The Knots ClipArt gallery offers 119 illustrations of different types of knots, showing detailed steps on how to handle the rope or thread and tie the knot. Although many of the knots included in this gallery have nautical applications, they are also used in many other fields.

Flemish loop. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing part" of the rope is the part opposite the free end.

Knots

Flemish loop. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing part" of the rope is the…

Chain knot and toggle. The toggle is pulled to tighten up all the loops. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing part" of the rope is the part opposite the free end.

Knots

Chain knot and toggle. The toggle is pulled to tighten up all the loops. Note: the loop of a knot is…

Sheepshank. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing part" of the rope is the part opposite the free end.

Knots

Sheepshank. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing part" of the rope is the…

Bowline on a bight show in two stages. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing part" of the rope is the part opposite the free end.

Knots

Bowline on a bight show in two stages. Note: the loop of a knot is called the "bright." The "standing…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. The simplest knot is the common one tied on the end of a thread or cord to prevent it slipping. By passing a loop instead of the end of the cord the common slip knot (fig. 1) is formed."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. A useful fixed loop is got by tying a simple knot, or the 'figure of 8 knot' (2) on the loop of a cord."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. One of the simplest and most useful running knots for a small cord is made by means of two simple knots (3)."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. The most secure method of fastening a line to, say, a bucket is the standing bowline (4); and a running bowline is formed by passing the end a through the loop b, thus making a running loop."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. Another good knot to make fast a bucket is the anchor bend (5)."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. Out of the score or so of methods of fastening a boat's painter the one which will be found most useful is the well-known two half-hitches (6)."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. The timber hitch (7) is useful for attaching a line to a spar or a stone."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. The clove hitch (8) is invaluable for many purposes. It is very simple and cannot slip."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. A simple method of fastening a rope to a hook is the blackwall hitch (9), where the strain on the main rope jams the end so tightly against he hook that it cannot slip. "—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. There are many methods for shortening a rope temporarily, one of them being the sheepshank, the simplest form of which is shown in fig. 10."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. Of the methods for uniting the ends of two cords the simplest and one of the most secure is the common reef knot (11), which must be carefully distinguished from the granny (12), which will jam it it does not slip; the reef knot will do neither."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. Of the methods for uniting the ends of two cords the simplest and one of the most secure is the common reef knot (11), which must be carefully distinguished from the granny (12), which will jam it it does not slip; the reef knot will do neither."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. For very small cords or thread the best knot is the weaver's (13)."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. The fisherman's knot is a very useful one for anglers, and is formed by a simple knot in each cord being slipped over the other (14); when drawn taut it is very secure, and it is easily separated by pulling the short ends."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. A useful method of uniting large ropes is shown in figure 15: tie a simple knot on the end of one rope and interlace the end of the other, and draw taut. This tie may also be made with the figure of 8 knot."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. For very large ropes the carrick bend (16) is the simplest and most secure. The bowline bend is formed by looping two bowline knots into each other."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. Generally, the requirements of a useful knot may be stated to be that it should neither 'slip' nor 'jam'– I. e. that, while it holds without danger of slipping while the strain is on it, when slackened it should be easily untied again. For attaching a small line to a thick rope the becket hitch (17) is very useful."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. 'Splicing' is the process employed to join two ropes when it is not advisable to use a knot. The three chief varieties of the splice are the short splice, the long splice, and the eye splice. The short splice is made by unlaying the ends of two ropes for a short distance and fitting them closer together; then, by the help of a marlinspike, the ends are laced over and under the strands of the opposite rope, as shown in figure 18. When each strand has been passed through once, half of it is cut away and the remainder passed through again; half of the remainder being also cut away, it is passed a third time, and, when all the strands are so treated, they are hauled taut and cut close. This reducing the thickness of the strands tapers off the splice."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. 'Splicing' is the process employed to join two ropes when it is not advisable to use a knot. The three chief varieties of the splice are the short splice, the long splice, and the eye splice. The eye splice is, as the term implies, used to form an eye, or round a dead eye, and is shown finished in figure 19."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords. To prevent a rope fraying at the ends a variety of methods are employed, the simplest being to serve or whip the end with a small cord. Other methods are by interlacing the ends, one of which, the single wall, is shown at figure 20, the ends afterward being drawn taut and cut short."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Knots and Splices

"Knots and splices include all the various methods of tying, fastening, and joining ropes or cords.…

"Knotting Yarns -- This operation becomes necessary when a comparatively short piece of junk is to be make into a spun-yarn, or large rope into small, which is called twice laid. The end of each is divided, rubbed smooth and married (as for splicing). Two of the divided parts, as c, c and d, d, are passed in opposite directions round all the other parts and knotted. The ends e and f remain passive. The figure is drawn open, but the forks of A and B should be pressed close together, the knot hauled taut and the ends cut off." -Britannica, 1910

Knotting Yarns

"Knotting Yarns -- This operation becomes necessary when a comparatively short piece of junk is to be…

A noose in a rope or string.

