This science ClipArt gallery offers 39 images of methods for producing power by water, including dams and water wheels.

The barker's mill is a device that rotates as water is poured in at top and comes out in opposite directions at the bottom.

Barker's Mill

The barker's mill is a device that rotates as water is poured in at top and comes out in opposite directions…

"In this water, instead of passing over, or entirely under the wheel, is delievered in the direction of its centre. This is one of the most common wheels, and is employed where there is not a sufficient fall for the construction of the overshot kind." -Comstock 1850

Breast Wheel

"In this water, instead of passing over, or entirely under the wheel, is delievered in the direction…

"Water enters the wheel halfway up and flows against the slots on the wheel. The wheel rotates with the flow of the water and the stream continues out the bottom of the wheel." —Quackenbos 1859

Breast Wheel

"Water enters the wheel halfway up and flows against the slots on the wheel. The wheel rotates with…

Waterwheel.

Breast-Wheel

Waterwheel.

"A wheel turned by the force of water which is level with its centre." — Williams, 1889

Breast-wheel

"A wheel turned by the force of water which is level with its centre." — Williams, 1889

A bank of earth, or any wall, or a frame of wood, to obstruct the flow of water.

Dam

A bank of earth, or any wall, or a frame of wood, to obstruct the flow of water.

An illustration of a simple dam; a dam is a barrier that impounds water or underground streams. Dams generally serve the primary purpose of retaining water, while other structures such as floodgates, levees, and dikes are used to manage or prevent water flow into specific land regions.

Simple Dam

An illustration of a simple dam; a dam is a barrier that impounds water or underground streams. Dams…

A watermill generating power.

Mill

A watermill generating power.

A mill wheel to generate power.

Mill-Wheel

A mill wheel to generate power.

"The Overshot wheel is a form of water wheel in which the water flows upon or near the top of the wheel. It acts principally by gravity, though some effect is of course due to the velocity with which the water arrives."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Overshot Wheel

"The Overshot wheel is a form of water wheel in which the water flows upon or near the top of the wheel.…

"This wheel of all others, gives the greatest power with the least quantity of water, and is, therefore, generally used when circumstances will permit, or where there is a considerable fall, with a limited quantity of water." -Comstock 1850

Overshot Wheel

"This wheel of all others, gives the greatest power with the least quantity of water, and is, therefore,…

"Wheel consists of flaps in the shape of buckets that are equally spaced. As water flows onto the wheel, the weight of the water in the buckets causes the wheel to rotate and empty the buckets." —Quackenbos 1859

Overshot Wheel

"Wheel consists of flaps in the shape of buckets that are equally spaced. As water flows onto the wheel,…

"A contrivance for raising liquids or for removing gases from vessels." -Marshall

Suction Pump

"A contrivance for raising liquids or for removing gases from vessels." -Marshall

Hydraulic tourniquet, also called Barker's mill. It consists of a vessel of water free to rotate about a vertical axis, and having at its lower end bent arms through which the water is discharged horizontally, the direction of discharge being nearly at right angles to a line joining the discharging orifice to the axis. The unbalanced pressures at the bends of the tube, opposite to the openings, cause the apparatus to revolve in the opposite direction to the issuing liquid.

Tourniquet

Hydraulic tourniquet, also called Barker's mill. It consists of a vessel of water free to rotate about…

"The most efficient form of water-wheel is the turbine, one form of which is shown." — Avery, 1895

Turbine

"The most efficient form of water-wheel is the turbine, one form of which is shown." — Avery,…

"A waterwheel which the water enters and leaves at all points on its circumference." -Foster, 1921

Turbine Wheel

"A waterwheel which the water enters and leaves at all points on its circumference." -Foster, 1921

"The general sectionl elevation of a Girard turbine, in which the flow is axial. The water, admitted above a horizontal floor, passes down through the annular wheel containing the guide-blades, G, and thence into the revolving wheel WW. The revolving wheel is fixed to a hollow shaft suspended from the pivot p. The solid internal shaft ss is merely a fixed column supporting the pivot. The advantage of this is that the pivot is accessible for lubrication and adjustment. B is the mortise bevel wheel by which the power of the turbine is given off. The sluices are worked by the hand wheel h, which raises them successively, in a way to be described presently. a is the sluice rods." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Girard Turbine

"The general sectionl elevation of a Girard turbine, in which the flow is axial. The water, admitted…

"In the "Hercules" turbine...the flow is what is called mixed, that is, it is partly a radial inward and partly an axial flow machine. On entering, the water flows at first in a radial direction, and the gradually, as it passes through the wheel, it receives a downward component which becomes more and more important" (Britannica, 383).

