, sugar pine, table mountain pine, Turkish pine, and white fir as well as pine cones, needles, and seedlings

"Fig. 61- Cones of Abies- From bottom to top, A. concolor (White Fir), A. Nordmanniana (Nordmann Fir), A. Magnifica (red Fir)." L. H> Bailey, 1917

Cones of Abies

"Fig. 61- Cones of Abies- From bottom to top, A. concolor (White Fir), A. Nordmanniana (Nordmann Fir),…

"A suborder of the natural order <em> Conifer&aelig;</em>, distinguished by bearing strobiles (cones) with two inverted ovules at the base of each scale, which become ovules at the base of each scale, which become winged samaroid seeds."-Wright, 1902

Abietineæ

"A suborder of the natural order Coniferæ, distinguished by bearing strobiles (cones)…

An illustration of an Agathis branch. The genus Agathis, commonly known as kauri or dammar, is a relatively small genus of 21 species of evergreen trees in the very ancient Araucariaceae family of conifers. While initially widespread during the Jurassic period they are now found only in small areas of the southern hemisphere. The trees have characteristically very large trunks and little or no branching for some way up. Young trees are normally conical in shape, only upon maturity does the crown become more rounded or irregularly shaped.

Agathis Branch

An illustration of an Agathis branch. The genus Agathis, commonly known as kauri or dammar, is a relatively…

The araucaria excelsa is commonly known as the Norfolk Island Pine. The leaves are sharply pointed, also known as awl-shaped. The leaves are bright green and densely pakced.

Araucaria Excelsa Tree

The araucaria excelsa is commonly known as the Norfolk Island Pine. The leaves are sharply pointed,…

One of the scales or carpels of the American Arbor-Vitae, the inside exposed to view, showing a pair of ovules on its base.

Arbor-Vitae

One of the scales or carpels of the American Arbor-Vitae, the inside exposed to view, showing a pair…

An image of a bald cypress, in pyramidal cultivated form. It is otherwise known as taxodium distichum, and is native to the southeastern United States.

Bald Cypress in Cultivated Form

An image of a bald cypress, in pyramidal cultivated form. It is otherwise known as taxodium distichum,…

An image of a bald cypress in swamp form, with aerating roots, or knees. It is otherwise known as taxodium distichum, and is native to the southeastern United States.

Bald Cypress in Swamp Form

An image of a bald cypress in swamp form, with aerating roots, or knees. It is otherwise known as taxodium…

Also known as Taxodium distichum. A species of conifer native to the southeastern United States.

Pine Cone of Bald Cypress

Also known as Taxodium distichum. A species of conifer native to the southeastern United States.

Leaves - Simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged singly up and down the branchlets, at first radiating about equally on every side, afterward flattened into two ranks, as in the Hemlock. Leaf - one half to one inch long, narrow; apex blunt or notched; edge entire; flat, with a grooved line above and a corresponding raised line below; bright green above; silvery white below. Bark - smooth and unbroken (especially when young), and usually covered with "blisters." Cones - two to four inches long, one inch broad, erect, at the sides of the branchlets; violet-colored. Scales - thin and flat, broad and rounded. The thin bracts between the scales are tipped with a slender bristle. The cone falls apart when ripe. Found - from the far North through the Northern States to Pennsylvania, and along the Alleghany Mountains to the high peaks of West Virginia. Common northward in damp forests. General Information - A slender, evergreen tree, twenty to sixty feet high; pyramid-shaped, with regular horizontal branches; its wood is very light and soft. From the "blisters," which form under the bark of the trunk and branches, the valuable Canada balsam is obtained. The tree is short-lived, and therefore of less value in cultivation.

Genus Abies, Link. (Fir)

Leaves - Simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged singly up and down the…

Also known as Abies balsamea. A North American fir, generally found in most of the eastern and central areas of the United States and Canada.

Pine Cone of Balsam Fir

Also known as Abies balsamea. A North American fir, generally found in most of the eastern and central…

Also known as Sequoia wellington.

Pine Cone of Big Tree

Also known as Sequoia wellington.

A drawing of the "big trees" first observed in California.

Big Trees of California

A drawing of the "big trees" first observed in California.

