This ClipArt gallery offers 244 illustrations of ancient Roman architecture. Roman architecture adopted many styles from the Greek, and is most noted for their expert implementation and frequent use of the arch and dome.

The most interesting monuments of Etruscan architecture which have been preserved are the tombs. They are for the most part chambers hewn in the rock, and supported by square piers. The tombs were either subterranean, and had an entrance façade hewn out of the rock, or they assume the shape of tumuli, which had one or more conical elevations resting on a superstructure. Sometimes these tombs are quadrangular with a pyramidal superstructure

Etruscan Tomb at Castel d'Asso

The most interesting monuments of Etruscan architecture which have been preserved are the tombs. They…

"Facade of old St. Peters Rome." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Facade

"Facade of old St. Peters Rome." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Fenestella. In Roman Catholic churches, a niche on the south side of an altar, containing the piscina, and frequently also the credence." -Whitney, 1911

Fenestella in the Church of Norrey

"Fenestella. In Roman Catholic churches, a niche on the south side of an altar, containing the piscina,…

The forum was built on the order of Emperor Trajan with the spoils of war from the conquest of Dacia, which ended in 106. The Forum was built from a vast stoa-lined piazza measuring 660 by 390 feet (200 × 120 m) with exedrae on two sides. The Basilica Ulpia was an ancient Roman civic building located in the Forum of Trajan. It was named after Roman emperor Trajan whose full name was Marcus Ulpius Traianus.

Forum and Basilica of Trajan

The forum was built on the order of Emperor Trajan with the spoils of war from the conquest of Dacia,…

"Forum of Pompeii. A, principal entrance; B, a Corinthian temple; C, the public prison (carcer publicus); D is supposed to have been a horreum, or public granary; E, temple of Venus, the guardian goddess of the city; F, basilica; G, H, I, the curiae, or civil and commercial tribunals; K, a rectangular building which may have served the purpose of a shop for money-changers; L, a portico terminating in an apsis; M, temple of Mercury or Quirinus; N, a building with a large semicircular tribune, which probably constituted the residence of the priests called Augustales." -Whitney, 1911

Forum of Pompeii

"Forum of Pompeii. A, principal entrance; B, a Corinthian temple; C, the public prison (carcer publicus);…

"The Fountain Trevi." — Young, 1901

Trevi Fountain

"The Fountain Trevi." — Young, 1901

"Fragment of an Ancient Roman Frieze. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character of Roman architecture, and consequently became more massive and more copious itself. This is an example of enrichment of which vegetable objects were the model."

Ancient Roman Frieze

"Fragment of an Ancient Roman Frieze. The ornamentation had to correspond with the massive character…

"A Frieze, in architecture, is that portion of the entablature which is between the architrave and the cornice. It was generally adorned with triglyphs in the Doric order. The term frieze was also applied to a broad band of sculpture, in low relief, that was frequently placed round the cella of a Grecian temple, immediately under the ceiling of the portico, and completely surrounding the exterior."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Roman-Doric Frieze

"A Frieze, in architecture, is that portion of the entablature which is between the architrave and the…

"A Frieze, in architecture, is that portion of the entablature which is between the architrave and the cornice. It was generally adorned with triglyphs in the Doric order. The term frieze was also applied to a broad band of sculpture, in low relief, that was frequently placed round the cella of a Grecian temple, immediately under the ceiling of the portico, and completely surrounding the exterior."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Roman-Doric Frieze

"A Frieze, in architecture, is that portion of the entablature which is between the architrave and the…

The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct and bridge that was built over the Gard River by the Roman Empire. It is located in Southern France, in the Vers-Pont-du-Gard and Remoulins area. The bridge is built on three levels. The lower level has 6 arches and carries a road, the middle level has 11 arches, and the upper level has 35 arches and was used as a water conduit.

Pont du Gard

The Pont du Gard is an aqueduct and bridge that was built over the Gard River by the Roman Empire. It…

The gate at Herculaneum. Herculaneum was an ancient Roman town famous for being preserved along with Pompeii.

Gate at Herculaneum

The gate at Herculaneum. Herculaneum was an ancient Roman town famous for being preserved along with…

Also known as the Castle of St. Angelo. A castle is a defensive structure seen as one of the main symbols of the Middle Ages.

