The Famous People in Religion ClipArt gallery includes 76 portraits of theologians, clergy, and other religious leaders.

(1835-1922) American clergyman, theologian, editor, and author.

Lyman Abbott

(1835-1922) American clergyman, theologian, editor, and author.

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. During the latter's reign, Andrewes served as successively as Bishop of Chichester, Ely and Winchester; and oversaw the translation of the Authorized Version (or King James Version) of the Bible. In the Church of England he is commemorated on 25 September with a Lesser Festival.

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions…

(1813-1887) Protestant clergyman that raised and equipped a volunteer regiment for the Civil War.

Henry Ward Beecher

(1813-1887) Protestant clergyman that raised and equipped a volunteer regiment for the Civil War.

(1775-1863) Presbyterian minister and revivalist who called for constant church services and strong opposition to drinking.

Lyman Beecher

(1775-1863) Presbyterian minister and revivalist who called for constant church services and strong…

This is an engraved portrait of Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg, Germany. He was a cardinal priest of the Holy Roman Church. This portrait was created by German artist Albrecht Dürer.

Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg

This is an engraved portrait of Cardinal Albrecht of Brandenburg, Germany. He was a cardinal priest…

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. He is known, among other things, for his critique of Thomas Hobbes's egoism and John Locke's theory of personal identity. During his life and after his death, Butler influenced many philosophers, including David Hume, Thomas Reid, and Adam Smith. He is most famous for his Fifteen Sermons Preached at the Rolls Chapel (1726) and Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed (1736).

Bishop Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and…

An image of Augustus making a speech to his army under the tutelage of Julius Caesar.

Coin

An image of Augustus making a speech to his army under the tutelage of Julius Caesar.

A coin of Cyrene showing an image of Jupiter.

Coin of Cyrene

A coin of Cyrene showing an image of Jupiter.

An illustration of a coin depicting Saint Ignatius of Loyola. Saint Ignatius of Loyola (Spanish: Ignacio López de Loyola) (October 23, 1491 – July 31, 1556) was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus. The compiler of the Spiritual Exercises, Ignatius was described by Pope Benedict XVI as being above all a man of God, who gave the first place of his life to God, and a man of profound prayer.

Saint Ignatius of Loyola Coin

An illustration of a coin depicting Saint Ignatius of Loyola. Saint Ignatius of Loyola (Spanish: Ignacio…

Famous clergyman and abolitionist.

Robert Collyer

Famous clergyman and abolitionist.

(1839-1902) Catholic Archbishop of New York 1885

Archbishop Michael Corrigan

(1839-1902) Catholic Archbishop of New York 1885

A coin engraved with images of Minerva and Jupiter. Minerva was the Roman equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena, and Jupiter was similar to the Greek god of thunder, Zeus.

Dieties

A coin engraved with images of Minerva and Jupiter. Minerva was the Roman equivalent to the Greek goddess…

Morgan Dix (born November 1, 1827 in New York City; died April 29, 1908) was an American priest, "divine" (a theologian) and religious author. The son of John A. Dix and Catherine Morgan, he was educated at Columbia College and the General Theological Seminary. For almost fifty-three years, he was identified with Trinity Church, New York, of which he became assistant minister in 1855 and rector in 1862. As well as being a very active churchman, Dix also wrote widely about the practice of Christianity. Among his major works are Commentaries on Romans and on Galatians and Colossians; The Calling of a Christian Woman; The Seven Deadly Sins; The Sacramental System; and Lectures on the First Prayer-Book of Edward VI.

Morgan Dix

Morgan Dix (born November 1, 1827 in New York City; died April 29, 1908) was an American priest, "divine"…

Félix Antoine Philibert Dupanloup (January 3, 1802 – October 11, 1878) was a French ecclesiastic. In ecclesiastical policy his views were moderate. Both before and during the First Vatican Council, he opposed the definition of the dogma of papal infallibility as inopportune, but after the definition was among the first to accept the dogma. Dupanloup died on October 11, 1878, at the château of La Combe-de-Lancey.

Félix Antoine Philibert Dupanloup

Félix Antoine Philibert Dupanloup (January 3, 1802 – October 11, 1878) was a French ecclesiastic.…

Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was a colonial American Congregational preacher, theologian, and missionary to Native Americans.

