The Washington's Birthday ClipArt gallery includes 75 illustrations of George Washington and events in his life. Washington's Birthday is a federal holiday observed in the United states the third Monday in February. The holiday is officially designated as "Washington's Birthday" although state and local governments may use other names.

Washington and the ice of the Alleghany

Alleghany

Washington and the ice of the Alleghany

The home in which General Washington used for his headquarters on the eve of the Battle of Brandywine. He and his generals held a council of war and planned their strategy.

Washington's Headquarters at Brandywine

The home in which General Washington used for his headquarters on the eve of the Battle of Brandywine.…

Washington taking command of the army at Cambridge.

Cambridge

Washington taking command of the army at Cambridge.

Washington in the French War at Fort Necessity

Fort Necessity

Washington in the French War at Fort Necessity

The installation of Washington.

Installation

The installation of Washington.

Lafayette and Washington meeting during the American Revolution.

Lafayette and Washington

Lafayette and Washington meeting during the American Revolution.

The Washington Monument

Monument

The Washington Monument

Mount Vernon, the home and burial place of George Washington, situated in Fairfax county, Virginia, on the Potomac River, about fifteen miles below Washington. Several thousand acres of land were included in the original estate.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, the home and burial place of George Washington, situated in Fairfax county, Virginia,…

Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington.

The servant's quarters of George Washington's Mount Vernon plantation in Virginia.

Mount Vernon

The servant's quarters of George Washington's Mount Vernon plantation in Virginia.

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mount Vernon in Washington's Day

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the…

The interior of a room of General Washington's headquarters in Newburgh, New York.

Interior of Washington's Headquarters at Newburgh

The interior of a room of General Washington's headquarters in Newburgh, New York.

Molly Pitcher salutes Washington during the Battle of Monmouth.

Molly Pitcher

Molly Pitcher salutes Washington during the Battle of Monmouth.

"Washington's visit to Colonel Rall. This is a copy, by permission, of a picture by Flagg, in the possession of Joseph C. Potts, Esq., of Trenton. On the left is seen Generals Washington and Greene; in the center is Mrs. Potts, and near her stands her husband. On the left Colonel Rall reclines upon a couch, and behind him, supporting his pillow, is his servant. I was informed that the portrait of Rall was painted from a description given by a person who knew him, and who pronounced the likeness good, as he remembered him."—Lossing, 1851

Colonel Rall

"Washington's visit to Colonel Rall. This is a copy, by permission, of a picture by Flagg, in the possession…

Woman who masqueraded as a male soldier presenting a letter to General Washington.

Deborah Simpson Presenting the Letter to General Washington

Woman who masqueraded as a male soldier presenting a letter to General Washington.

Reception of Washington at Trenton

Trenton

Reception of Washington at Trenton

A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, in theory built to celebrate a victory in war, actually used to celebrate a ruler. This specific Triumphal Arch was erected near Philadelphia for the reception of General Washington, April 20, 1789.

Triumphal Arch for the Reception of General Washington

A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, in theory built to celebrate a…

The headquarters in Valley Forge of General George Washington during the American Revolution.

Washington's Headquarters at Valley Forge

The headquarters in Valley Forge of General George Washington during the American Revolution.

George Washington.

Washington

George Washington.

George Washington warning General Braddock in his tent.

Washington and Braddock

George Washington warning General Braddock in his tent.

The Battle of Monmouth was an American Revolutionary War battle fought on June 28, 1778 in New Jersey. Here, George Washington is rebuking General Lee at the Battle of Monmouth.

Washington and General Lee

The Battle of Monmouth was an American Revolutionary War battle fought on June 28, 1778 in New Jersey.…

An illustration of George Washington in horseback commanding the American army. He is lining up the army and getting them ready for battle.

George Washington and American Troops

An illustration of George Washington in horseback commanding the American army. He is lining up the…

"Arms of the Washington family."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Arms

"Arms of the Washington family."—Lossing, 1851

The crest of the Washington Arms.

Washington Arms

The crest of the Washington Arms.

The coat of arms of George Washington, President of the United States of America from 1789 to 1797, were first used to identify the family in the twelfth century, when one of George Washington's ancestors took possession of Washington Old Hall, then in County Durham, in north-east England.

Washington Arms

The coat of arms of George Washington, President of the United States of America from 1789 to 1797,…

An illustration of George Washington lighting a cannon at the siege of Yorktown.

