The Italy Miscellaneous ClipArt gallery offers 49 illustrations of everyday life in Italy, historic costume, places, building details, landscapes, cityscapes, documents, and other illustrations related to Italy and the Holy See.

The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural ancestral region of Angeln, a modern district located in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Ancient Angeln preceded all modern national distinctions and was, therefore, probably not coterminous with the modern culture of the same region.

The Angli in Rome

The Angles is a modern English word for a Germanic-speaking people who took their name from the cultural…

This painting by Harry Quilter, the author of the book, is of the city of Assisi in Italy

Assisi

This painting by Harry Quilter, the author of the book, is of the city of Assisi in Italy

Assisi is a town in Italy in province of Perugia, Italy, in the Umbria region, on the western flank of Mt. Subasio. It is the birthplace of St. Francis, who founded the Franciscan religious order in the town in 1208, and St. Clare, the founder of the Poor Clares. Saint Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows of the 19th century was also born in Assisi.

City of Assisi

Assisi is a town in Italy in province of Perugia, Italy, in the Umbria region, on the western flank…

An illustration of a Byzantine capital from the central portal of St. Mark's Venice. In several traditions of architecture including Classical architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, 'head') forms the crowning member of a column or a pilaster. The capital projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the form of the latter (normally square) with the circular shaft of the column.

Byzantine Capitals

An illustration of a Byzantine capital from the central portal of St. Mark's Venice. In several traditions…

An illustration of a Byzantine capital from the the Church of St. Vitale, Ravenna. In several traditions of architecture including Classical architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, 'head') forms the crowning member of a column or a pilaster. The capital projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the form of the latter (normally square) with the circular shaft of the column.

Byzantine Capitals

An illustration of a Byzantine capital from the the Church of St. Vitale, Ravenna. In several traditions…

An illustration of a Byzantine capital from the the Church of St. Vitale, Ravenna. In several traditions of architecture including Classical architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, 'head') forms the crowning member of a column or a pilaster. The capital projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the form of the latter (normally square) with the circular shaft of the column.

Byzantine Capitals

An illustration of a Byzantine capital from the the Church of St. Vitale, Ravenna. In several traditions…

"A sewer, a drain. Rome was intersected by numerous sewers, some of which were of an immense size: the most celebrated of them was the cloaca maxima, the construction of which is ascribed to Tarquinius Priscus. It was formed by three tiers of arces, one within the other, the innermost of which is a semicircular vault of 14 feet in diameter. The manner of its construction is shown in the annexed cut. Under the republic, the administration of the sewers was entrusted to the censors; but under the empire, particular officers were appointed for that purpose, called cloacarum curatores, who employed condemned criminals in cleansing and repairing them." — Smith, 1873

Cloaca

"A sewer, a drain. Rome was intersected by numerous sewers, some of which were of an immense size: the…

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra and other gates at Perugia; so also in the Cloacæ at Rome, of which the Cloaca Maxima is 20 feet broad. These are sewers which were intended to render the marshy district between the hills of Rome inhabitable. They were constructed in the reign of Tarquinius Superbus, at the beginning of the sixth century B.C.

The Cloaca Maxima at Rome

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra…

Ruins of the Coliseum in Rome.

Coliseum

Ruins of the Coliseum in Rome.

"Monstrance of Copper Gilt; Italian work of the 15th century." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1903

Copper Gilt

"Monstrance of Copper Gilt; Italian work of the 15th century." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1903

This jug has a handle which is sculpted higher than the jug itself. A woman's face is seen near the jug's opening. Floral patterns decorate the outer portion of the jug. The base is smaller than the main portion.

Etruscan Jug

This jug has a handle which is sculpted higher than the jug itself. A woman's face is seen near the…

Roman States Flag

Roman States Flag

Roman States Flag

Tuscany Flag

Tuscany Flag

Tuscany Flag

Two Sicilies Flag

Two Sicilies Flag

Two Sicilies Flag

A picture of Florence, the capital of the former duchy of Tuscany, located in Italy.

Florence

A picture of Florence, the capital of the former duchy of Tuscany, located in Italy.

A fountain in Rome, Italy.

Fountain

A fountain in Rome, Italy.

Iron belt-chain used in the Gallic War.

Gallic Iron Belt-chain

Iron belt-chain used in the Gallic War.

Garibaldi's might makes right - nothing succeeds like success.

Garibaldi's Might and Success

Garibaldi's might makes right - nothing succeeds like success.

"House construction consists mainly of concrete or brick, and sometimes of stone blocks, especially at the corners. Two-storied, sometimes three-storied houses are numerous, though the upper floors, built of wood, have been consumed by the eruption. Stores usually occupied the ground floors of dwelling-houses, on their street aspect, let out to merchants or dealers as at the present day, but not connected with the back part of the house. They could be separated from the street by large wooden doors, while inside they had tables covered with marble, in which earthen vessels for wine or oil were inserted. The storekeeper had sometimes a second room at the back, when he did not live on an upper floor or in another part of the town."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Pompeiian House

"House construction consists mainly of concrete or brick, and sometimes of stone blocks, especially…

Impost cap from St. Vitale. The impost cap (or impost-block) was interposed between the capital and the spring of the vaulting.

Impost Cap

Impost cap from St. Vitale. The impost cap (or impost-block) was interposed between the capital and…

Basket cap from St. Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna. When an impost cap has extensive lacey or basket-like carving it is known as a "basket" cap.

Impost Cap

Basket cap from St. Apollinare Nuovo, Ravenna. When an impost cap has extensive lacey or basket-like…

The Coat of Arms of Italy.

Italian Coat of Arms

The Coat of Arms of Italy.