Jonathan Edwards

Jonathan Edwards (October 5, 1703 – March 22, 1758) was a colonial American Congregational preacher,…

(1703-1758) American theologian and president of Princeton.

Jonathan Edwards

(1703-1758) American theologian and president of Princeton.

John Eliot (c. 1604 - 21 May 1690) was a Puritan missionary born in Widford, Hertfordshire, England.

John Eliot

John Eliot (c. 1604 - 21 May 1690) was a Puritan missionary born in Widford, Hertfordshire, England.

1831-1903) British Clergyman and writer who wrote Eric and Little by Little

Dean Frederick William Farrar

1831-1903) British Clergyman and writer who wrote Eric and Little by Little

(1829-1902) American Roman Catholic and first Archbishop of Chicago.

Archbishop Feehan

(1829-1902) American Roman Catholic and first Archbishop of Chicago.

A female depiction of Fortune with many iconic symbols, such as the rudder, the cornucopia, and ears of corn. The quiver she holds allies her to Diana, while the ornaments on her head suggest a relationship with Isis.

Fortune

A female depiction of Fortune with many iconic symbols, such as the rudder, the cornucopia, and ears…

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the posts of Bishop of London, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury. In 1570 Grindal became Archbishop of York, where Puritans were few and coercion would be required mainly for Roman Catholics. His first letter from Cawood to Cecil told that he had not been well received, that the gentry were not "well-affected to godly religion and among the common people many superstitious practices remained."

Archbishop Edmund Grindal

Edmund Grindal (c. 1519 – 6 July 1583) was an English church leader who successively held the…

(1822-1909) Minister who wrote The Man Without a Country to encourage patriotism during the Civil War.

Edward Everett Hale

(1822-1909) Minister who wrote The Man Without a Country to encourage patriotism during the Civil War.

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married Amelia Shipley, daughter of the Dean of St Asaph. He was made prebendary of St Asaph in 1812, appointed Bampton lecturer for 1815, preacher at Lincoln's Inn in 1822, and Bishop of Calcutta in January 1823. Before sailing for India he received the degree of D.D. from the University of Oxford. In India, Bishop Heber laboured indefatigably - not only for the good of his own diocese, but for the spread of Christianity throughout the East. He toured the country, consecrating churches, founding schools and discharging other Christian duties. Heber was a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy. His fame rests mainly on his hymns.

Bishop Reginald Heber

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married…

Thomas Wentworth Higginson (December 22, 1823 - May 9, 1911) was an American minister, author, abolitionist, and soldier.

Thomas Wentworth Higginson

Thomas Wentworth Higginson (December 22, 1823 - May 9, 1911) was an American minister, author, abolitionist,…

(1838-1919) Catholic Archbishop of St. Paul

Archbishop Ireland

(1838-1919) Catholic Archbishop of St. Paul

John Ireland (September 11, 1838 – September 25, 1918) was the third bishop and first archbishop of Saint Paul, Minnesota.

Archbishop John Ireland

John Ireland (September 11, 1838 – September 25, 1918) was the third bishop and first archbishop of…

"Now the chief priests and the whole council sought witness against Jesus to put him to death; and found it not. For many bare false witness against him, and their witness agreed not together. And there stood up certain, and bare false witness against him, saying, We heard him say, I will destroy this temple that is made with hands, and in three days I will build another made without hands. And not even so did their witness agree together." Mark 14:55-59 ASV
<p>Jesus, flanked by soldiers, stands before the council. The chief priests and others are arranged behind a draped table.

Jesus before the Council

"Now the chief priests and the whole council sought witness against Jesus to put him to death; and found…

Portrait of Jesus looking upward with right hand raised in blessing is an engraving by Lazarus Gottlieb Sichling from an original painting in the possession of a Bible publisher (Baumgärtners Buchhandlung) in Leipzig, Germany.

Portrait of Jesus Christ

Portrait of Jesus looking upward with right hand raised in blessing is an engraving by Lazarus Gottlieb…

"And Pilate, wishing to content the multitude, released unto them Barabbas, and delivered Jesus, when he had scourged him, to be crucified." Mark 15:15
<p>Illustration of Jesus bound to a post and scourged by three men prior to his crucifixion.

