143 illustrations of pine trees including: balsam fir, bishop pine, California torreya,, Caribbean pine, coulter pine, douglas fir, gray pine, incense cedar, Jersey pine, juniper, kauri pine, knobcone pine, lablolly pine, longleaf pine, pitch pine, scotch pine, scots pine, scots pine, sequoia, shasta red fir, shortleaf pine, spruce, stone pine, sugar pine, table mountain pine, Turkish pine, and white fir as well as pine cones, needles, and seedlings

An illustration of a silver fir cone and a small branch. Silver Fir or European Silver Fir (Abies alba) is a fir native to the mountains of Europe, from the Pyrenees north to Normandy, east to the Alps and the Carpathians, and south to southern Italy and northern Serbia, where it intergrades with the closely related Bulgarian Fir.

Silver Fir Cone and Foliage

An illustration of a silver fir cone and a small branch. Silver Fir or European Silver Fir (Abies alba)…

Also known as Albies alba.

Pine Cone of Silver Fir

Also known as Albies alba.

Also known as Pinus monophylla. The pine cone of a Single-leaf Pinyon.

Pine Cone of Single-Leaf Pinyon

Also known as Pinus monophylla. The pine cone of a Single-leaf Pinyon.

An illustration of the spruce fir's cone, and foliage.

Spruce Fir Cone and Foliage

An illustration of the spruce fir's cone, and foliage.

"Longitudinal section through fertilized ovule of a spruce. p, pollen grains; t, pollen tubes; n neck of the archegonium; a, body of archegonium with nucleus; e, embryo sac filled with endosperm." -Bergen, 1896

Spruce Ovule

"Longitudinal section through fertilized ovule of a spruce. p, pollen grains; t, pollen tubes; n neck…

Also known as Pinus glabra. The pine cone of a Spruce Pine tree.

Pine Cone of Spruce Pine

Also known as Pinus glabra. The pine cone of a Spruce Pine tree.

Stone pine and parasol pine are the common names of pinus pinea. The tree grows between fifty and sixty feet tall. This tree is native to the Mediterranean region.

Stone Pine

Stone pine and parasol pine are the common names of pinus pinea. The tree grows between fifty and sixty…

Also known as Pinus lamertiana. The pine cone of a sugar pine tree.

Pine Cone of Sugar Pine

Also known as Pinus lamertiana. The pine cone of a sugar pine tree.

Swiss stone pine is the common name of pinus cembra. The leaves are marked with silver lines and are slender and flexible. The tree grows between fifty and one hundred fifty feet tall.

Swiss Stone Pine

Swiss stone pine is the common name of pinus cembra. The leaves are marked with silver lines and are…

Table mountain pine is the common name of pinus pungens. The cones are rather large, top shaped, and light yellowish brown.

Table Mountain Pine

Table mountain pine is the common name of pinus pungens. The cones are rather large, top shaped, and…

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches in two-leaved sheathed bunches. Leaf - needle-shape, about two and one half inches long, stiff; outer side smooth and rounded; inner side hollowed. Cones - about three and one half inches long, of a light yellow color, stemless, often united in clusters of fours. Scales - with a stout spine, widening at its base, one sixth of an inch in length. Found - within narrower limits than any other American Pine; along the Alleghany Mountains from Pennsylvania to Tennessee, especially upon Table Mountain in North Carolina, one of the highest peaks of the range. General Information - A tree ten to fifty feet high, with light and soft wood, largely used for charcoal.

Genus Pinus, L. (Pine)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their closeness, but arranged along the branches…

Also known as Pinus contorta, var. murrayana. The pine cone of a Tamarack Pine tree, native to the Cascade Range, Sierra Nevada, and surrounding mountain ranges.

Pine Cone of Tamarack Pine

Also known as Pinus contorta, var. murrayana. The pine cone of a Tamarack Pine tree, native to the Cascade…

"The Tamarind is an evergreen tree, 80 feet high by 25 in circumference, cultivated in India as far N. as the Jhelum, and very largely planted in avenues and 'topes.' The wood, which is yellowish-white, sometimes with red streaks, is hard and close-grained. It weighs about 83 pounds per cubic foot, is highly prized, but is very difficult to work, and is used in India for turning wheels, mallets, planes, furniture, rice-pounders, oil and sugar mills, etc. The West Indian and South American variety has legumes only three times as long as the broad, whereas the Indian tree has them six times as long. The tamarinds sold in the United States are chiefly West Indian tamarinds. They differ from the Black or East Indian tamarinds, of which the preserved pulp is black."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Tamarind

"The Tamarind is an evergreen tree, 80 feet high by 25 in circumference, cultivated in India as far…

A tropical tree of the legume family, whose pods are used in the production of food and drinks.

Tamarind

A tropical tree of the legume family, whose pods are used in the production of food and drinks.

A tree which is rarely seen in Florida, bearing glossy leaves.

Torreya Taxifolia

A tree which is rarely seen in Florida, bearing glossy leaves.

Also known as Juniperus osteosperma. A small tree native to the southwestern United States.

Branch of Utah Juniper

Also known as Juniperus osteosperma. A small tree native to the southwestern United States.

Also known as Pinus virginiana.

Virginia Pine, Pine Cone

Also known as Pinus virginiana.

Also known as Tsuga heterophylla. A species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America.

Pine Cone of Western Hemlock

Also known as Tsuga heterophylla. A species of hemlock native to the west coast of North America.

Also known as Juniperus occidentalis. Native to the western United States.

Branch of Western Juniper

Also known as Juniperus occidentalis. Native to the western United States.

Also known as Thuja plicata. An evergreen coniferous tree native to western North America.

Branch of Western Redcedar

Also known as Thuja plicata. An evergreen coniferous tree native to western North America.

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their smallness and closeness. They are scale-like, somewhat egg-shape, overlapping each other, and closely pressed in four rows up and down the very flat branchlets. Each leaf has at its centre a raised gland, easily distinguished if held between the eye and the light. Bark - fibrous. The "spray" (formed from the flat branchlets) is itself flat and very delicate and of a dull green. Cones - about one fourth of an inch in diameter, round, variously placed, compact, purplish as they ripen; opening when ripe toward the centre line (i. e., not toward its base). Scales - fleshy, shield-shaped and apparently fastened near their centres, with the edge several-pointed, and with a sharp point or knob in the centre. Seeds - usually four to eight under each scale, oval, with wide wings at the sides. Found - in deep, cold swamps (filling them densely and exclusively), from Southern Maine along the coast to Florida, and along the Gulf coast to Mississippi. General Information - A tapering evergreen tree, thirty to seventy feet high, with light and durable wood, largely used in boat-building, for wooden-ware, shingles, etc.

Genus Chamaecyparis, Spach. (White Cedar)

Leaves - simple; indeterminate in position because of their smallness and closeness. They are scale-like,…

Also known as Abies concolor. Native to the mountains of western North America.

Pine Cone of White Fir

Also known as Abies concolor. Native to the mountains of western North America.

This shows the cluster of five leaves of the White Pine, Pinus strobus, (Keeler, 1915).

White Pine Needles

This shows the cluster of five leaves of the White Pine, Pinus strobus, (Keeler, 1915).