Loop

A noose in a rope or string.

A Manrope knot is a decorative kind of rope button. The original use of a manrope knot was to put at the end of the ropes on either side of a gangway leading onto a ship. This knot is often confused with a Turks head knot, as both knots have a basket weave pattern.

Manrope Knot

A Manrope knot is a decorative kind of rope button. The original use of a manrope knot was to put at…

"Marling-spike Hitch -- Lay the end a over c; fold the loop over on the standing part b; then pass the marline-spike through, over both parts of the bight and under the prt b. Used for tightening each turn of a seizing." -Britannica, 1910

Marling-spike Hitch

"Marling-spike Hitch -- Lay the end a over c; fold the loop over on the standing part b; then pass the…

An illustration of marrying two ropes.

Marrying of Ropes

An illustration of marrying two ropes.

"Matthew Walker -- Unlay the end of a rope. Take the first strand round the rope, and through its own bight; the second strand round the rope, though the bight of the first, and though its own bight; the third through the all three bights. Haul the ends taut." -Britannica, 1910

Matthew Walker

"Matthew Walker -- Unlay the end of a rope. Take the first strand round the rope, and through its own…

"Midshipman's Hitch -- Take two round turns inside the bight, the same as a half-hitch repeated; stop up the end or let another half-hitch be taken or held by hand. Used for hooking a tackle for temporary purpose." -Brittanica, 1910

Midshipman's Hitch

"Midshipman's Hitch -- Take two round turns inside the bight, the same as a half-hitch repeated; stop…

An illustration of the overhand knot. "Used at the end of ropes to prevent their unreeving nd as the commencement of other knots. Take the end a round the end b." -Britannica, 1910

Overhand Knot

An illustration of the overhand knot. "Used at the end of ropes to prevent their unreeving nd as the…

"Racking Seizing -- A running eye having been spliced round one part of the rope, the ine is passed entirely round the other part, crossed back round the first part, and so for ten to twenty turns..." -Britannica, 1910

Racking Seizing

"Racking Seizing -- A running eye having been spliced round one part of the rope, the ine is passed…

An illustration of a reef knot. "Form an overhand knot...then take the end a over the end b and through the bight." -Britannica, 1910

Reef Knot

An illustration of a reef knot. "Form an overhand knot...then take the end a over the end b and through…

An illustration of a reef knot. "Form an overhand knot...then take the end a over the end b and through the bight." -Britannica, 1910

Reef Knot

An illustration of a reef knot. "Form an overhand knot...then take the end a over the end b and through…

"Rolling Hitch -- Two round turns are taken round a spar or large rope in the direction on which it is to be hauled and one half-hitch on the other side of the hauling part. This is very useful, as it can be put on and off quickly." -Britannica, 1910

Rolling Hitch

"Rolling Hitch -- Two round turns are taken round a spar or large rope in the direction on which it…

Piece of rope.

Rope

Piece of rope.

An illustration of a round seizing knot.

Round Seizing

An illustration of a round seizing knot.

Two seizings, a class of knots used to bind two parts of the same rope or to another object.

Seizing

Two seizings, a class of knots used to bind two parts of the same rope or to another object.

"Sheep-Shank -- Formed by making a long bight in a topgallant back stay, or any rope which it is desirable to shorten, and taking a half-hitch near each bend, as at a, a. Rope-yarn stops at b, b are desirable to keep it in place till the strain is brought up on it. Wire rope cannot be so treated, and it is injurious to hemp rope that is large and stiff." -Britannica, 1910

Sheep-Shank

"Sheep-Shank -- Formed by making a long bight in a topgallant back stay, or any rope which it is desirable…

The sheepshank is "a kind of knot, hitch, or bend made on a rope to shorten it temporarily." -Whitney, 1911

Sheepshank

The sheepshank is "a kind of knot, hitch, or bend made on a rope to shorten it temporarily." -Whitney,…

"Sheet Bend -- Pass the end of one rope though the bight of another, round both parts of the other, and under its own standing part. Used for bending small sheets to the clews of sails, which present bights ready for the hitch. An ordinary net is composed of a series of sheet bends. A weaver's knot is made like a sheet bend." -Britannica, 1910

Sheet Bend

"Sheet Bend -- Pass the end of one rope though the bight of another, round both parts of the other,…

"The most common description of splice is when a rope is lengthened by another of the same size, or nearly so." -Britannica, 1910

