The Events in United Kingdom History ClipArt gallery offers 43 illustrations of famous events such as the death of Thomas a Becket, the Great Fire of London, and the signing of the Magna Carta.

Alfred hid in the Somersetshire marsh country and was thought to be a poor individual. The herdsman's wife often told Alfred to turn the cakes on the fire.

Alfred In The Herdsman's Hut

Alfred hid in the Somersetshire marsh country and was thought to be a poor individual. The herdsman's…

The Siege of Alicant, Spain in 1709. Caption bellow illustration: "The mine at last blew up; the rock opened and shut; the whole mountain felt convulsion, the governor and field officers, with their company, ten guns, and two mortars, were buried in the Abyss."

The Siege of Alicant

The Siege of Alicant, Spain in 1709. Caption bellow illustration: "The mine at last blew up; the rock…

"Ethelbert met Augustine in the open air, under a tree at Canterbury, and heard him tell about the true God and Jesus Christ, whom He has sent; and, after some time, and a great deal of teaching, Ethelbert gave up worshiping Wooden and Thor, and believed in the true God and was baptized, and many of his people with him."

Augustine and Ethelbert

"Ethelbert met Augustine in the open air, under a tree at Canterbury, and heard him tell about the true…

The Battle of Agincourt was an English victory against a larger French army in the Hundred Years' War. The battle occurred on Friday 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day), in northern France. Henry V's victory started a new period in the war, in which he came very close to capturing the throne of France for himself and his heirs.

Battle of Azincourt

The Battle of Agincourt was an English victory against a larger French army in the Hundred Years' War.…

"Death of Becket. During the early years of the reign Thomas A. Becket, as the king's chancellor, had shown great zeal in his cause, but, being appointed archbishop of Canterbury in 1162, he devoted himself wholly to the interests of the church and the exaltation of his office, and became the most dangerous of the king's foes. the main point at issue between them was the trial of members of the clergy who had been guilty of crime. The civil courts had lost all authority over clerical offenders, who were tried by the church tribunals. But the latter bodies could inflict only spiritual penalties, and serious offenses often went without adequate punishment. In the Constitutions of Clarendon (1164) it was decided that ecclasiastics accused of crime must first be summoned before the king's justices, who were to determine whether the offense came within the jurisdiction of a secular or a spiritual court. Becket reluctantly agreed to this, as well as to other provisions seriously affecting the authority of the church, but soon afterwards sent to the pope and asked forgiveness for what he had done. The king's party was powerful, and Becket took refuge in France, but a few years later, through the aid of the pope and French king, was reinstated. On his return to England he angered the king by excommunicating the bishops who had taken sides against him. Henry, in a moment of rage, spoke some hasty words, which were construed by his attendants as a wish for the murder of Becket. They broke into the cathedral where the latter had taken refuge and killed him at the altar (December, 1170). Becket was now regarded as a martyr and a patron saint, and the king was finally obliged to make his submission to the papal representative and declar on oath his innocence of all complicity in the murder. Thus the apparent outcome of the struggle was unfavorable to the king, but in reality Henry gained the main object for which he had been working. The church courts no longer enjoyed such complete authority over criminal members of the clergy."—Colby, 1899

Death of Becket

"Death of Becket. During the early years of the reign Thomas A. Becket, as the king's chancellor, had…

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas A. Becket, did not think it was right to consent to a law that said if a priest or monk was thought to have committed any crime, he should be tried by a king's judge, instead of the bishop, and though he and the king had once been great friends, King Henry II was so angry with him that he was forced to leave England, and take shelter with the King of France.

Thomas A-Becket

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas A. Becket, did not think it was right to consent to a law that…

Martyrdom of St. Thomas at Canterbury Cathedral.

Martyrdom of St. Thomas

Martyrdom of St. Thomas at Canterbury Cathedral.

