The Kings ClipArt gallery provides 190 portraits of various kings throughout history.

(1660-1727) King of Great Britain and Ireland 1714-1727

George I, King of England

(1660-1727) King of Great Britain and Ireland 1714-1727

King of the Hellenes, or Greece.

George I, King of England

King of the Hellenes, or Greece.

"George I." — Lardner, 1885

George I, King of England

"George I." — Lardner, 1885

The King of Great Britain and Ireland from August 1, 1714 until he died on June 11, 1727.

George I, King of England

The King of Great Britain and Ireland from August 1, 1714 until he died on June 11, 1727.

"George II." — Lardner, 1885

George II, King of England

"George II." — Lardner, 1885

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 - 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until his death. This is the usual appearance of George III.

Usual Appearance of George III. About 1776 (From a sketch by Gear.)

George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738 - 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain and King…

"King George III, king of England during the old Confederation."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

George III, King of England

"King George III, king of England during the old Confederation."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"George III (1760-1815). The first two Hanoverian kings were ignorant of English politics and obliged to rely on their ministers. Moreover, they cared more for Hanover than for England. But George II had English ideas. He was born and educated in England, and he made up his mind that he would rule in the manner of the old kings. He tried to restore the power of the crown at the expense of Parliament. In private morals and social relations he was better than his predecessors, and his character inspired respect. He had the loftiest ideas of royal dignity, and the greater part of his reign was taken up with the struggles with Parliament. But though he had some good qualities, he was narrow-minded, ill-educated, and imprudent. During the first twenty-four years of his reign he managed to estrange his people, check the prosperity of the nation, and lose forever the American colonies. His reign therefore was disastrous. The details of the struggle with the American colonies and the rise of the United States to the foremost rank among nations do not properly fall within the scope of this work. It is sufficient here to state that by the treaty of 1783 England's control over the thirteen colonies was lost forever. During the latter part of the reign of George III he was incapacitated for ruling. He was stricken with insanity, and the government passed into the hands of the prince regent, afterwards George IV. The most interesting side of the reign from the point of view of general history is the relations of England with foreign powers and the part where she played in the wars that arose from the French Revolution."—Colby, 1899

George III, King of England

"George III (1760-1815). The first two Hanoverian kings were ignorant of English politics and obliged…

"George III." — Lardner, 1885

George III, King of England

"George III." — Lardner, 1885

George IV (George Augustus Frederick; 12 August 1762 - 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death.

George IV

George IV (George Augustus Frederick; 12 August 1762 - 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom…

George IV or George Augustus Frederick (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. He had earlier served as The Prince Regent when his father, George III, suffered from a relapse into insanity from an illness that is now suspected to have been porphyria. The Regency, George's nine-year tenure as Prince Regent, which commenced in 1811 and ended with George III's death in 1820, was marked by victory in the Napoleonic Wars in Europe.

George IV

George IV or George Augustus Frederick (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United…

King of England 1820-1830

George IV, King of England

King of England 1820-1830

This illustration shows a glove from the time of Napoleon I.

Glove from the Time of Napoleon I

This illustration shows a glove from the time of Napoleon I.

This illustration shows the glove of Henry VI.

Glove of Henry VI

This illustration shows the glove of Henry VI.

Swedish king who fought to keep Sweden neutral during World War I.

Gustave V

Swedish king who fought to keep Sweden neutral during World War I.

(1872-1957) King of Norway from 1905-1957

Haakon VII

(1872-1957) King of Norway from 1905-1957

Norwegian king during World War I.

Haakon VII

Norwegian king during World War I.

"Henry I." — Lardner, 1885

Henry I

"Henry I." — Lardner, 1885

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror, the first King of England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. He succeeded his elder brother William II as King of England in 1100 and defeated his eldest brother, Robert Curthose, to become Duke of Normandy in 1106. He was called Beauclerc for his scholarly interests and Lion of Justice for refinements which he brought about in the rudimentary administrative and legislative machinery of the time. Henry's reign is noted for its political opportunism. His succession was confirmed while his brother Robert was away on the First Crusade and the beginning of his reign was occupied by wars with Robert for control of England and Normandy. He successfully reunited the two realms again after their separation on his father's death in 1087. Upon his succession he granted the baronage a Charter of Liberties, which formed a basis for subsequent challenges to rights of kings and presaged Magna Carta, which subjected the King to law.

Henry I of England

Henry I (c. 1068/1069 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William I the Conqueror, the first…

King of England

Henry II

King of England

Henry II, from his tomb

Henry II

Henry II, from his tomb

Henry II of England.

Henry II

Henry II of England.

Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189). Henry was the first of the House of Plantagenet to rule England and was the great-grandson of William the Conqueror. Like his grandfather, Henry I of England, Henry II had an outstanding knowledge of the law. A talented linguist and excellent Latin speaker, he would sit on councils in person whenever possible. His interest in the economy was reflected in his own frugal lifestyle. He dressed casually except when tradition dictated otherwise and ate a sparing diet.

Henry II

Henry II of England (5 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189). Henry…

King of England

Henry III

King of England

Henry III of England.

Henry III

Henry III of England.

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. Despite his long reign, his personal accomplishments were slim and he was a political and military failure. England, however, prospered during his century and his greatest monument is Westminster, which he made the seat of his government and where he expanded the abbey as a shrine to Edward the Confessor.

