The Vestments ClipArt gallery offers 50 illustrations of Christian liturgical garments. Although technically not vestments, the gallery also includes examples of non-liturgical clerical clothing and religious habits.

"The long white linen vestment worn in early times by all ecclesiastics at divine service. It differed from the more modern surplice, which is only a modification of it, in having narrower sleeves. At the foot and wrists were embroidered ornaments called apparels." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Albe

"The long white linen vestment worn in early times by all ecclesiastics at divine service. It differed…

An amice was a loose fitting garment worn by Romans over their tunics; it was also worn by priests and pilgrims.  It is a form of vestment used today by Roman Catholic priests during mass.

Amice

An amice was a loose fitting garment worn by Romans over their tunics; it was also worn by priests and…

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions in the Church of England during the reigns of Queen Elizabeth I and King James I. During the latter's reign, Andrewes served as successively as Bishop of Chichester, Ely and Winchester; and oversaw the translation of the Authorized Version (or King James Version) of the Bible. In the Church of England he is commemorated on 25 September with a Lesser Festival.

Bishop Lancelot Andrewes

Lancelot Andrewes (1555 – 25 September 1626) was an English clergyman and scholar, who held high positions…

A religous leader in Armenia.

Armenian Bishop

A religous leader in Armenia.

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas A. Becket, did not think it was right to consent to a law that said if a priest or monk was thought to have committed any crime, he should be tried by a king's judge, instead of the bishop, and though he and the king had once been great friends, King Henry II was so angry with him that he was forced to leave England, and take shelter with the King of France.

Thomas A-Becket

The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas A. Becket, did not think it was right to consent to a law that…

Within Roman Catholicism, a monk is a member of a religious order who lives a communal life in a monastery, abbey, or priory under a monastic rule of life (such as the Rule of St. Benedict) and under the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. St. Benedict of Nursia is considered to be the founder of western monasticism. He established the first monastic community in the west and authored the Rule of St. Benedict, which is the foundation for the Order of St. Benedict and all of its reforms such as the Cistercians and the Trappists.

Benedictine Monk

Within Roman Catholicism, a monk is a member of a religious order who lives a communal life in a monastery,…

Benedictine refers to the spirituality and consecrated life in accordance with the Rule of St Benedict, written by Benedict of Nursia in the sixth century.

Benedictine Nun

Benedictine refers to the spirituality and consecrated life in accordance with the Rule of St Benedict,…

He soon recovered himself and talked familiarly with the bishops.

Bishop

He soon recovered himself and talked familiarly with the bishops.

The pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical vestments worn by bishops in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Catholic, Anglican, and some Lutheran churches, in addition to the usual priestly vestments for the celebration of the Mass and the other sacraments.

Costume of a Bishop (12th Century)

The pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical…

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. He is known, among other things, for his critique of Thomas Hobbes's egoism and John Locke's theory of personal identity. During his life and after his death, Butler influenced many philosophers, including David Hume, Thomas Reid, and Adam Smith. He is most famous for his Fifteen Sermons Preached at the Rolls Chapel (1726) and Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed (1736).

Bishop Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler (May 18, 1692 O.S. – June 16, 1752) was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and…

The Monk from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Monk

The Monk from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Second Nun from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Second Nun

The Second Nun from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Friar from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Friar

The Friar from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Prioress from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

The Prioress

The Prioress from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Illustrated by Agnus MacDonall.

Order of friars, characterized by their dark brown robes and white hooded cloaks.

Carmelite

Order of friars, characterized by their dark brown robes and white hooded cloaks.

A Carthusian monk, known for their extreme asceticism.

Carthusian

A Carthusian monk, known for their extreme asceticism.

The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of St. Bruno, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed monastics. The order was founded by Saint Bruno of Cologne in 1084 and includes both monks and nuns. The order has its own Rule, called the Statutes, rather than the Rule of St Benedict (as is often erroneously reported) and combines eremitical and cenobitic life.

A Carthusian

The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of St. Bruno, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed…

Two priests wearing the garmet.

Chasuble

Two priests wearing the garmet.

The principle vestment worn by clergy of the Greek and Roman churches during celebration of mass.

Chasuble

The principle vestment worn by clergy of the Greek and Roman churches during celebration of mass.

The Order of Cistercians, sometimes called the White Monks, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed monks. The first Cistercian abbey was founded by Robert of Molesme in 1098, at Cîteaux Abbey near Dijon, France. Two others, Saint Alberic of Citeaux and Saint Stephen Harding, are considered co-founders of the order, and Bernard of Clairvaux is associated with the fast spread of the order during the 12th century.

Cistercian Monk

The Order of Cistercians, sometimes called the White Monks, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed…

A Cistercian, clad in white robe.