"Among the Danish kings of England, Canute stands preeminent for his wisdom and military prowess. His father, Sweyn, king of Denmark, after a most successful campaign against the Saxons, entered London in triumph, and England was completely conquered." — Goodrich, 1844

Canute and followers

"Among the Danish kings of England, Canute stands preeminent for his wisdom and military prowess. His…

Canute the Great, Danish king of England, Denmark and Norway

Canute by the Sea-Shore

Canute the Great, Danish king of England, Denmark and Norway

When Henry VIII became king in 1509, Wolsey's affairs prospered. He became Canon of Windsor, Berkshire in 1511, the same year in which he became a member of the Privy Council. His political star was in the ascendant, and he soon became the controlling figure in all matters of state. 1514, he was made Bishop of Lincoln, and then Archbishop of York.

Cardinal Wolsey Served by Noblemen

When Henry VIII became king in 1509, Wolsey's affairs prospered. He became Canon of Windsor, Berkshire…

This illustration shows the trial of King Charles I. He was put on trial after a civil war, which lead to his beheading.

Charles I Trial

This illustration shows the trial of King Charles I. He was put on trial after a civil war, which lead…

The King's trial (on charges of high treason and "other high crimes") began on January 2, but Charles refused to enter a plea, claiming that no court had jurisdiction over a monarch. He believed that his own authority to rule had been given to him by God when he was crowned and anointed, and that the power wielded by those trying him was simply that which grew out of a barrel of gunpowder. The court, by contrast, proposed that no man is above the law.

Death of Charles I

The King's trial (on charges of high treason and "other high crimes") began on January 2, but Charles…

"That prince escaped from the battle of Worcester as soon as he saw that the day was lost. With a small company of attendants, he eluded the pursuit of the enemy's cavalry by the fleetness of his horse, and struck off from the high road without well knowning which way to go." — Goodrich, 1844

Escape of Charles II

"That prince escaped from the battle of Worcester as soon as he saw that the day was lost. With a small…

"The viciously inclined considered that the parliamentary order to destroy all 'monuments of idolatry' gave them liberty and license for every kind of sacrilege; so that it became a common pastime to break the painted windows and deface any statuary which adorned and beautified [England's] churches. The old market crosses which had been a notable feature of English tows, reminding the passers by of the great act of Redemption, were all ruthlessly destroyed."

Destruction of Cheapside Cross

"The viciously inclined considered that the parliamentary order to destroy all 'monuments of idolatry'…

Queen Elizabeth stepping over some mud with Sir Walter Raleigh's cloak.

Sir Walter Raleigh's Cloak

Queen Elizabeth stepping over some mud with Sir Walter Raleigh's cloak.

In 1189, Colchester was granted its first Royal Charter by King Richard I (Richard the Lionheart.) In 1648, during the Second English Civil War, a Royalist army led by Sir Charles Lucas and Sir George Lisle entered the town. A pursuing Parliamentary army led by Sir Thomas Fairfax and Henry Ireton surrounded the town for eleven and a half weeks, a period known as the Siege of Colchester. The Royalists surrendered in the late summer and their leaders Lucas and Lisle were executed in the grounds of Colchester Castle. A small obelisk marks the spot where they fell.

Fairfax Taking Possession of Cochester

In 1189, Colchester was granted its first Royal Charter by King Richard I (Richard the Lionheart.) In…

Oliver Cromwell dismissing the Long Parliament.

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell dismissing the Long Parliament.

This illustration shows a group of Crusaders gathering for a battle.

Crusaders

This illustration shows a group of Crusaders gathering for a battle.

Wat Tyler, while talking to the King, grew violent, forgot to whom he was speaking, and laid his hand on the king's bridle, as if to threaten or take him prisoner. Upon this, the Lord Mayor, with his mace-dealt the man such a blow that he fell from his horse, and an attendant thrust him through with a sword.

Death of Wat Tyler

Wat Tyler, while talking to the King, grew violent, forgot to whom he was speaking, and laid his hand…

The death of William Rufus, the third son of William the Conqueror and King of England from 1087 until 1100. William Rufus died while hunting in New Forest when he was shot with an arrow through his heart.

