The 1763-1788 American Revolution Places ClipArt gallery provides 301 illustrations of the Apollo Room, Carpenter's Hall, Concord, Faneuil Hall, Mount Vernon, the Old South Meeting House, and other locations associated with the American War for Independence.

"Battle ground at Concord. This view, looking southeast, is from the road leading to the village, by the way of the North Bridge, to the residence of Mr. Prescott Barrett. The point from which the sketch was made is upon an elevation a little north of that where the militia assembled under Colonel Barrett. The stream of water is the Concord, or Sudbury River. The site of the North Bridge is at the monument seen in the center of the picture. The monument stands upon the spot where the British were stationed, and in the plain, directly across the river from the monument, is the place where Davis and Hosmer, of the American militia, were killed. The house, the roof and gable of which are seen in the distance, just on the left of the largest tree, was the residence of the Reverend Dr. Ripley (afterward a chaplain in the army) at the time of the skirmish. It is upon the road elading to Concord village, which lies nearly half a mile beyond."—Lossing, 1851

Battleground at Concord

"Battle ground at Concord. This view, looking southeast, is from the road leading to the village, by…

"Congress Hall."—Lossing, 1851

Congress Hall

"Congress Hall."—Lossing, 1851

"The Congress House. This view is from Baltimore Street, looking southeast. The ront on the left is on Baltimore Street; the other is on Liberty Street. Its first story is now used for commercial purposes; otherwise it exhibits the same external appearances as when Congress assembled there."—Lossing, 1851

Congress House

"The Congress House. This view is from Baltimore Street, looking southeast. The ront on the left is…

The Constitution House, Kingston. This house, the property and residence of James W. Baldwin, Esq., was used for the session of the state Convention in 1777. It is built of blue limestone, and stands on the southwest corner of Maiden Lane and Fair Street. It is one of the few houses that survived the conflagration of the village.

Constitution House

The Constitution House, Kingston. This house, the property and residence of James W. Baldwin, Esq.,…

"Cornwallis' Cave, the excavation in the marl bluff."—Lossing, 1851

Cornwallis' Cave

"Cornwallis' Cave, the excavation in the marl bluff."—Lossing, 1851

"Cornwallis' head-quarters."—Lossing, 1851

Cornwallis' Head-quarters

"Cornwallis' head-quarters."—Lossing, 1851

"View from the site of Fort Cornwallis. Fort Cornwallis occupied the ground in the rear of the Episcopal church, now a grave-yard. This view is from within the inclosure, looking northeast, and includes a portion of Schultz's bridge, the Savannah River, and Hamburg upon the opposite bank. In the foreground is seen portions of the church-yard wall, and upon the brink of the river below are [African Americans] employed in placing bales of cotton upon the wharves for transportation to the sea-coast. The wharves are two stories in height, one to be used at low water, the other when the river is 'up.' There were remains of the ditch and embankments of the fort within the grave-yard when I was there; and the trench leading to the water-gate, where the 'Pride-of-India tree is seen, was very visible."—Lossing, 1851

Fort Cornwallis

"View from the site of Fort Cornwallis. Fort Cornwallis occupied the ground in the rear of the Episcopal…

"Cortelyou's House. This house, built of stone, with a brick gable from eaves to peak, is yet (1852) standing upon the eastern side of the road leading from Brooklyn to Gowanus Creek, looking southeast. In the extreme distance is seen the 'Yellow Mill' between which and the one in the foreground so many of the patriots perished."—Lossing, 1851

Cortelyou's House

"Cortelyou's House. This house, built of stone, with a brick gable from eaves to peak, is yet (1852)…

"Scene at the Cowpens. This name is derived from the cirumstance that, some years prior to the Revolution, before this section of country was settled, some persons in Camden (then called Pine-tree) employed two men to go up to the Thicketty Mountain, and in the grassy intervales among the hills, raise cattle. As a compensation, they were allowed the entire use of the cows during the summer for making butter and cheese, and the steers for tilling labor. In the fall, large numbers of the fattest cattle would be driven down to Camden to be slaughtered for beef, on account of the owners. This region, so favorable for rearing cows, on account of the grass and fine springs, was consequently called <em>The Cowpens</em>. The field was covered with blasted pines, stumps, and stocks of indian corn, and had a most dreary appearance."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Cowpens

"Scene at the Cowpens. This name is derived from the cirumstance that, some years prior to the Revolution,…

Crown Point.

Crown Point

Crown Point.

The house of Lydia Darrah (1728-1789). Lydia was a midwife and Philadelphia's first female undertaker. When British troops occupied Philadelphia in 1777, General William Howe took up residence across the street from the Darrah home. Lydia regularly collected information by eavesdropping and sent this information in code to the Continental Army.