Hercules Turbine

"In the "Hercules" turbine...the flow is what is called mixed, that is, it is partly a radial inward…

A turbine that uses moving water to make it work. They are used in hydroelectricity plants.

Hydraulic Turbine

A turbine that uses moving water to make it work. They are used in hydroelectricity plants.

"This turbine was designed to give 1250 H.P. with a fall of 25 ft. and an efficiency of 77%. It is fitted with a suction pope and a circular balanced sluice for admitting and cutting off the water-siupply" (Britannica, 384).

Jonval Turbine

"This turbine was designed to give 1250 H.P. with a fall of 25 ft. and an efficiency of 77%. It is fitted…

"Turbine is, in mechanics, a term formerly confined to horizontal water wheels, the revolution of which is due to the pressure derived from falling water, but now applied generally to any wheel driven by water escaping through small orifices subject to such pressure. The turbine was invented by Fourneyron in 1823, and the first one was made in 1827. Air and steam turbines are also in use, air and steam being used instead of water to drive the impulse wheel."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Pelton Wheel Turbine

"Turbine is, in mechanics, a term formerly confined to horizontal water wheels, the revolution of which…

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines. It is one of the best even in normal conditions of working, and the mode of regulation introduced is decidedly superior to that in most reaction turbines; it might almost be said to be the only mode of regulation which satisfies the conditions of efficient working, and it has been adopted in a modified form in the Leffel turbine, which is now largely used in america. The turbine has suction pipes, which permit the turbine to be placed at any height less than 30 feet above the tail-water level. The water enters the turbine by cast-iron supply pipes at A, and is discharged through two suction pipes S. The water on entering the case distributes itself through a rectangular supply chamber SC, from which it finds its way equally to the four guide-blade passages G. In these passages it acquires a velocity about equal to that due to half the fall, and is directed into the wheel at an angle of about 10 or 12 degrees with the tangent to its circumference. The wheel W receives the water in equal proportions from each guide-blade passage." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Reaction Turbine

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines.…

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines. It is one of the best even in normal conditions of working, and the mode of regulation introduced is decidedly superior to that in most reaction turbines; it might almost be said to be the only mode of regulation which satisfies the conditions of efficient working, and it has been adopted in a modified form in the Leffel turbine, which is now largely used in america. The turbine has suction pipes, which permit the turbine to be placed at any height less than 30 feet above the tail-water level. The water enters the turbine by cast-iron supply pipes at A, and is discharged through two suction pipes S. The water on entering the case distributes itself through a rectangular supply chamber SC, from which it finds its way equally to the four guide-blade passages G. In these passages it acquires a velocity about equal to that due to half the fall, and is directed into the wheel at an angle of about 10 or 12 degrees with the tangent to its circumference. The wheel W receives the water in equal proportions from each guide-blade passage." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Reaction Turbine

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines.…

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines. It is one of the best even in normal conditions of working, and the mode of regulation introduced is decidedly superior to that in most reaction turbines; it might almost be said to be the only mode of regulation which satisfies the conditions of efficient working, and it has been adopted in a modified form in the Leffel turbine, which is now largely used in america. The turbine has suction pipes, which permit the turbine to be placed at any height less than 30 feet above the tail-water level. The water enters the turbine by cast-iron supply pipes at A, and is discharged through two suction pipes S. The water on entering the case distributes itself through a rectangular supply chamber SC, from which it finds its way equally to the four guide-blade passages G. In these passages it acquires a velocity about equal to that due to half the fall, and is directed into the wheel at an angle of about 10 or 12 degrees with the tangent to its circumference. The wheel W receives the water in equal proportions from each guide-blade passage." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Reaction Turbine