Hadrian's Castle, Rome

Also known as the Castle of St. Angelo. A castle is a defensive structure seen as one of the main symbols…

The tomb of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, in Rome.

Hadrian's Tomb

The tomb of the Roman Emperor Hadrian, in Rome.

"The Greeks and Romans used hinges exactly like those now in common use. The following cut exhibits four Roman hinges of bronze, now preserved in the British Museum." — Anthon, 1891

Roman hinges

"The Greeks and Romans used hinges exactly like those now in common use. The following cut exhibits…

The Pompeiian house consisted of several courts or <em>atria</em>, some of which were surrounded by colonnades and called peristyles. The front portion was reserved for shops, or presented to the street a wall unbroken save by the entrance.Legend: s, shops; v, vestibule; f, family rooms; k, kitchen; l, lararium; p, peristyles

House of Pansa, Pompeii (Plan)

The Pompeiian house consisted of several courts or atria, some of which were surrounded by…

"House construction consists mainly of concrete or brick, and sometimes of stone blocks, especially at the corners. Two-storied, sometimes three-storied houses are numerous, though the upper floors, built of wood, have been consumed by the eruption. Stores usually occupied the ground floors of dwelling-houses, on their street aspect, let out to merchants or dealers as at the present day, but not connected with the back part of the house. They could be separated from the street by large wooden doors, while inside they had tables covered with marble, in which earthen vessels for wine or oil were inserted. The storekeeper had sometimes a second room at the back, when he did not live on an upper floor or in another part of the town."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Pompeiian House

"House construction consists mainly of concrete or brick, and sometimes of stone blocks, especially…

Part of ancient Roman architecture, a basin in the atrium or entrance hall of a building, to receive rain

Impluvium

Part of ancient Roman architecture, a basin in the atrium or entrance hall of a building, to receive…

Roman Ionic capital, front and side views.

Ionic Capital

Roman Ionic capital, front and side views.

Roman Ionic capital, front and side views.

Ionic Capital

Roman Ionic capital, front and side views.

The framework in Ionic style of the Temple of Fortuna Virilis at Rome.

Ionic Frame

The framework in Ionic style of the Temple of Fortuna Virilis at Rome.

Temple of Fortuna Virilis.

Ionic Order

Temple of Fortuna Virilis.

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being practiced in mainland Greece in the 5th century BC. The first of the great Ionic temples was the Temple of Hera on Samos, built about 570 BC-560 BC by the architect Rhoikos. It stood for only a decade before it was leveled by an earthquake. It was in the great sanctuary of the goddess: it could scarcely have been in a more prominent location for its brief lifetime. A longer-lasting 6th century Ionic temple was the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Roman Ionic Order

The Ionic order column originated in the mid-6th century BC in Ionia. The Ionic order column was being…

"The door in front of a temple, as it reeached nearly to the ceiling allowed the worshippers to view from without the entire statue of the divinity, and to observe the rites performed before it. The whole light of the building, moreover, was commonly admitted through the same aperture. These circumstances are illustrated in the following cut, showing the front of a small temple of Jupiter taken from an ancient bas-relief." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Temple of Jupiter

"The door in front of a temple, as it reeached nearly to the ceiling allowed the worshippers to view…

"The Benedictine system enjoined three virtues as essential; solitude, humility, and obedience." &mdash; Young, 1901

Cloister of the Lateran

"The Benedictine system enjoined three virtues as essential; solitude, humility, and obedience." —…

The Maison Carr&eacute;e at N&icirc;mes in southern France is one of the best preserved temples to be found anywhere in the territory of the former Roman Empire. It was built c. 16 <small>BC</small> by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, who was also the original patron of the Pantheon in Rome, and was dedicated to his two sons, Gaius Julius Caesar and Lucius Caesar, adopted heirs of Augustus who both died young.

Maison Carrée

The Maison Carrée at Nîmes in southern France is one of the best preserved temples to be…

Gaius Marius was a Roman general and politician elected consul an unprecedented seven times during his career. He was also noted for his dramatic reforms of Roman armies, authorizing recruitment of landless citizens and reorganizing the structure of the legions into separate cohorts.