Black and white outline flag of Italy. Three equal vertical bands of green (hoist side), white, and red; similar to the flag of Ireland, which is longer and is green (hoist side), white, and orange; also similar to the flag of the Cote d'Ivoire, which has the colors reversed - orange (hoist side), white, and green; inspired by the French flag brought to Italy by Napoleon in 1797

Flag of Italy, 2009

Black and white outline flag of Italy. Three equal vertical bands of green (hoist side), white, and…

Color flag of Italy. Three equal vertical bands of green (hoist side), white, and red; similar to the flag of Ireland, which is longer and is green (hoist side), white, and orange; also similar to the flag of the Cote d'Ivoire, which has the colors reversed - orange (hoist side), white, and green; inspired by the French flag brought to Italy by Napoleon in 1797.

Flag of Italy, 2009

Color flag of Italy. Three equal vertical bands of green (hoist side), white, and red; similar to the…

Flag of Italy, 1881

Italy, flag

Flag of Italy, 1881

Italy, flag, 1910

Italy, flag, 1910

Italy, flag, 1910

"The main essentials in all the Roccoco Styles are a certain independence in the ornamentation of the main architectural organism, the prominence of this ornamentation itself, and finally its shape and design. A luxurious elegance is displayed in the treatment of interiors, which was most happily employed in the embellishment of the state apartments. [This image] gives an example of the absence of connection among the various ornaments employed in the system of decoration, such as was especially peculiar to the churches of the Jesuits."

Jesuit Churh, Rome

"The main essentials in all the Roccoco Styles are a certain independence in the ornamentation of the…

View of Mt. Stromboli from the northwest.

Mt. Stromboli

View of Mt. Stromboli from the northwest.

Bay of Naples with Vesuvius in distance

Bay of Naples

Bay of Naples with Vesuvius in distance

This painting is from a drawing by the author of Padua in Italy.

Padua

This painting is from a drawing by the author of Padua in Italy.

"The bodies of those who perished were buried under layers of fine pumice stones and ashes. When plaster of Paris was poured into the cavity left by a decaying body, the result was a complete cast of a victim of the eruption."—Webster, 1913

Cast of a Body Found at Pompeii

"The bodies of those who perished were buried under layers of fine pumice stones and ashes. When plaster…

Illustrations of various surgical instruments used in Pompeii, Italy.

Surgical Instruments from Pompeii

Illustrations of various surgical instruments used in Pompeii, Italy.

This illustration shows a house built in the ancient city of Pompeii.

Pompeiian House

This illustration shows a house built in the ancient city of Pompeii.

One of the curbs or heads of the cisterns which are filled with water from the neighboring mainland.

Pozzo

One of the curbs or heads of the cisterns which are filled with water from the neighboring mainland.

"The decoration of the interiors of the buildings of the Renaissance is also copied from ancient Roman architecture. The rooms are either vaulted or have flat ceilings, but in both cases are adorned with paintings after the manner of those discovered in the Baths of Titus, as is shown in [this image], or by panel-work, that is, sunken coffers with a regularly distributed enrichment. These panels are themselves often adorned with historical or allegorical paintings, or with arabesques. Ornamented panels were employed in large palaces for horizontal ceilings, as also in churches, though in the latter case they were more often applied to cupola vaulting, as notable in St. Peter's."

Painted Vault of the Florentine Palace in Rome

"The decoration of the interiors of the buildings of the Renaissance is also copied from ancient Roman…

Rome is the capital city of Italy and Lazio, and is Italy's largest and most populous city, with more than 2.7 million residents, and a metropolitan area of almost 4 million inhabitants. It is located in the central-western portion of the Italian peninsula, on the Tiber river. Rome stands on top of more than two and a half thousand years of history, was once the largest city in the world and the center of Western civilization. Rome is still the heart of Christianity, being seat of the Roman Catholic Church which controls the Vatican City as its sovereign territory, an enclave of Rome.

General View of Rome

Rome is the capital city of Italy and Lazio, and is Italy's largest and most populous city, with more…

The artist is unknown for this drawing. The picture is of the room in which Turner was found months after his death by his maid.

The Room in which Turner Died

The artist is unknown for this drawing. The picture is of the room in which Turner was found months…

"A small covered brazier of glazed earthenware, used in Italy." -Whitney, 1911

Scaldino

"A small covered brazier of glazed earthenware, used in Italy." -Whitney, 1911

Coat of Arms, Italy

The Great Seal of Italy

Coat of Arms, Italy

Coat of Arms, Modena

The Great Seal of Modena

Coat of Arms, Modena

Coat of Arms, Parma

The Great Seal of Parma

Coat of Arms, Parma

Coat of Arms, Roman States

The Great Seal of the Roman States

Coat of Arms, Roman States

Coat of Arms, Tuscany

The Great Seal of Tuscany

Coat of Arms, Tuscany

Coat of Arms, Two Sicilies

The Great Seal of Two Sicilies

Coat of Arms, Two Sicilies

The state barge of Venice, which was used in the ceremony of "Wedding the Adriatic."—Myers, 1905

State Barge of Venice

The state barge of Venice, which was used in the ceremony of "Wedding the Adriatic."—Myers, 1905

Vesuvius as seen from Naples with the lava streams of 1872 in dark.

Vesuvius

Vesuvius as seen from Naples with the lava streams of 1872 in dark.

A portrait of the Bay of Naples and Mount Vesuvius.

Bay of Naples and Vesuvius

A portrait of the Bay of Naples and Mount Vesuvius.

An eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

Mount Vesuvius

An eruption of Mount Vesuvius.

"Portrait from a statue discovered in the ruins of the Temple of Vesta in the Roman Forum."—Webster, 1913

A Vestal Virgin

"Portrait from a statue discovered in the ruins of the Temple of Vesta in the Roman Forum."—Webster,…