The 1861-1865 Civil War Camp Life ClipArt gallery offers 32 illustrations of typical camp life and training for a soldier in the American Civil War.

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is of Runyon's aid-de-camp, Captain James B. mulligan, of Elizabeth, N. J." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Aid-de-camp

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- loading."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Artillery practice

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- loading."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- officer giving the word of command to fire."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Artillery practice

"Artillery practice with the Dahlgren Howitzer boat gun- officer giving the word of command to fire."—…

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana Zouaves in their bivouac at Cumberland, Maryland. Great interest was attached to this regiment after its brilliant attack at Romney; and as we have presented them in the midst of the action, we have pleasure in showing them to our readers roughing it in their distant camps. The members of this regiment were magnificent specimens of the physical man, and under the Colonel Wallace and his officers, who marched on foot, leading their men, accomplished feats of endurance and daring that had been considered impossible in warfare.

Bivouac of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana…

"Scene in camp near Falmouth, Va. Army blacksmith shoeing a refractory mule."— Frank Leslie, 1896

blacksmith

"Scene in camp near Falmouth, Va. Army blacksmith shoeing a refractory mule."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Butchering and dressing cattle for distribution to the Federal Army. The romance and reality of life were never so strikingly displayed as in the Civil War. Fact and fiction never seemed more apart than the soldier waving his sword when leading the forlorn hope and when sitting before his tent cooking rations; for, despite all the commissariat arrangements, there was much room for improvement in these particulars. We give a couple of sketches which will enable our readers to see how matter-of-fact and mechanically base were some of the soldier's employments when in camp. Men who would shrink from turning butcher in New York, boston or Philadelphia were forced by the resistless tide of circumstances to lend a hand to the killing a beeve and afterward to the dressing and cooking it."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Butchering Cattle

"Butchering and dressing cattle for distribution to the Federal Army. The romance and reality of life…

"A federal cavalry camp— Winter Quarters." -Gordy, 1916

Cavalry Camp

"A federal cavalry camp— Winter Quarters." -Gordy, 1916

"Cutting coarse forage into chaff. Hints to Soldiers in the camp and on campaign."— Frank Leslie, 1896

chaff

"Cutting coarse forage into chaff. Hints to Soldiers in the camp and on campaign."— Frank Leslie,…

"Scene in camp life- chimney architecture- the Federal soldiers at their camp fires."— Frank Leslie, 1896

chimney architecture

"Scene in camp life- chimney architecture- the Federal soldiers at their camp fires."— Frank Leslie,…

"Interior of the principal Confederate fortifications near New Berne, N. C., after their capture by the Federal forces under General Burnside, March 14th, 1862. In our previous parts we have given so complete a narrative of the New Berne Expedition that a very few words will suffice to explain our sketch. Fort Thompson was one of the forts situated on the Neuse to defend the city against a naval force. Of the appearance after its capture our artist said: 'Had the garrison been worthy of the fortification this place might have given our gunboats some trouble; but, after receiving a few of the well-directed shells sent by Commodore Rowan, the place was ours.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Fortifications

"Interior of the principal Confederate fortifications near New Berne, N. C., after their capture by…

"Army cookhouse constructed in an old chimney of an outhouse of the Lacy Mansion, on the Rappahannock, Falmouth, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

cookhouse

"Army cookhouse constructed in an old chimney of an outhouse of the Lacy Mansion, on the Rappahannock,…

The kitchen of the Fremont Dragoons at Tipton, Missouri. Tipton, which is 38 miles from Jefferson City, 26 from Sedalia and 13 from California City, is situated on the Pacific Railway, which passes through Jefferson City, and has its terminus in Sedalia. At all these cities large bodies of troops were places by General Fremont, so as to enable him to concentrate, at a very short time, an overwhelming force to bear upon the Confederates. This is the kitchen when the army of cooks was in full preparation for the daily dinner.