Bust of Marius

Gaius Marius was a Roman general and politician elected consul an unprecedented seven times during his…

Marcus Antonius, known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and General. He was an important supporter and the best friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, being Caesar's second cousin, once removed, by his mother Julia Antonia. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate.

Bust of Mark Antony

Marcus Antonius, known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and General. He was an important…

"The Villa Medici, from the Terrace." &mdash; Young, 1901

Villa Medici

"The Villa Medici, from the Terrace." — Young, 1901

A type of fancy roman architecture.

Chevron Molding

A type of fancy roman architecture.

"For tombs of smaller dimensions various forms and abnormal decorations were employed. An ornamented erection of a shape similar to an altar or a temple, and resting on a solid substructure, is a by no means uncommon form. Many tombs are constructed like real temples, while others consist only of simple columns."

Tomb of Nævoleia Tyche at Pompeii

"For tombs of smaller dimensions various forms and abnormal decorations were employed. An ornamented…

The arena of Nimes is a roman amphitheater located in city of Nimes, France. The amphitheater was built around 70 A.D. during the time of Emperor Caesar Augustus. The structure is designed in an enclosed ellipsis.

The Arena of Nimes

The arena of Nimes is a roman amphitheater located in city of Nimes, France. The amphitheater was built…

The square house of Nimes is also known as Maison Carree. It is an ancient Roman temple located in Nimes, Souther France. It was built by Roman statesman and general, Marcus Agrippa in dedication to his sons. The temple is made up of corinthian columns in the front entrance and attached columns all around the structure.

The Square House of Nimes

The square house of Nimes is also known as Maison Carree. It is an ancient Roman temple located in Nimes,…

A roman moulding, called a <em>Ovolo.</em> It is composed of a quarter of a circle and an upper and lower fillet. Without the addition of the fillet it is called a <em>Quarter Round</em>. Its construction is made apparent by referring to the figure.

Ovolo

A roman moulding, called a Ovolo. It is composed of a quarter of a circle and an upper and…

Diocletian's Palace (Dioklecijanova palaca in Croatian) is a building in Split in Croatia that was built by the emperor Diocletian at the turn of the fourth century AD. The Latin name of the city, Spalatum, was drawn from that of the nearby Greek colony Aspalathos, which in turn was named after a white thorn common in the area. Contrary to popular belief, it has nothing to do with the Latin word for palace, palatium.

Palace of Diocletian, Plan

Diocletian's Palace (Dioklecijanova palaca in Croatian) is a building in Split in Croatia that was built…

"The Palantine from the Aventine." &mdash; Young, 1901

Palatine

"The Palantine from the Aventine." — Young, 1901

"The finest monument of this time is the Pantheon of Rome, first built about B.C. 27, which is one of the grandest buildings of the ancient world. Whether it was erected as a Temple or as a Hall attached to the Thermae of Agrippa is a moot point. It is even now in a sufficient good state of preservation for us to be able to judge of what it was." —D'Anvers, 1895

Pantheon

"The finest monument of this time is the Pantheon of Rome, first built about B.C. 27, which is one of…

The Pantheon is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt circa 125 AD during Hadrian's reign. Since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Catholic church. The Pantheon is currently the oldest standing domed structure in Rome.

The Pantheon at Rome

The Pantheon is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to all the gods of Ancient…

"The most important and most beautiful of circular buildings without columns surrounding it is the Pantheon at Rome, which was completed in the reign of Augustus, in the year 25 A.D."

Façade of the Pantheon at Rome

"The most important and most beautiful of circular buildings without columns surrounding it is the Pantheon…

"The most important and most beautiful of circular buildings without columns surrounding it is the Pantheon at Rome, which was completed in the reign of Augustus, in the year 25 A.D."

Interior of the Pantheon at Rome

"The most important and most beautiful of circular buildings without columns surrounding it is the Pantheon…

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has a leaf and floral design, then it volutes with a spiral scroll like ornaments on the sides. It is found in the temple of Mars in Rome.

Roman-Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has a leaf and floral design, then it volutes with a spiral scroll…

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has an egg-and-dart moulding that runs along the bottom, then it volutes with a spiral scroll like ornaments on the sides.