Henry III

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as…

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as King of England, reigning for fifty-six years from 1216 to his death. His contemporaries knew him as Henry of Winchester. He was the first child king in England since the reign of Ethelred the Unready. Despite his long reign, his personal accomplishments were slim and he was a political and military failure. England, however, prospered during his century and his greatest monument is Westminster, which he made the seat of his government and where he expanded the abbey as a shrine to Edward the Confessor.  He assumed the crown under the regency of the popular William Marshal, but the England he inherited had undergone several drastic changes in the reign of his father. He spent much of his reign fighting the barons over the Magna Carta and the royal rights, and was eventually forced to call the first "parliament" in 1264. He was also unsuccessful on the Continent, where he endeavored to re-establish English control over Normandy, Anjou, and Aquitaine.

Henry III of England

Henry III (1 October 1207 – 16 November 1272) was the son and successor of John "Lackland" as…

King of England

Henry IV

King of England

"By embracing the Catholic religion he made his way to the throne of France; and this monarch, Henry the Fourth, secured to his Protestant subjects, by the famous Edict of Nantes, in 1598, a full enjoyment of their civil rights and privileges, without persecution or molestation from any quarters." — Goodrich, 1844

Henry IV

"By embracing the Catholic religion he made his way to the throne of France; and this monarch, Henry…

Henry IV

Henry IV

Henry IV

(1553-1610) King of France.

Henry IV

(1553-1610) King of France.

Henry V.

Henry V

Henry V.

Henry V (16 September 1386 – 31 August 1422) was one of the most significant English warrior kings of the 15th century. He was born at Monmouth, Wales, in the tower above the gatehouse of Monmouth Castle, and reigned as King of England from 1413 to 1422. Henry was the son of Henry of Bolingbroke, later Henry IV, and sixteen-year-old Mary de Bohun, who was to die in childbirth at 26, before Bolingbroke became king. At the time of his birth during the reign of Richard II, Henry was fairly far removed from the throne, preceded by the king and another collateral line of heirs. The precise date and even year of his birth are therefore not definitely recorded; sources offer as the most likely either 9 August or 16 September, in 1386 or 1387. By the time Henry died, he had not only consolidated power as the King of England but had also effectively accomplished what generations of his ancestors had failed to achieve through decades of war: unification of the crowns of England and France in a single person. In 2002, he was ranked 72nd in the 100 Greatest Britons

Henry V of England

Henry V (16 September 1386 – 31 August 1422) was one of the most significant English warrior kings…

Henry VI

Henry VI

Henry VI

Henry was the only child and heir of King Henry V of England and therefore great things were expected of him from birth. He was born on 6 December 1421 at Windsor, and succeeded to the throne at the age of eight months on 31 August 1422, when his father died. His mother, Catherine of Valois, was then only 20 years old and as the daughter of King Charles VI of France was viewed with considerable suspicion and prevented from having a full role in her son's upbringing. Henry was eventually crowned King of England at Westminster Abbey on 6 November 1429 a month before his eighth birthday, and King of France at Notre Dame in Paris on 16 December 1431. However, he did not assume the reins of government until he was declared of age in 1437—the year in which his mother died.

Henry VI of England

Henry was the only child and heir of King Henry V of England and therefore great things were expected…

(1456-1509) King of England.

Henry VII

(1456-1509) King of England.

Portrait of Henry VII, English king.

Henry VII

Portrait of Henry VII, English king.

Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor (Welsh Harri Tudur), was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty.

Henry VII of England

Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485…

King of England

Henry VIII

King of England

"Henry VIII (1509-1547) came to the throne in 1509, inheriting a vast treasure which he owed to the avarice of his father. A young and active man, he was ambitious in the early part of his reign for military distinction and several times he took part in the wars on the continent. These wars gave England small glory and no practical advantage. The only brilliant military achievement of the reign was gained when Henry was abroad; this was the battle of Flodden Field in 1513, where the English defeated the Scotch army which was sent across the border to plunder the northern counties."—Colby, 1899

Henry VIII

"Henry VIII (1509-1547) came to the throne in 1509, inheriting a vast treasure which he owed to the…

An infante of the Kingdom of Portugal, and was responsible for the early development of European exploration and maritime trade with other continents.

Prince Henry

An infante of the Kingdom of Portugal, and was responsible for the early development of European exploration…

"Ivan IV, The Terrible." — Lardner, 1885

Ivan IV

"Ivan IV, The Terrible." — Lardner, 1885

King of Scotland

James I

King of Scotland

(1566-1625) King of England, also James VI of Scotland.

James I

(1566-1625) King of England, also James VI of Scotland.

King James I of England

King James I

King James I of England

King of England

James II

King of England

"James II." — Lardner, 1885

James II

"James II." — Lardner, 1885

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1685 until his death in 1701.

James II

The King of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1685 until his death in 1701.

James II of England and Ireland, James VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) was King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 6 February 1685. He was the last Catholic monarch to reign over the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The Parliament of England deemed James to have abdicated on 11 December 1688. The Parliament of Scotland on 11 April 1689 declared him to have forfeited the throne. He was replaced not by his Catholic son, James Francis Edward, but by Mary II and William III. William and Mary became joint rulers in 1689. Mary was the eldest daughter of James and a Protestant. William was both his nephew and son-in-law. James II made one serious attempt to recover his crowns, when he landed in Ireland in 1689.

James II of England

James II of England and Ireland, James VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) was…

He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary, Queen of Scots. Regents governed during his minority, which ended officially in 1578, though he did not gain full control of his government until 1581. On 24 March 1603, as James I, he succeeded the last Tudor monarch of England and Ireland, Elizabeth I, who died without issue. He then ruled England, Scotland and Ireland for 22 years, often using the title King of Great Britain, until his death at the age of 58.

James the First

He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother…

John of England.

John of England

John of England.

King of England

King John

King of England

The King of England from April 6, 1199, until his death, October 18, 1216.

King John

The King of England from April 6, 1199, until his death, October 18, 1216.

King John of France

King John of France

King John of France