Jesus Scourged before Crucifixion

"And Pilate, wishing to content the multitude, released unto them Barabbas, and delivered Jesus, when…

This image of Joan of Arc is from the painting by Nikolaki.

Joan of Arc

This image of Joan of Arc is from the painting by Nikolaki.

The tomb of John Bunyan, one of the most famous religious writers of any age. (1628-1688)

John Bunyan

The tomb of John Bunyan, one of the most famous religious writers of any age. (1628-1688)

"And in those days cometh John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, saying, Repent ye; for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. For this is he that was spoken of through Isaiah the prophet, saying, The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make ye ready the way of the Lord, Make his paths straight. Now John himself had his raiment of camel's hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and his food was locusts and wild honey." Matthew 3:1-4 ASV
<p>Illustration of John the Baptist wearing a camel hair garnet and holding a cup. A cross can barely be seen in the shadow at the left side of the illustration.

John the Baptist

"And in those days cometh John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, saying, Repent ye;…

(1899-1981) Preacher and writer that wrote Studies in the Sermon on the Mount.

Reverend David Jones

(1899-1981) Preacher and writer that wrote Studies in the Sermon on the Mount.

The oldest pope and had the third longest pontificate.

Leo XIII

The oldest pope and had the third longest pontificate.

(1810-1903) Cardinal

Leo XIII

(1810-1903) Cardinal

Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 - February 18, 1546) was a German monk, theologian, university professor, Father of Protestantism, and church reformer whose ideas influenced the Protestant Reformation and changed the course of Western civilization. Luther's theology challenged the authority of the papacy by holding that the Bible is the only infallible source of religious authority and that all baptized Christians under Jesus are a universal priesthood. According to Luther, salvation is a free gift of God, received only by true repentance and faith in Jesus as the Messiah, a faith given by God and unmediated by the church.

Martin Luther

Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 - February 18, 1546) was a German monk, theologian, university professor,…

John Cardinal McCloskey, (March 10, 1810 - October 10, 1885) was an American cardinal, the fifth bishop (second archbishop) of the Roman Catholic diocese of New York.

Cardinal McCloskey

John Cardinal McCloskey, (March 10, 1810 - October 10, 1885) was an American cardinal, the fifth bishop…

(1810-1885) Cardinal of the Catholic Church

Cardinal McCloskey

(1810-1885) Cardinal of the Catholic Church

A medal of Antioch engraved with an image of Nemesis, the goddess of divine punishment.

Medal of Antioch

A medal of Antioch engraved with an image of Nemesis, the goddess of divine punishment.

A Medal of Caesarea Libanus. On one side the head of Alexander Severus is engraved. Depicted on the other is the tall figure of the goddess Astarte, the emperor placing a crown on her head.

Medal of Caesarea Libanus

A Medal of Caesarea Libanus. On one side the head of Alexander Severus is engraved. Depicted on the…

A medal with a figure of a diety.

Medal With a Diety

A medal with a figure of a diety.

This is an engraved portrait of Philip Melanchthon who was a German Professor and Theologian. He was an important figure in the Protestant Reformation. This portrait was created by German artist Albrecht D&uuml;rer in 1526.

Philip Melanchthon

This is an engraved portrait of Philip Melanchthon who was a German Professor and Theologian. He was…

An American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon School in Massachusetts, the Moody Bible Institute and Moody Press.

Dwight Moody

An American evangelist and publisher who founded the Moody Church, Northfield School and Mount Hermon…

An American clergyman and social reformer, born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Although scholarly and reserved, he preached two sermons in 1892 in which he attacked the political corruption of New York City government. Backed by the evidence he collected, his statements led to both the exposure of Tammany Hall and to subsequent social and political reforms.

Charles Parkhurst

An American clergyman and social reformer, born in Framingham, Massachusetts. Although scholarly and…

(1843-1932) American clergyman and educator

Francis Patton, LL.D.

(1843-1932) American clergyman and educator

A drawing of Pope Pius IX. He was the pope from June 16, 1846 until February 7, 1878. Pope Pius IX is known as the longest reigning pope in church history.