Death of William Rufus

The death of William Rufus, the third son of William the Conqueror and King of England from 1087 until…

Edward II repulsed from Stirling castle by De Mowdray.

Edward II repulsed from Stirling castle by De Mowdray.

Edward II repulsed from Stirling castle by De Mowdray.

King Edward II was sent to prison for neglecting his Queen and fooling around with other men.

Edward II. And His Jailers

King Edward II was sent to prison for neglecting his Queen and fooling around with other men.

The position of England and France on the Suez Canal.

England and France at Suez Canal

The position of England and France on the Suez Canal.

When Charles was beheaded on January 30, 1649, Phillip Henry records that a moan was heard from the assembled crowd, some of whom then dipped their handkerchiefs in his blood, thus starting the cult of the Martyr King.

Execution of King Charles

When Charles was beheaded on January 30, 1649, Phillip Henry records that a moan was heard from the…

"Vault beneath the House of Lords associated with the Gunpowder Plot." -Foster, 1921

Gunpowder Plot

"Vault beneath the House of Lords associated with the Gunpowder Plot." -Foster, 1921

"One of the most extraordinary events in the history of England is that commonly known by the name of the gunpowder Treason and plot; in which case the king and parliament of England had a narrow escape, by a singular accident, from a diabolical scheme of destruction. This plot was the work of a small number of fanatical Roman Catholics, who undertook to wreak their revenge on James the First and his government for not showing indulgence to their religion." — Goodrich, 1844

Guy Fawkes and his associates

"One of the most extraordinary events in the history of England is that commonly known by the name of…

Death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066.

Battle of Hastings

Death of Harold at the Battle of Hastings, 1066.

Henry III is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. He was also the first child monarch in English royal history.

Henry III of Winchester

Henry III is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. He…

Henry VIII was married six times during his life. First, to Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymor, Anne of Cleves, Catherine Howard, and Catherine Parr.

Henry the VIII and His Wives

Henry VIII was married six times during his life. First, to Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymor,…

Henry VII and Francis I meeting on the field of the cloth of gold

Henry VII and Francis I

Henry VII and Francis I meeting on the field of the cloth of gold

Henry VIII and all of his men coming into the city

Henry VIII

Henry VIII and all of his men coming into the city

Henry VIII embarking at Dover, May 31, 1520

Henry VIII embarking at Dover

Henry VIII embarking at Dover, May 31, 1520

Henry VIII in Council, an engraving print from Chronicles of England by Raphael Holinshed in 1577.

Henry VIII in Council

Henry VIII in Council, an engraving print from Chronicles of England by Raphael Holinshed in 1577.

Native Americans negotiating with the English in Kensington Palace.

Kensington Palace

Native Americans negotiating with the English in Kensington Palace.

In the year 869, the Danes who had wintered at York, marched through Mercia into East Anglia and took up their quarters at Thetford. Edmund engaged them fiercely in battle, but the Danes had the victory, killed King Edmund, and remained in possession of the battlefield. They tied Edmund to an oak tree and shot at him with arrows, but nothing would shake his fortitude.

Murder of King Edmund

In the year 869, the Danes who had wintered at York, marched through Mercia into East Anglia and took…

King Henry was a builder of beautiful churches. Westminster Abby, as it is now, was one. And he was charitable to the poor that, when he had his children weighed, he gave their weight in gold and silver in alms. But he gave to everyone who asked, and so always wanted money; and sometimes his men could get nothing for the king and queen to eat, but by going and taking sheep and poultry from the poor farmers around; so that things were nearly as bad as under William Rufus-because the king was so foolishly good-natured. The Pope was always sending for money, too; and the king tried to raise it in ways that, according to Magna Carta, he had sworn not to do. His foreign friends told him that if he minded Magna Carta he would be a poor creature-not like a king who might do all he pleased; and whenever he listened to them he broke the laws of Magna Carta. Then, when his barons complained and frightened him, he swore again to keep them; so that nobody could trust him, and his weakness was almost as bad for the kingdom as John's wickedness. When they could bear it no longer, the barons all met him at the council, which was called the Parliament, from a French word meaning talk. This time they came in armor, binging all their fighting men, and declared that he had broken his word so often that they should appoint some of their own number to watch him, and hinder his doing anything against the laws he had sworn to observe, or from getting money from the people without their consent.