George Washington at Siege of Yorktown

An illustration of George Washington lighting a cannon at the siege of Yorktown.

The Washington family coat of arms. It is possible that this design had an influence on the creation of the American flag.

Washington Coat of Arms

The Washington family coat of arms. It is possible that this design had an influence on the creation…

A George Washington coin above a naval battle.

Washington Coin

A George Washington coin above a naval battle.

An illustration of George Washington crossing the Delaware River on December 25, 1776. This event occurred during the American Revolutionary War and was the first move in a surprise attack by the Continental Army against Hessian forces in New Jersey.

George Washington Crossing the Delaware

An illustration of George Washington crossing the Delaware River on December 25, 1776. This event occurred…

The first move in a surprise attack against the Hessian forces at the Battle of Trenton.

Washington Crossing the Delaware

The first move in a surprise attack against the Hessian forces at the Battle of Trenton.

The Coat of Arms of George Washington's family. It is said to be in inspiration of the stars and stripes on the flag of the United States.

Washington Family Coat of Arms

The Coat of Arms of George Washington's family. It is said to be in inspiration of the stars and stripes…

Ferry Farm, also known as George Washington Boyhood Home Site or Ferry Farm Site, is the name of the farm and home at which George Washington spent much of his childhood. In July 2008, archeologists announced that they had found remains of the boyhood home, which had burnt in a fire, including artifacts such as pieces of a tea set probably belonging to George's mother, Mary Ball Washington.

Washington Family Residence

Ferry Farm, also known as George Washington Boyhood Home Site or Ferry Farm Site, is the name of the…

The coat of arms of George Washington, President of the United States of America from 1789 to 1797, were first used to identify the family in the twelfth century, when one of George Washington's ancestors took possession of Washington Old Hall, then in County Durham, in north-east England.

Combined Arms of the Washington Family

The coat of arms of George Washington, President of the United States of America from 1789 to 1797,…

An illustration of George Washington directing the artillery at the Battle of Trenton in New Jersey. This battle took place on December 26, 1776 during the American Revolutionary War.

George Washington in Trenton

An illustration of George Washington directing the artillery at the Battle of Trenton in New Jersey.…

An illustration of George Washington and his army marching to Trenton, New Jersey, where the Battle of Trenton took place.

George Washington Marching to Trenton

An illustration of George Washington and his army marching to Trenton, New Jersey, where the Battle…

The Washington Medal above Mount Vernon.

Washington Medal

The Washington Medal above Mount Vernon.

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the back: Quod Parva Militum Manu Strenue Prospectus Hostes. Virtutis Ingenitæ Specionen Dedid In Pregna Ad Cowpens, 17th January, 1781- 'Because, having vigorously pursued the foe with a small band of soldiers, he gave a brilliant specimen of innate valor in the battle at the Cowpens, seventeenth January, 1781.' This inscription is within a laurel wreath."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Medal Back

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the back: Quod…

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the front: An officer mounted at the head of a body of cavalry, charging flying troops; Victory is flying over the heads of the Americans, holding a laurel crown in her right hand and a palm branch in her left. Legend: Gulielmo. Washington Legionis Equit. Præfecto Comitia Americana- The American Congress to William Washington commander of a regiment of cavalry."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Medal Front

"Silver medal awarded to Washington. The following are the device and inscriptions on the front: An…

"Washington Monument. The following are the inscriptions on the monument: East front: 'To George Washington, by the State of Maryland. Born 23d February, 1732. Died 14th December, 1799.' South front: 'To George Washington, President of the United States, 4th March, 1789. Returned to Mount Vernon, 4th March, 1797.' West front: To George Washington. Trenton, 25th December, 1776. Yorktown, 19th October, 1781.' North Front: 'To George Washington. Commander-in-chief of the American armies, 15th June, 1775. Commission resigned at Annapolis, 23d December, 1783.'"—Lossing, 1851

Washington Monument

"Washington Monument. The following are the inscriptions on the monument: East front: 'To George Washington,…

"Washington resigning his commission."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Resigning

"Washington resigning his commission."—Lossing, 1851

An illustration of George Washington as Commander in Chief of the American army. He is riding a horse along with other members of the American army.

George Washington Riding with the American Army

An illustration of George Washington as Commander in Chief of the American army. He is riding a horse…

The Seal of the State of Washington, 1889. The seal contains a portrait of George Washington and the 1889, when Washington state was admitted to the Union.