Cistercians

A Cistercian, clad in white robe.

"An ecclesiastical vestment, worn during the celebration of mass, at processions, vespers, and other soleminities. The cope was originally a cloak worn for ordinary purposes. In form it is a semicircle, without sleeves and with a hood." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Cope

"An ecclesiastical vestment, worn during the celebration of mass, at processions, vespers, and other…

A side robe of homely or course clothe.

Cope

A side robe of homely or course clothe.

An illustration of a seventeenth century coronation cope at Westminster Abbey. The cope (Known in Latin as pluviale 'rain coat' or cappa 'cape') is a liturgical vestment, which may conveniently be described as a very long mantle or cloak, open in front and fastened at the breast with a band or clasp. It may be of any liturgical color.

Coronation Cope

An illustration of a seventeenth century coronation cope at Westminster Abbey. The cope (Known in Latin…

"The deacon's robe, in the Roman Catholic Church. the most ancient form of the dalmatic is exhibited in the annexed wood-cut, after an early Christian painting on the walls of catacombs at Rmb. It was originally of linen, but it is now generally made of the same heavy silk as the Planeta, worn by the priest." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Dalmatic

"The deacon's robe, in the Roman Catholic Church. the most ancient form of the dalmatic is exhibited…

A sculpture representing and commemorating a person, usually in a church.

Effigy

A sculpture representing and commemorating a person, usually in a church.

"A Frate della Misericordia. MISERICORDIA, the name of a society (of laymen) in Florence, founded in the 13th century, who tend the poor sick, carry victims of accident or disease to the hospitals, and the dead to their burial. Members of all classes of the community, including the highest, are enrolled in this charitable association; and their somber and forbidding costume-- a dark monastic dress, with the cowl pulled down over the face so that the eyes merely peep through little holes." -Hazeltine, 1894

Frate della Misericordia

"A Frate della Misericordia. MISERICORDIA, the name of a society (of laymen) in Florence, founded in…

Friar Roger Bacon and the servant Miles with the brazen head from the play, The Honourable History of Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay by Robert Greene.

Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

Friar Roger Bacon and the servant Miles with the brazen head from the play, The Honourable History of…

The traditional mitre of Bishop Goodryke.

Mitre of Bishop Goodryke

The traditional mitre of Bishop Goodryke.

The traditional mitre of Archbishop Harnsett.

Mitre of Archbishop Harnsett

The traditional mitre of Archbishop Harnsett.

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married Amelia Shipley, daughter of the Dean of St Asaph. He was made prebendary of St Asaph in 1812, appointed Bampton lecturer for 1815, preacher at Lincoln's Inn in 1822, and Bishop of Calcutta in January 1823. Before sailing for India he received the degree of D.D. from the University of Oxford. In India, Bishop Heber laboured indefatigably - not only for the good of his own diocese, but for the spread of Christianity throughout the East. He toured the country, consecrating churches, founding schools and discharging other Christian duties. Heber was a pious man of profound learning, literary taste and great practical energy. His fame rests mainly on his hymns.

Bishop Reginald Heber

Having taken holy orders in 1807, he took up the family living of Hodnet in Shropshire. In 1809 he married…

The Bishop of Sherwood.

Proud Bishop of Hereford

The Bishop of Sherwood.

"Investiture of a bishop by a king through the giving of the crosier, or pastoral staff."—Myers, 1905

Investiture

"Investiture of a bishop by a king through the giving of the crosier, or pastoral staff."—Myers, 1905

John Jewel (May 24, 1522 – September 23, 1571), was an English bishop of Salisbury. Under Elizabeth's succession he returned to England, and made earnest efforts to secure what would now be called a low-church settlement of religion; he was strongly committed to the Elizabethan reforms. Indeed, his attitude was hardly distinguishable from that of the Elizabethan Puritans, but he gradually modified it under the stress of office and responsibility.

Bishop John Jewel

John Jewel (May 24, 1522 – September 23, 1571), was an English bishop of Salisbury. Under Elizabeth's…

Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 - February 18, 1546) was a German monk, theologian, university professor, Father of Protestantism, and church reformer whose ideas influenced the Protestant Reformation and changed the course of Western civilization. Luther's theology challenged the authority of the papacy by holding that the Bible is the only infallible source of religious authority and that all baptized Christians under Jesus are a universal priesthood. According to Luther, salvation is a free gift of God, received only by true repentance and faith in Jesus as the Messiah, a faith given by God and unmediated by the church.