Cooking in Camp

The kitchen of the Fremont Dragoons at Tipton, Missouri. Tipton, which is 38 miles from Jefferson City,…

"Distributing rations and appointing a knapsack guard before a reconnoissance near Warrentown, Va. Our sketch represents the Federal soldiers receiving their rations and the appointment of a guard for their knapsacks. Thanks to our illustration, the exempts, whether sneaks, aliens, valetudinarians, or members of that peace society, the Home Guards, could get a pretty accurate idea of a soldier's life, and be present in spirit with their noble brothers on whom they had devolved the sacred duty of battle."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Distributing

"Distributing rations and appointing a knapsack guard before a reconnoissance near Warrentown, Va. Our…

The influx of Northern regiments of troops into Washington during the early days of the war rendered that city every hour in the day a scene of exciting and beautiful military display. The grounds north of the Capitol were used for brilliant dress parades and drills, which attrected throng of visitors from all parts of the city and Surrounding places. The various regiments had their cliques of admiring friends, who deemed the evolutoins of their favorites entirely unapproachable. All the troops however, in their drill and bearing were considered worthy of warm praise, and called loud cheers from the spectators.

Drilling Troops

The influx of Northern regiments of troops into Washington during the early days of the war rendered…

"Camp of the Garibaldi Guards, Colonel D'utassy, near Roche's Mills, Va., Potomac River in the distance. The fine body of men called the Garibaldi Guards were remarkable for the number of trained men in its ranks, at least one-half having fought in European battlefields. It comprised Frenchmen, Italians, Hungarians, Germans, Swiss, Irish, Scotch, and a few English who had served in the Crimean War. When reviewed by the President, on their arrival at Washington, they were highly commended. They formed a part of Blenker's brigade, and were stationed near Roche's Mills, in a most picturesque spot, rendered more so by the foreign tastes of some of the Garibaldians."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Garibaldi Guards

"Camp of the Garibaldi Guards, Colonel D'utassy, near Roche's Mills, Va., Potomac River in the distance.…

"Horseshoeing in the army. Not like the country blacksmith, by the highroad upon the skirt of the village, with children peering around, and all men, from the squire to the poorly paid minister, stopping to get his services or to chat, does the army smith ply his labors. But even with his toils and risks he is better off than the toiling craftsman in the close lanes of the city, and does his needed labor under the shady tree or leafy roofing of a rustic shed in summer, and in the warmest nook he can find in winter, he will doubtless in other years recount to his wondering grandchildren the story of the great battles in Virginia, if he does not attribute the final success to his own handiwork. The regular army forge is a four-wheeled carriage, the front, or limber, of which is like that of a caisson, bearing a box about four feet long by two in width, containing the anvil, tongs and other implements, with a limited supply of iron for immediate use; on the rear wheel is a box containing the bellows, worked by a lever. In front of this is a cast-iron ash pan for the fire, with a sheet-iron back. On the stock is a vise, and the back of the box is a receptacle for coal. The whole is very compact, and on the march takes up very little room, the men riding on the limber box."— Frank Leslie, 1896

horseshoeing

"Horseshoeing in the army. Not like the country blacksmith, by the highroad upon the skirt of the village,…

"Land practice of sailors with the Dahlgren Howitzer Boat Gun, sponging out the gun."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Land practice

"Land practice of sailors with the Dahlgren Howitzer Boat Gun, sponging out the gun."— Frank Leslie,…

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special artist sent us some sketches which belond more to the romance of war than its struggle. This image shows midnight outside the tent in the West."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Midnight in the West

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special…

"The morning detail of the Fourth New Hampshire Volunteers going to work on the Hilton Head Fortifications. The morning detail of a regiment going to work on the fortifications was rather a merry and a peculiar sight. Instead of rifles and cannon, the heroes were armed with shovels, hoes, spades, pickaxes and trowels, while their train of artillery was a battery of wheelbarrows. Above all the troubles, ravages and cares of a campaign rose that indomitable cheerfulnes and willingness so characteristic of the American."— Frank Leslie, 1896

morning detail

"The morning detail of the Fourth New Hampshire Volunteers going to work on the Hilton Head Fortifications.…

"'Fresh Bread!'- Impromptu oven built by the Nineteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers, in General Banks's division, Western Maryland. The impromptu oven which we illustrate testified to the Federal cleverness, and ministered to the wants of the brave defenders of the Union. The regiment undoubtedly contained men whose means gave them every epicurean indulgence; but we question if any French bread, fresh butter, with all the appliances of Delmonico, ever tasted so sweet as the newly baked bread they got from the primitive oven." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Oven

"'Fresh Bread!'- Impromptu oven built by the Nineteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers, in General Banks's…