Also known as Pseudotsuga macrocarpa. A conifer native to southern California.

Pine Cone of Bigcone Douglas Fir

Also known as Pseudotsuga macrocarpa. A conifer native to southern California.

Also known as Torreya californica.

Branch of California Torreya

Also known as Torreya californica.

Also known as Pinus caribaea. The pine cone of a Caribbean Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Caribbean Pine

Also known as Pinus caribaea. The pine cone of a Caribbean Pine tree.

Also known as Tsuga caroliniana. An evergreen coniferous tree native to the Appalachian Mountains.

Pine Cone of Carolina Hemlock

Also known as Tsuga caroliniana. An evergreen coniferous tree native to the Appalachian Mountains.

Also known as Juniperus communis. It is generally found throughout the Northern Hemisphere.

Branch of Common Juniper

Also known as Juniperus communis. It is generally found throughout the Northern Hemisphere.

Each scale of the pine cone is a whole pistillate flower. (Gray, 1858).

Cone

Each scale of the pine cone is a whole pistillate flower. (Gray, 1858).

"Cone.--A particular kind of compound fruit, such as that of the pine tribe." -Newman, 1850

Cone

"Cone.--A particular kind of compound fruit, such as that of the pine tribe." -Newman, 1850

Seeds falling from a cone

Cone Seeds

Seeds falling from a cone

A cone of seeds from a pine tree.

Pine Cone

A cone of seeds from a pine tree.

"Fig. 60. Cones of Abies - From bottom to top, A. grandis (Grand Fir), A. Balsamea (Balsam Fir), A. Picea (Silver Fir)." L.H. Bailey, 1917

Fir Tree Cones

"Fig. 60. Cones of Abies - From bottom to top, A. grandis (Grand Fir), A. Balsamea (Balsam Fir), A.…

Also known as Pinus coulteri. The pine cone of a Coulter Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Coulter Pine

Also known as Pinus coulteri. The pine cone of a Coulter Pine tree.

A popular name of coniferous trees of the genus cupressus.

Cypress

A popular name of coniferous trees of the genus cupressus.

A Weeping Golden Japanese Cypress.

Cypress

A Weeping Golden Japanese Cypress.

"Branch and Fruit of the Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)." &mdash; Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Cypress

"Branch and Fruit of the Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens)." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Abies Balsamea (Balsam Fir) or Balm of Gilead Fir, lvs. dark green and lustrous above, pale below, rounded or obtusely short pointed and occasionally emarginate, acute or acuminate on fertile branches: cones oblong, cylindrical, purple, 2&1/2-4 in. long; bracts shorter or rarely slightly longer than their scales." L.H. Bailey, 1917

Balsam Fir Tree Cone

Abies Balsamea (Balsam Fir) or Balm of Gilead Fir, lvs. dark green and lustrous above, pale below, rounded…

"A. grandis (Grand Fir) - Fig. 60.- tree, 200-300ft.: trunk becoming 4ft. in diam. lvs. thin and flexable, deeply grooved, very dark green above and silvery white beneath: cones cylindrical, 2-4 in. long, rounded or retuse at the apex, the broad scales somewhat squarrose and irregularly serrate and furnished with a short point." L.H. Bailey, 1917

Grand Fir Tree Cone

"A. grandis (Grand Fir) - Fig. 60.- tree, 200-300ft.: trunk becoming 4ft. in diam. lvs. thin and flexable,…

"Picea, Silver Fir. Fig. 60. Tree, 100-200 ft: trunk 6-8 ft. in dia.: lvs. flat, distichously spreading, dark green and lustrous above, silvery white below: cones slender, cylindrical, light green to dark purple, 5-6 in. long; bracts slightly longer than their scales. Mts. of Cent. and S. Eu., often gregarious.- Wood esteemed and much used; yields Strasburg turpentine. Dwarf forms, with erect and pendulous and with much abbreviated branches, are common in gardens. Not perfectly hardy in New England." L.H. Bailey, 1917

Silver Fir Tree Cone

"Picea, Silver Fir. Fig. 60. Tree, 100-200 ft: trunk 6-8 ft. in dia.: lvs. flat, distichously spreading,…

Also known as Libocedrus decurrens.