Lydia Darrah's House

The house of Lydia Darrah (1728-1789). Lydia was a midwife and Philadelphia's first female undertaker.…

The garden house in which Jefferson and others celebrated the passage of the Declaration of Independence.

Garden House in Which Jefferson Celebrated the Passage of the Declaration

The garden house in which Jefferson and others celebrated the passage of the Declaration of Independence.

The table and chair used at the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

Table and Chair Used at the Signing of the Declaration of Independence

The table and chair used at the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

"The dining-hall, or room with seven doors. In the December number of the New York Mirror for 1834, is an interesting account of this old building, by Gulian C. Verplanck, Esq. He relates the following anecdote connected with this room, which he received from Colonel Nicholas Fish, father of the late governor of the State of New York. Just before La Fayette's death, himself and the American minister, with several of his countrymen, were invited to dine at the house of that distinguished Frenchman, Marbois, who was the French secretary of legation here during the Revolution. At the supper hour the company were shown into a room which contrasted quite oddly with the Parisian elegance of the other apartments where they had spent the evening. A low boarded, painted ceiling, with large beams, a single small, uncurtained window, with numerous small doors, as well as the general style of the whole, gave, at first, the idea of the kitchen, or largest room of a dutch or Belgian farm-house. On a long rough table was a repast, just as little in keeping with the refined kitchens of Paris as the room was with its architecture. It consisted of a large dish of meat, uncouth-looking pastry, and wine in decanters and bottles, accompanied by glasses and silver mugs, such as indicated other habits and tastes than those of modern Paris."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Dining-Hall

"The dining-hall, or room with seven doors. In the December number of the New York Mirror for 1834,…

"Eutaw Spring, where there was a conflict during the American Revolution."—Lossing, 1851

Eutaw Spring

"Eutaw Spring, where there was a conflict during the American Revolution."—Lossing, 1851

"Mrs. Falls'. This house, now (1850) owned by Mr. Samuel Moore, is a frame building, and stands on the right side of the New Windsor road, at the southeastern angle of 'The Square.' It is surrounded by locust and large balm-of-Gilead trees. There Major Armstrong wrote the famous <em>Newburgh Addresses</em>, and there those in the secret held their private conferences."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Mrs. Falls'

"Mrs. Falls'. This house, now (1850) owned by Mr. Samuel Moore, is a frame building, and stands on the…

"Faneuil Hall has been denominated 'the cradle of American liberty,' having been the popular gathering-place of the Sons of Liberty during the incipient stages of the Revolution. It was erected in 1742, at the sole expense of Peter Faneuil, Esq., of Boston, and by him generously given to the town-the basement for a market, with a spacious and most beautiful hall, and other convenient rooms above, for public meetings of the citizens. It was burned in 1761, nothing but the brick walls remaining. The town immediately ordered it to be rebuilt. Mr. Faneuil had then been dead several years. The engraving shows it as it appeared during the Revolution. It was enlarged in 1805, by the addition of another story, and an increase of forty feet in its width. The hall is about eighty feet square, and contains some fine paintings of distinguished men. The lower part is no longer used as a market. From the cupola is obtained a fine view of the city and harbor. The original vane still turns upon the pinnacle. It is in the form of a huge grasshopper, an emblem of devouring, and significant of the original occupation of the basement story."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Faneuil Hall

"Faneuil Hall has been denominated 'the cradle of American liberty,' having been the popular gathering-place…

Faneuil Hall, 1763.

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall, 1763.

Faneuil Hall in Boston.

Faneuil Hall

Faneuil Hall in Boston.

Site of the first interview between Gates and Burgoyne. This view is taken from the turnpike, looking south. The old road was where the canal now is, and the place of meeting was about at the point where the bridge is seen.

first interview

Site of the first interview between Gates and Burgoyne. This view is taken from the turnpike, looking…

First meeting hall. This picture of the first house for Christian worship erected in Connecticut is copied from Barber's <em>Historical Collections</em>.

First Meeting House

First meeting hall. This picture of the first house for Christian worship erected in Connecticut is…

Fitch's Point, the landing-place of the British. This view is from the west side of Gregory's Point, looking north-northwest. The promontory toward the left, covered with dark trees, is called Fort Point. There was an Indian fortification when the first settlers arrived at Norwalk. Further to the left, on the extreme edge of the picture, is seen one end of the rail-road bridge, which crosses Norwalk River. The New York and New Haven Rail-road was then in progress of construction. The point derives its name from its former proprietor, Governor Thomas Fitch, whose residence was Norwalk. He was Governor of the colony of Connecticut, and his name is among the beloved of his generation. He died July 18th, 1774, in the seventy-fifth year of his age.