Martin Luther

Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 - February 18, 1546) was a German monk, theologian, university professor,…

"Miter, or Mitre, is a form of head-dress worn by the inhabitants of Asia Minor; a head-band. In religion, the head-dress of a bishop. The episcopal miter was doubtless suggested by that of the Jewish high priest."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Miter

"Miter, or Mitre, is a form of head-dress worn by the inhabitants of Asia Minor; a head-band. In religion,…

"MITRE. A sacerdotal ornament for the head, worn by Roman Catholic archbishops and bishops on solemn occasions. " -Hall, 1862

Mitre

"MITRE. A sacerdotal ornament for the head, worn by Roman Catholic archbishops and bishops on solemn…

"Mitre. A sacerdotal ornament for the head, worn by Roman Catholic archbishops and bishops on solemn occasions." -Hall, 1862

Mitre

"Mitre. A sacerdotal ornament for the head, worn by Roman Catholic archbishops and bishops on solemn…

An example of a modern archbishop's mitre.

An Archbishop's Mitre

An example of a modern archbishop's mitre.

"In the Armenian Church priests and archdeacons, as well as the bishops, wear a mitre. That of the bishops is of the the Latin form, a custom dating from a grant of Pope Innocent II; that of the priests, the sagvahart is not unlike the Greek mitre." —Encyclopaedia Britannica

Mitre of Armenian Priest

"In the Armenian Church priests and archdeacons, as well as the bishops, wear a mitre. That of the bishops…

"The monks also became copyists, and with great painstaking and industry gathered and multiplied ancient manuscripts, and thus preserved and transmitted to the modern world much classical learning and literature that would otherwise have been lost."—Myers, 1905

Monk Copyist

"The monks also became copyists, and with great painstaking and industry gathered and multiplied ancient…

Odo of Bayeux (c. 1036 – February 1097, Palermo), Norman bishop and English earl, was the half-brother of William the Conqueror, and was for a time second only to the king in power in England.

Odo of Bayeux

Odo of Bayeux (c. 1036 – February 1097, Palermo), Norman bishop and English earl, was the half-brother…

An illustration of a Spanish priest.

Spanish Priest

An illustration of a Spanish priest.

Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642), was a French clergyman, noble, and statesman. Consecrated as a bishop in 1607, he later entered politics, becoming a Secretary of State in 1616. Richelieu soon rose in both the Church and the state, becoming a cardinal in 1622, and King Louis XIII's chief minister in 1624. He remained in office until his death in 1642; he was succeeded by Jules Cardinal Mazarin.

Richelieu

Armand Jean du Plessis de Richelieu, Cardinal-Duc de Richelieu (September 9, 1585 – December 4, 1642),…

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became Dean of St. Paul's in 1664, greatly assisting with the rebuilding after the Great Fire of London, towards which he contributed £1400. In 1677, being now prolocutor of the Convocation, he was unexpectedly advanced to the archbishopric of Canterbury. He attended Charles II upon his deathbed, and "made to him a very weighty exhortation, in which he used a good degree of freedom." He crowned King James II in 1685.

Archbishop William Sancroft

William Sancroft (30 January 1617 – 24 November 1693), was the 79th archbishop of Canterbury. He became…

Josip Juraj Strossmayer (February 4, 1815 – May 8, 1905) was a Roman Catholic bishop, benefactor and a politician from Croatia. Josip Juraj Strossmayer died at the age of 90. The university of the city of Osijek is named after him, and a large statue of Strossmayer is located in the park that the Academy building overlooks. The city of Dakovo built in memorial museum in 1991.

Josip Juraj Strossmayer

Josip Juraj Strossmayer (February 4, 1815 – May 8, 1905) was a Roman Catholic bishop, benefactor and…

Friar Tuck was a priest from old English folk tales.

Friar Tuck

Friar Tuck was a priest from old English folk tales.

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted for his hospitality, he was somewhat ostentatious in his habits, sometimes visiting Canterbury and other towns attended by a retinue of 800 horsemen. Whitgift's theological views were often controversial.

Archbishop John Whitgift

John Whitgift (c. 1530 – February 29, 1604) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1583 to his death. Noted…

William of Wykeham (1320 – 27 September 1404) was Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder of Winchester College and of New College, Oxford, and builder of a large part of Windsor Castle.

William of Wykeham

William of Wykeham (1320 – 27 September 1404) was Bishop of Winchester, Chancellor of England, founder…

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697 and 1755. When he came to the Isle of Man, he found the buildings of the diocese in a ruinous condition. The building of new churches was one of his first acts, and he eventually rebuilt most of the churches of the diocese along with establishing public libraries. Wilson worked to restore ecclesiastical discipline on the island, although he clashed with civil authorities partly because of the reduction of revenue from Wilson mitigating fines in the spiritual court.

Bishop Thomas Wilson

Thomas Wilson (20 December 1663 – 7 March 1755) was Anglican Bishop of Sodor and Man between 1697…