Pope Pius IX Sitting

A drawing of Pope Pius IX. He was the pope from June 16, 1846 until February 7, 1878. Pope Pius IX is…

The second longest-reigning elected Pope in Church history, serving from 1846 until his death in 1878. He defined the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary.

Pope Pius IX

The second longest-reigning elected Pope in Church history, serving from 1846 until his death in 1878.…

(1835- ) Pope of the Catholic Church

Pius X

(1835- ) Pope of the Catholic Church

Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 &ndash; June 14, 1864) was a Confederate general who was once a planter in Maury County, Tennessee, and a second cousin of President James K. Polk.

Leonidas Polk

Leonidas Polk (April 10, 1806 – June 14, 1864) was a Confederate general who was once a planter…

From a Painting by Raphael, in the Pitti Palace, Florence.

Pope Julies II

From a Painting by Raphael, in the Pitti Palace, Florence.

Blessed Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 &ndash; February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, was Pope from June 16, 1846, until 1878. His was the longest reign in Church History lasting almost 32 years. During his pontificate, he convened the First Vatican Council in 1869, which decreed Papal infallibility. The Pope defined the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, meaning that Mary was conceived without original sin.

Pope Pius IX

Blessed Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, was…

Pope Sixtus V (December 13, 1521 &ndash; August 27, 1590), born Felice Peretti di Montalto, was Pope from 1585 to 1590. The subsequent administrative system of the Church owed much to Sixtus V. He limited the College of Cardinals to seventy; and doubled the number of the congregations, and enlarged their functions, assigning to them the principal role in the transaction of business (1588). He regarded the Jesuits with disfavour and suspicion. He meditated radical changes in their constitution, but death prevented the execution of his purpose. In 1589 was begun a revision of the Vulgate, the so-called Editio Sixtina.

Pope Sixtus V

Pope Sixtus V (December 13, 1521 – August 27, 1590), born Felice Peretti di Montalto, was Pope…

an English chemist, philosopher, dissenting clergyman, and educator. He is known for his investigations of carbon dioxide and the co-discovery of oxygen.

Joseph Priestley

an English chemist, philosopher, dissenting clergyman, and educator. He is known for his investigations…

"An English philosopher and divine, was born in 1733 near Leeds." -Marshall

Joseph Priestly

"An English philosopher and divine, was born in 1733 near Leeds." -Marshall

Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642), was a French clergyman, noble, and statesman. Consecrated as a bishop in 1607, he later entered politics, becoming a Secretary of State in 1616. Richelieu soon rose in both the Church and the state, becoming a cardinal in 1622, and King Louis XIII's chief minister in 1624. He remained in office until his death in 1642; he was succeeded by Jules Cardinal Mazarin.

Richelieu

Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642),…

Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (9 September 1585 &ndash; 4 December 1642), was a French clergyman, noble, and statesman. Consecrated as a bishop in 1608, he later entered politics, becoming a Secretary of State in 1616. Richelieu soon rose in both the Church and the state, becoming a cardinal in 1622, and King Louis XIII's chief minister in 1624. He remained in office until his death in 1642; he was succeeded by Jules Cardinal Mazarin.

Cardinal Richelieu

Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (9 September 1585 – 4 December…

A coin with a female figure of Ceres, holding ears of corn and the torch of Minerva.

Roman Coin

A coin with a female figure of Ceres, holding ears of corn and the torch of Minerva.

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became Dean of St. Paul's in 1664, greatly assisting with the rebuilding after the Great Fire of London, towards which he contributed £1400. In 1677, being now prolocutor of the Convocation, he was unexpectedly advanced to the archbishopric of Canterbury. He attended Charles II upon his deathbed, and "made to him a very weighty exhortation, in which he used a good degree of freedom." He crowned King James II in 1685.

Archbishop William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became…

An Italian Dominican priest of Florence, Italy. He is best known for his acts of book burning.

Savonarola

An Italian Dominican priest of Florence, Italy. He is best known for his acts of book burning.

A French Roman Catholic clergyman who helped transform the Estates-General into the National Assembly.

Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès

A French Roman Catholic clergyman who helped transform the Estates-General into the National Assembly.