Seal of Washington

The Seal of the State of Washington, 1889. The seal contains a portrait of George Washington and the…

"Greenough's statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Statue

"Greenough's statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

"Statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Statue

"Statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

"Site of Washington's birth place."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Birth Place

"Site of Washington's birth place."—Lossing, 1851

The table at which President George Washington sat to eat his breakfast.

George Washington's Breakfast Table

The table at which President George Washington sat to eat his breakfast.

Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. Each medal honors a particular individual, institution, or event. The medal was first awarded in 1776 by the Second Continental Congress to then-General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War.

Washington's Congressional Gold Medal, Back

Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national…

Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national appreciation for distinguished achievements and contributions. Each medal honors a particular individual, institution, or event. The medal was first awarded in 1776 by the Second Continental Congress to then-General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War.

Washington's Congressional Gold Medal, Front

Since the American Revolution, Congress has commissioned gold medals as its highest expression of national…

General Washington's farewell to his officers.

Washington's Farewell

General Washington's farewell to his officers.

Washington's grave, Mount Vernon.

Washington's Grave

Washington's grave, Mount Vernon.

"Washington's head-quarters. This view is from the Reading rail-road, looking east, and includes a portion of the range of hills in the rear whereon the Americans were encamped. The main building was erected in 1770; the wing is more modern, and occupies the place of the log addition mentioned by Mrs. Washington, in a letter to Mercy Warren, written in March, 1778: 'The general's apartment,' she wrote, 'is very small; he has had a log cabin built to dine in, which has made our quarters much more tolerable than they were at first.'"—Lossing, 1851

Washington's head-quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. This view is from the Reading rail-road, looking east, and includes a portion…

"Washington's head-quarters. I was informed by the venerable Anna van Antwerp, about a fortnight before her death, in the autumn of 1851, that Washington made his head-quarters, on first entering the city, at the spacious house (half of which is yet standing at 180 Pearl Street, opposite Cedar Street), delineated in the engraving. The large window, with no arch, toward the right, indicates the center of the original building. It is of brick, stuccoed, and roofed with tiles. There Washington remained until sommoned to visit Congress at Philadelphia, toward the last of May. On his return, he went to the Kennedy House, No. 1 Broadway, where he remained until the evacuation in September."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Head-Quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. I was informed by the venerable Anna van Antwerp, about a fortnight before…

"Washington's head-quarters. The house occupied by Washington while the army was at White Plains is yet standing. It is a frame building, on the east side of the road, about two miles above the village. This view is from the road, looking northeast. When I last visited it (1851), Miss Jemima Miller, a maiden ninety-three yeras of age, and her sister, a few years her junior, were living therein, the home of their childhood. A chair and table, used by the chief, is carefully preserved by the family, and a register for the names of the numerous visitors is kept. This house was in the deep solitude of the forests, among the hills, when Washington was there; now the heights and the plain near by smile with cultivation."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Head-Quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. The house occupied by Washington while the army was at White Plains is…

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

Washington's Headquarters at Newburg

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

The headquarters of Washington at Tappan, New York.

Washington's Headquarters at Tappan

The headquarters of Washington at Tappan, New York.

Ferry Farm, also known as George Washington Boyhood Home Site or Ferry Farm Site, is the name of the farm and home at which George Washington spent much of his childhood. In July 2008, archeologists announced that they had found remains of the boyhood home, which had burnt in a fire, including artifacts such as pieces of a tea set probably belonging to George's mother, Mary Ball Washington.

Washington's House in Fredericksburg

Ferry Farm, also known as George Washington Boyhood Home Site or Ferry Farm Site, is the name of the…

In 1788, he built a magnificent home on Broadway, which in 1790 was leased to become the president's home, occupied by George Washington after the president's previous residence on Pearl proved too small.

George Washington's House on Broadway, New York (1790)

In 1788, he built a magnificent home on Broadway, which in 1790 was leased to become the president's…

In 1789, George Washington lived on Cherry Street, in a four-story mansion that belonged to Walter Franklin, a wealthy merchant. This house served as the first Executive Mansion of the President of the United States.

George Washington's House on Cherry Street, New York (1789)

In 1789, George Washington lived on Cherry Street, in a four-story mansion that belonged to Walter Franklin,…

An illustration of a young George Washington trekking through the wilderness.

Washington's Journey

An illustration of a young George Washington trekking through the wilderness.