Short Splice

"The most common description of splice is when a rope is lengthened by another of the same size, or…

"Shroud Knot -- Pass a stop at such a distance from each end of the broken shroud as to afford sufficient length of strands, when it is unlaid, to form a single wall knot on each side after the parts have been married." -Britannica, 1910

Shroud Knot

"Shroud Knot -- Pass a stop at such a distance from each end of the broken shroud as to afford sufficient…

"A knot by which the two parts of a shroud which has been broken or shot away are reunited." -Whitney, 1911

Shroud Knots

"A knot by which the two parts of a shroud which has been broken or shot away are reunited." -Whitney,…

"Single Wall Crowned -- Form a single wall, and lay one of the ends, a, over the knot. Lay b over a, and c over b and through the bight of a. Hail the ends taut." -Britannica, 1910

Single Wall Crowned

"Single Wall Crowned -- Form a single wall, and lay one of the ends, a, over the knot. Lay b over a,…

"Single wall knot -- Unlay the end of a rope, and with the strand a form a bight. Take the next strand b round the end of a. Take the last stand c round the end of b and though the bight made by a. Haul the ends taut." -Britannica, 1910

Single Wall Knot

"Single wall knot -- Unlay the end of a rope, and with the strand a form a bight. Take the next strand…

"Slings -- This is simply the bight of a rope turned up over its own part; it is frequently made of chain, when a shackle (bow up) takes the place of the bight at s and another at y, connecting the two ends with the part which goes round the mast-head." -Britannica, 1910

Slings

"Slings -- This is simply the bight of a rope turned up over its own part; it is frequently made of…

An illustration of a Spanish windlass knot.

Spanish Windlass

An illustration of a Spanish windlass knot.

"Eye-splice. A sort of eye or circle formed by splicing the end of a rope into itself. a, one strand stuck; b, all three strands stuck once; c, all three strands stuck three times (finished splicing)." -Whitney, 1911

Eye Splice in Three Steps

"Eye-splice. A sort of eye or circle formed by splicing the end of a rope into itself. a, one strand…

"In making a short splice the ends of the ropes are unlaid for a short distance and brought together, the strands interlacing (A). Taking any one strand, this is woven into the laid strands of the other rope, working from left to right; the other two stands are similarly woven, but from right to left."—Finley, 1917

Short splice

"In making a short splice the ends of the ropes are unlaid for a short distance and brought together,…

"Sprit-Sail Sheet Knot -- This knot consists of a double wall and double crown made by the two ends, consequently with six strands, with the ends turned down. Used formerly in the clews of sails, now as an excellent stopper, a lashing or shackle being placed at s and a lanyard round the head at l." -Britannica, 1910

Sprit-Sail Sheet Knot

"Sprit-Sail Sheet Knot -- This knot consists of a double wall and double crown made by the two ends,…

"Naut., a contrivance, consisting of two wooden deadeyes and a rope lanyard, for quickly securing any standing rigging shot away in action." -Whitney, 1911

Fighting Stopper

"Naut., a contrivance, consisting of two wooden deadeyes and a rope lanyard, for quickly securing any…

"Studding-sail halyard bend -- Similar to the [Fisherman's Bend], except that the end is tucked under the first round turn; this is more snug. A magnus hitch has two round turns and one on the other side of the standing part with the end through the bight."

Studding-sail Halyard Bend

"Studding-sail halyard bend -- Similar to the [Fisherman's Bend], except that the end is tucked under…

"Timber Hitch -- Take the end of a of a rope round a spar then round the standing part b, then several times round its own part c, against the lay of the rope." -Britannica, 1910

Timber Hitch

"Timber Hitch -- Take the end of a of a rope round a spar then round the standing part b, then several…

"Turk's Head -- With fine line (very dry) make a clove hitch round the rope; cross the bights twice, passing an end the reverse way (up or down) each time; then keeping the whole spread flat, let each end follow it own part round and round till it is too tight to received any more." -Britannica, 1910

Turk's Head

"Turk's Head -- With fine line (very dry) make a clove hitch round the rope; cross the bights twice,…

An illustration of a Turning in a Dead-Eye Cutter-Stay Fashion knot.

Turning in a Dead-Eye Cutter-Stay Fashion

An illustration of a Turning in a Dead-Eye Cutter-Stay Fashion knot.

An illustration of a Turning in a Dead-Eye End Up knot.

Turning in a Dead-Eye End Up

An illustration of a Turning in a Dead-Eye End Up knot.

"Two Half-Hitches -- The half-hitch repeated; this is commonly used, and is capable of resisting to the full strength of the rope." -Brittanica, 1910

Two Half-Hitches

"Two Half-Hitches -- The half-hitch repeated; this is commonly used, and is capable of resisting to…