Roman-Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has an egg-and-dart moulding that runs along the bottom, then…

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has an egg-and-dart moulding that runs along the bottom, then it volutes with a spiral scroll like ornaments on the sides.

Roman-Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has an egg-and-dart moulding that runs along the bottom, then…

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has a leaf and floral design, then it volutes with a spiral scroll like ornaments on the sides.

Roman-Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has a leaf and floral design, then it volutes with a spiral scroll…

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has a leaf and floral design, then it volutes with a spiral scroll like ornaments on the sides. It is found in the temple of Pantheon in Rome.

Roman-Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Roman-Corinthian pilaster capital has a leaf and floral design, then it volutes with a spiral scroll…

This is an illustration of the Amphitheater of Pola. It is 450 feet long and 360 broad. A temple and several ancient gates are also extant.

Pola Amphitheater

This is an illustration of the Amphitheater of Pola. It is 450 feet long and 360 broad. A temple and…

"The following cut gives a view of of a portion of the paved street at the entrance of Pompeii. The upper surface consists of large polygonal blocks of the hardest stone, fitted and jointed with the utmost nicety, so as to present a perfectly even surface, as free from gaps or irregularities, as if the whole had been one solid mass." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Pompeii

"The following cut gives a view of of a portion of the paved street at the entrance of Pompeii. The…

"Section of the Baths of Pompeii." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Pompeii Baths

"Section of the Baths of Pompeii." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

The ground plan of the baths of Pompeii, Italy.

Baths of Pompeii

The ground plan of the baths of Pompeii, Italy.

"For tombs of smaller dimensions various forms and abnormal decorations were employed. An ornamented erection of a shape similar to an altar or a temple, and resting on a solid substructure, is a by no means uncommon form. Many tombs are constructed like real temples, while others consist only of simple columns. These tombs were generally erected in rows along the main roads before the entrance to a town, so as to form a street of tombs, an arrangement which is still to be seen at Pompeii."

Street of Tombs at Pompeii

"For tombs of smaller dimensions various forms and abnormal decorations were employed. An ornamented…

An illustration of the streets of Pompeii. Pompeii is a ruined and partially buried Roman town-city near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania, in the territory of the comune of Pompei. Along with Herculaneum, its sister city, Pompeii was destroyed, and completely buried, during a long catastrophic eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius spanning two days in AD 79.

Streets of Pompeii

An illustration of the streets of Pompeii. Pompeii is a ruined and partially buried Roman town-city…

This illustration shows the amphitheater in the ancient city of Pompeii.

Pompeiian Amphitheater

This illustration shows the amphitheater in the ancient city of Pompeii.

This illustration shows a house built in the ancient city of Pompeii.

Pompeiian House

This illustration shows a house built in the ancient city of Pompeii.

Pompeiian molding.

Pompeiian Molding

Pompeiian molding.

Pompeiian molding.

Pompeiian Molding

Pompeiian molding.

Pompeiian molding.

Pompeiian Molding

Pompeiian molding.

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Aelius

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Ariminum

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Cestius

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited extent, it is probable that the Greek bridges were built entirely of wood, or, at best, were nothing more than a wooden platform supported upon stone piers at each extremity. Pliny mentions a bridge over the Acheron 1000 feet in length; and also says that the island Euboea was joined to Boeotia by a bridge; but it is probably that both these works were executed after the Roman conquest. The Romans were the first people who applied the arch to the construction of bridges, by which they were enabled to erect structures of great beauty and solidity, as well as utility. The width of the passage-way in a roman bridge was commonly narrow, as compared with modern structures of the same kind, and corresponded with the road leading to and from it. It was divided into three parts. the centre one, for horses and carriages, was denominated agger or iter; and the raised foot paths on each side decursoria, which were enclosed by parapet walls similar in use and appearance to the pluteus in the basilica." — Smith, 1873

Pons Trajan

"A bridge. As the rivers of Greece were small, and the use of the arch known to them only to a limited…

The details of the Porta-Aura (Golden Gate) of the Diocletian Palace at Spalato.

Porta-Aura

The details of the Porta-Aura (Golden Gate) of the Diocletian Palace at Spalato.