Branch of Incense Cedar

Also known as Libocedrus decurrens.

This shows the cluster of two leaves, bright green, of the Jersey Pine, Pinus virginiana, (Keeler, 1915).

Jersey Pine Needles

This shows the cluster of two leaves, bright green, of the Jersey Pine, Pinus virginiana, (Keeler, 1915).

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arrange along the branches in two-leaved sheathed bunches. Leaf - needle-shape, one and three fourths to two and three fourths inches long, stiff, bluntish; on the outer side smooth and rounded; on the inner side flat, and rough downwards. Cones - one and three fourths to three inches long, usually single and pointing downward. Scales - tipped with a stiff, straight prickle. Bark - of the trunk, rough and blackish. Young branches smooth (in other pines scaly). Twigs - purplish. Found - from Long Island along the coast to South Carolina, and through eastern and Middle Kentucky to Southeastern Indiana; in sandy and generally barren soil. General Information - An evergreen tree fifteen to forty feet high, irregular in shape and with straggling, spreading, or drooping branches. The timber is very "pitchy," soft, and durable, but poor even for fuel. "Next to the Gray Pine, the Jersey Pine is the most uninteresting species of the United States." - Michaux, f.

Genus Pinus, L. (Pine)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arrange along the branches…

Junipers are coniferous plants in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. Depending on taxonomic viewpoint, there are between 50-67 species of juniper, widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa in the Old World, and to the mountains of Central America. Junipers vary in size and shape from tall trees, 20-40 m tall, to columnar or low spreading shrubs with long trailing branches. They are evergreen with needle-like and/or scale-like leaves. They can be either monoecious or dioecious

Juniper

Junipers are coniferous plants in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. Depending…

An illustration of a juniper branch, vertical section of fruit (1), and male catkin (2). Junipers are coniferous plants in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. Depending on taxonomic viewpoint, there are between 50-67 species of juniper, widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa in the Old World, and to the mountains of Central America

Juniper

An illustration of a juniper branch, vertical section of fruit (1), and male catkin (2). Junipers are…

Genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. This juniper is found in barren soil form, in east Florida.

Juniper in Barren Soil Form

Genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. This juniper is found in barren soil form, in east…

Genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. This juniper is in pyramidal form, found in Potomac Valley, Washington, D.C.

Juniper in Pyramidal Form

Genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. This juniper is in pyramidal form, found in Potomac…

Gymnosporangium fuscum is a fungus that induces a thickened state of the branches of its host.

Juniper Twig Attacked by Gymnosporangium

Gymnosporangium fuscum is a fungus that induces a thickened state of the branches of its host.

Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Redcedar, Red Cedar, Eastern Juniper, Red Juniper, Pencil Cedar) is a species of juniper native to eastern North America, from southeastern Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, east of the Great Plains. Further west, it is replaced by the related Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain Juniper), and to the southwest, by Juniperus ashei (Ashe Juniper). The Lakota Native American name is Chansha, "redwood" or Hante'. In its native range, it is commonly called "cedar" or "red cedar", names rejected by the American Joint Committee on Horticultural Nomenclature as it is a juniper, not a true cedar

Eastern Juniper

Juniperus virginiana (Eastern Redcedar, Red Cedar, Eastern Juniper, Red Juniper, Pencil Cedar) is a…

A species of conifer found in The Bahamas, Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica.

Branch of Juniperus Barbadensis

A species of conifer found in The Bahamas, Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica.

A coniferous tree native to the northern districts of the North Island of New Zealand and is the bigest but not tallest species of tree in the country, with trunk diameters that rival Sequoias.

Kauri Pine

A coniferous tree native to the northern districts of the North Island of New Zealand and is the bigest…

Also known as Pinus attenuata. The pine cone of a Knobcone Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Knobcone Pine

Also known as Pinus attenuata. The pine cone of a Knobcone Pine tree.