King Henry and his Barons

King Henry was a builder of beautiful churches. Westminster Abby, as it is now, was one. And he was…

The Great Fire of London, a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of London from Sunday, 2 September to Wednesday, 5 September 1666, was one of the major events in the history of England. The fire gutted the medieval City of London inside the old Roman City Wall. It threatened, but did not reach, the aristocratic district of Westminster (the modern West End), Charles II's Palace of Whitehall, and most of the suburban slums. It consumed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St. Paul's Cathedral, and most of the buildings of the City authorities. It is estimated that it destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the City's ca. 80,000 inhabitants.

Great Fire of London

The Great Fire of London, a major conflagration that swept through the central parts of London from…

"A general joy spread through the kingdom on the publication of the Great Charter." — Goodrich, 1844

King John signing the Magna Carta

"A general joy spread through the kingdom on the publication of the Great Charter." — Goodrich,…

As a kind of joke, John, King Henry's youngest son, had been called Lackland, because he had nothing when his brothers each had some great dukedom. The name suited him only too well before the end of his life. The English made him king at once. Richard had never had any children, but his brother Geoffery, who was older than John had left a son named Arthur, who was about twelve years old, and who rightly the Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou. King Philip, who was always glad to vex whoever was king of England, took Arthur under his protection, and promised to get Normandy out of John's hands. However, John had a meeting with him and persuaded him to desert Arthur, and marry his son Louis to John's own niece, Blanche, who had a chance of being queen of part of Spain. Still Arthur lived at the French King's court, and when he was sixteen years old, Philip helped him to raise an army and go to try his fortune against his uncle. He laid siege to Mirabeau, a town where his grandmother, Queen Eleanor, was living. John, who was then in Normandy, hurried to her rescue, beat Arthur's army, made him prisoner and carried him off, first to Romen, and then to the strong castle of Falaise. Nobody quite knows what was done to him there. The governor, Hubert de Burgh, once found him fighting hard, though with no weapon but a stool, to defend himself from some ruffians who had been sent to put out his eyes. Hubert saved him from these men, but shortly after this good man was sent elsewhere by the king, and John came himself to Falaise. Arthur was never seen alive again, and it is believed that John took him out in a boat in the river at night, stabbed him with his own hand, and threw his body in the river.

Murder of Prince Arthur

As a kind of joke, John, King Henry's youngest son, had been called Lackland, because he had nothing…

Wat Tyler's Rebellion was the leader of the Revolt know as the English Peasant Revolt of 1381.

Wat Tyler's Rebellion

Wat Tyler's Rebellion was the leader of the Revolt know as the English Peasant Revolt of 1381.

During one of King Richard the Lion-Heart's crusades the city of Acre was taken over and a prince, Leopold, Duke of Austria, set up his banner on the walls. Richard did not think it ought to be there: he pulled it up and threw it down into the ditch, asking the duke how he durst take the honors of a king.

Richard Removing the Archduke's Banner

During one of King Richard the Lion-Heart's crusades the city of Acre was taken over and a prince, Leopold,…

Stephen, who was a kind-hearted man himself, tried to stop these cruelties; but then the barons turned round on him, told him he was not their proper king, and invited Maude to come and be crowned in his stead.

Stephen

Stephen, who was a kind-hearted man himself, tried to stop these cruelties; but then the barons turned…

When William was denied the throne of Normandy he assembled a Norman invasion fleet of around 600 ships and 7000 soldiers.

William the Conqueror

When William was denied the throne of Normandy he assembled a Norman invasion fleet of around 600 ships…