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines.…

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines. It is one of the best even in normal conditions of working, and the mode of regulation introduced is decidedly superior to that in most reaction turbines; it might almost be said to be the only mode of regulation which satisfies the conditions of efficient working, and it has been adopted in a modified form in the Leffel turbine, which is now largely used in america. The turbine has suction pipes, which permit the turbine to be placed at any height less than 30 feet above the tail-water level. The water enters the turbine by cast-iron supply pipes at A, and is discharged through two suction pipes S. The water on entering the case distributes itself through a rectangular supply chamber SC, from which it finds its way equally to the four guide-blade passages G. In these passages it acquires a velocity about equal to that due to half the fall, and is directed into the wheel at an angle of about 10 or 12 degrees with the tangent to its circumference. The wheel W receives the water in equal proportions from each guide-blade passage." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Reaction Turbine

"Professor James Thomson's inward flow or vortex turbine has been selected as the type of reaction turbines.…

"Water enters through J and K following into G and H compartments. Afterwards the water is forced into the outside compartments thus turning the wheel." —Quackenbos 1859

Water Turbine

"Water enters through J and K following into G and H compartments. Afterwards the water is forced into…

Any of various machines having a rotor, usually with vanes or blades, driven by the pressure, momentum, or reactive thrust of a moving fluid, as steam, water, hot gases, or air, either occurring in the form of free jets or as a fluid passing through and entirely filling a housing around the rotor.

Water Turbine

Any of various machines having a rotor, usually with vanes or blades, driven by the pressure, momentum,…

"Thus constructed, this wheel moves equally well whether the water acts on one or the other side of the boards, and hence is employed for tide wheels, which turn in one direction when the tide is going out, and in the other when it is coming in." -Comstock 1850

Undershot Wheel

"Thus constructed, this wheel moves equally well whether the water acts on one or the other side of…

"Waterwheel where the lowest flat-board is submerged in the running water. The water is often given its power from a slight inclination. This wheel is also often powered by the running water issued by a dam." —Quackenbos 1859

Undershot Wheel

"Waterwheel where the lowest flat-board is submerged in the running water. The water is often given…

"When a water fall ranges between 10 and 70 feet, and the water supply is from 3 to 25 cubic feet per second, it is possible to construct a bucket wheel on which the water acts chiefly by its weight. If the variation of the head-water level does not exceed 2 feet, an overshot wheel may be used. The water is then projected over the summit of the wheel, and falls in a parabolic path into the buckets. With greater variation of head-water level, a pitch-back or high breast wheel is better. The water falls over the top of a sliding sluice into the wheel, on the same side as the head race channel. By adjusting the height of the sluice, the requisite supply is given to the wheel in all positions of the head-water level. The wheel consists of a cast-iron or wrought-iron axle C supporting the weight of the wheel. To this are attached two sets of arms A of wood or iron, which support circular segmental plates termed shrouds B. A cylindrical sole plate dd extends between the shrouds on the inner side. The buckets are formed by wood planks or curved wrought-iron plates extending from shroud to shroud, the back of the buckets being formed by the sole plate." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Water Wheel

"When a water fall ranges between 10 and 70 feet, and the water supply is from 3 to 25 cubic feet per…

A wheel used to create energy by running water.

Water Wheel

A wheel used to create energy by running water.

A wheel used to create energy by running water.

Water Wheel

A wheel used to create energy by running water.

An image of the overshot wheel that operates machinery by water power, receiving water at the top.

Water Wheel

An image of the overshot wheel that operates machinery by water power, receiving water at the top.

An image of the breast wheel that operates machinery by water power, receiving water opposite the axle.

Water Wheel

An image of the breast wheel that operates machinery by water power, receiving water opposite the axle.

Water-belt for transmitting motion, from 1875.

Water-Belt

Water-belt for transmitting motion, from 1875.

A mill whose machinery is moved by water.

Water-mill

A mill whose machinery is moved by water.

Any wheel for propelling machinery or other purpose, that is made to rotate by the direct action of water.

Water-wheel

Any wheel for propelling machinery or other purpose, that is made to rotate by the direct action of…

"A wheel driven by water shot over the top. The buckets of the wheel receive the water as nearly as possible at the top, and retain it until they approach the lowest point of the decent. The water acts principally by its gravity, though some effect is of course due to the velocity with which it arrives." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Water-wheel

"A wheel driven by water shot over the top. The buckets of the wheel receive the water as nearly as…

"In the overshot wheel, the water falls into buckets at the top, and by its weight, aided by the force of the current, turns the wheel. Such wheels have been made 100 feet in diameter." — Avery, 1895

Overshot wheel

"In the overshot wheel, the water falls into buckets at the top, and by its weight, aided by the force…