"Captain Muller's Battery Company of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Regiment making fascines and gabions for breastworks. Fascines have long been employed in temporary defenses, the word being derived from <em>facis</em>, the Latin for <em>bundle</em>. In fortification, fascines stand for a fagot, a bundle of rods or small sticks of wood, bound at both eds and in the middle, used in raising batteries, in filling ditches and making parapets. Sometimes they are dipped in melted pitch or tar, and made use of to set fire to the enemy's works or lodgments. A gabion in fortification is a hollow cylinder of wickerwork, resembling a basket but having no bottom. This is filled with earth, and so serves to shelter the men from the enemy's fire. During the preparatory work of concentrating and organizing the army in Kentucky opportunities were afforded for perfecting the men in knowledge of this practical part of war and erecting fortifications. Captain Muller, who was in command of the battery attached to Colonel Stambaugh's Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Regiment, was an accomplished officer, having served with much distinction in the Prussian Army. Our illustration represents the men cutting down the oak saplings, using the trunks, branches and twigs in fastening the gabions, the pointed stakes of which are ranged in a continuous line, forming a complete breastwork." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

77th Pennsylvania Regiment

"Captain Muller's Battery Company of the Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Regiment making fascines and gabions…

"Sketches of army life- weighing out rations."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Rations

"Sketches of army life- weighing out rations."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Typical Confederate Soldier dressed in full uniform with weapon.

Confederate Soldier

Typical Confederate Soldier dressed in full uniform with weapon.

Typical Union Soldier dressed in full uniform with weapon.

Union Soldier

Typical Union Soldier dressed in full uniform with weapon.

An illustration of a group of confederate soldiers walking in full uniform and armed.

Confederate Soldiers

An illustration of a group of confederate soldiers walking in full uniform and armed.

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special artist sent us some sketches which belond more to the romance of war than its struggle. This image shows sunrise in the West."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Sunrise in the West

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special…

An illustration of a missionary tent in a Civil War camp.

Missionary Tent

An illustration of a missionary tent in a Civil War camp.

"Siege of Vicksburg. Life in the trenches- bivouac of Leggett's Brigade- McPherson's Corps at the White House. Our illustration shows the life led by the besieging troops. The deep ravine is studded with the rude huts, or quarters, burrowed in the earth. Here, at the White House, well riddled with Confederate shell, were bivouacked Leggett's Brigade of McPherson's Seventeenth Army Corps. To the left of the house an opening in the bank shows the entrance to the covered way by which the Confederate works were approached. The operation of mining the enemy's works is here shown. This was conducted by Captain Hickenloper, Chief Engineer of General McPherson's Staff. The sketch was made in the sap, within fifteen feet of the Confederate Fort Hill, behind which lay the Confederate sharpshooters, held at bay by Coonskin and other riflemen eagerly on the lookout for a Confederate head."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Siege of Vicksburg

"Siege of Vicksburg. Life in the trenches- bivouac of Leggett's Brigade- McPherson's Corps at the White…

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special artist sent us some sketches which belond more to the romance of war than its struggle. Among them is a most characteristic scene in which two phases of civilization meet. We allude to the sketch where the Indian warriors are giving a war dance by firelight in the presence of the officers and soldiers of General Asboth's division. Sad and suggestive spectacle! Pagans and Christians traveling as companions on the same war path."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

War Dance

"Camp life in the West. During one of the pauses in the active part of the Missouri campaign our special…

"Water skin and mode of carrying. Hints to Soldiers in the camp and on campaign."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

water skin

"Water skin and mode of carrying. Hints to Soldiers in the camp and on campaign."— Frank Leslie,…

"Winter quarters on the Rappahannock- army huts of the One Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, near Falmouth, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Winter quarters

"Winter quarters on the Rappahannock- army huts of the One Hundred and Nineteenth Regiment, Pennsylvania…

Zouave was the title given to certain infantry regiments in the French army, normally serving in French North Africa between 1831 and 1962. The name was also adopted during the 19th century by units in other armies, especially volunteer regiments raised for service in the American Civil War. The 11th New York was initially led by Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth, until his death in 1861. The regiment was badly mauled during the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861 as it acted as the rear guard for the retreating Army of the Potomac.

Ellsworth Zouave

Zouave was the title given to certain infantry regiments in the French army, normally serving in French…