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged along the branches in many-leaved bunches without sheaths. Leaf - thread-like, one to two inches long, withering and falling in the autumn. Bark - smooth. Cones - about one half inch long; broad egg-shaped; green or violet when young, becoming purple and brownish as they ripen. Scales - thin, nearly round, their edges entire. Found - from Pennsylvania, Northern Indiana, and Northern Illinois through the Northern States and far northward. It grows usually in low, swampy land, where it often thickly covers large areas. General Information - A tree fifty to one hundred feet high (not evergreen), with a straight trunk and slender, horizontal branches. The wood is durable, hard, and very strong, and is largely used in ship-building, for posts, railroad ties, etc. The Indians and Canadians were accustomed to use the fibres of the Larch roots for sewing their bark canoes; and for tightening the seams, the gum of the Balsam Fir. Give me of your roots, O Tamarak! Of your fibrous roots, O Larch-Tree! My canoe to bind together, So to bind the ends together, That the water may not enter, That the river ma not wet me! Give me of your balm, O Fir-Tree! Of your balsam and your resin, So to close the seams together That the water may not enter, That the river may not wet me! And the Fir-Tree tall and sombre, Sobbed through all its robes of darkness, Answered wailing, answered weeping. 'Take my balm, O Hiawatha!'"

Genus Larix, Tourn. (Larch)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness; arranged along the branches in…

The common name of libocedrus is incense cedar. The doniana variety has closely set branchlets. The tree grows between thirty and seventy feet tall.

Fruiting Branchlet of Libocedrus Doniana

The common name of libocedrus is incense cedar. The doniana variety has closely set branchlets. The…

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Loblolly pine (pinus toeda L.). Two-thirds natural size. detached cone scales dorsal view

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Loblolly pine (pinus toeda L.). Two-thirds natural size. detached cone scales ventral view

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Loblolly pine (pinus toeda L.). Two-thirds natural size. mature closed cone

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Loblolly pine (pinus toeda L.). Two-thirds natural size. mature open cone

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

This shows the cluster of three, slightly twisted leaves of the Loblolly Pine, Pinus taeda, (Keeler, 1915).

Loblolly Pine Needles

This shows the cluster of three, slightly twisted leaves of the Loblolly Pine, Pinus taeda, (Keeler,…

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Loblolly pine (pinus toeda L.). Two-thirds natural size. seed and wing

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Loblolly pine (pinus toeda L.). Two-thirds natural size. young cones

The loblolly pine, also known as slash-pine is a common pine tree in the Virginias and Carolinas.

Also known as Pinus taeda. The pine cone of a Southeastern United States pine tree.

Pine Cone of Loblolly Pine

Also known as Pinus taeda. The pine cone of a Southeastern United States pine tree.

Also known as Pinus contorta. The pine cone of a Lodgepole Pine tree, commonly found in western North America.

Pine Cone of Lodgepole Pine

Also known as Pinus contorta. The pine cone of a Lodgepole Pine tree, commonly found in western North…

The longleaf pine commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. The longleaf pine branch has a terminal bud.

Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Two-thirds natural size. Branch with terminal bud

The longleaf pine commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. The longleaf pine branch has…

The longleaf pine has a type of pine cone that is large, open and commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States.

Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Open cone, natural size.

The longleaf pine has a type of pine cone that is large, open and commonly found in the South Atlantic…

The longleaf pine commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. The leaves come 3 in a bundle, 9 to 12 inches long.

Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Two-thirds natural size. Leaf bundle.

The longleaf pine commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. The leaves come 3 in a bundle,…

The longleaf pine commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. The leaves are 9 to 12 inches long.

Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Two-thirds natural size. Primary leaf bracts (magnified)

The longleaf pine commonly found in the South Atlantic and Gulf States. The leaves are 9 to 12 inches…

Also known as Pinus palustris. The pine cone of a Longleaf Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Longleaf Pine

Also known as Pinus palustris. The pine cone of a Longleaf Pine tree.

Also known as Cupressus macrocarpa. A species of cypress that is endemic to the Central Coast of California.

Branch of Monterey Cypress

Also known as Cupressus macrocarpa. A species of cypress that is endemic to the Central Coast of California.

Also known as Pinus radiata. The pine cone of a Monterey Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Monterey Pine

Also known as Pinus radiata. The pine cone of a Monterey Pine tree.

Also known as Tsuga mertensiana. A species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America, between Alaska and Caiifornia.

Pine Cone of Mountain Hemlock

Also known as Tsuga mertensiana. A species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America, between…