Fitch's Point

Fitch's Point, the landing-place of the British. This view is from the west side of Gregory's Point,…

Site of Fort Anne. This view is from the bridge which crosses Wood Creek, looking south. The distant building on the right is the dwelling of Mr. Moore. Nearer is his store-house, and on the left are his out-houses. The fence, and so on to the barns and in their yards.

Fort Anne

Site of Fort Anne. This view is from the bridge which crosses Wood Creek, looking south. The distant…

Fort at Chambly, this is a view of the south and west sides of the fort, looking toward the river. It stands directly upon the Richelieu, at the foot of the Chambly Rapids, and at the head of the navigation of the river up from the St. awrence. it is strongly built of stone, and, as seen in the picture, is in a state of excellent preservation.

Fort at Chambly

Fort at Chambly, this is a view of the south and west sides of the fort, looking toward the river. It…

Fort Chambly at the foot of the Chambly rapids on the Richelieu River in Quebec, Canada, was built by the French in 1711.

Fort Chambly

Fort Chambly at the foot of the Chambly rapids on the Richelieu River in Quebec, Canada, was built by…

Mouth of Fort Edward Creek.

Fort Edward Creek

Mouth of Fort Edward Creek.

Fort Johnson

Fort Johnson

Fort Johnson

Fort Miller fording-place. This was the crossing-place for the armies; and there are still to be seen some of the logs and stones upon the shore which formed a part of the old 'King's Road' leading to the fording-place.

Fort Miller

Fort Miller fording-place. This was the crossing-place for the armies; and there are still to be seen…

"View near Fort Montgomery. This view is from an eminence near the mountain road, about three quarters of a mile in the rear of Fort Montgomery. In the distance, the cultivated slopes of West Chester, between Peekskill and Verplanck's Point, are seen. On the left is the high, rocky promontory called Anthony's Nose; on the right is the Dunderberg, with a portion of Beveridge's Island; the buildings in the center of the picture, owned by Mrs. Pelham, denote the site of Fort Clinton; toward the right is seen the deep ravine through which flows Poplopen's Creek, and on the extreme right, partly hidden by the tree in the foreground, and fronting the river, is the site of Fort Montgomery. The scenery from this point of view is indeed magnificent."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Montgomery

"View near Fort Montgomery. This view is from an eminence near the mountain road, about three quarters…

Distant view of Fort Niagra. This view is from the west side of the Niagra River, near the light-house. The fort is on the east side (right side of the picture), at the mouth of the river. The steam-boat seen in the distance is out on Lake Ontario.

Fort Niagra

Distant view of Fort Niagra. This view is from the west side of the Niagra River, near the light-house.…

View of Oswego and the Fort in 1798. This view is from the west side of the river, near the site of the present United States Hotel.

Fort Oswego

View of Oswego and the Fort in 1798. This view is from the west side of the river, near the site of…

Fort Plain block-house. There is considerable confusion in the accounts concerning Fort Plain, for which there is no necessity. There was a stockade about two miles southwest of Fort Plain, called Fort Clyde, in honor of Colonel Clyde, an officer in the Tryon county militia; and another about the same distance northwest, called Fort Plank, or Blank, from the circumstance that it stood upon land owned by Frederic Blank. The latter and Fort Plain have been confounded. Mr. Stone erroneously considered them as one, and says, in his <em>Life of Brant</em> (ii., 95), "The principal work of defense, then called Fort Plank, and subsequently Fort Plain, was situated upon an elevated plain overlooking the valley, near the site of the village still retaining the name of the fortress." Other writers have regarded the block-house as the fort, when, in fact, it was only a part of the fotifications. The drawing here given is from one published in Stone's Life of Brant, with a description from the Fort Plain Journal of December 26th, 1837. Mr. Lipe considered it a correct view, except the lower story, which, it was his impression, was square instead of octagonal, and had four port-holes for heavy ordinance.

Fort Plain

Fort Plain block-house. There is considerable confusion in the accounts concerning Fort Plain, for which…

Site of Fort Stanwix.

Fort Stanwix

Site of Fort Stanwix.

House in which General Fraser died.

Fraser House

House in which General Fraser died.

In August of 1775, Americans took possession of cannons from the Battery at the tip of Manhattan and exchanged fire with the HMS Asia (1764). They retaliated by firing a 32-gun broadside on the city, sending a cannon ball through the roof of Fraunces Tavern. When the victorious Americans re-occupied the city, it was Fraunces Tavern that hosted Washington and his officers in a victory banquet. On Dec. 4, 1783, Washington was again at Fraunces Tavern to say farewell to his officers in the Long Room. Saving America from the fate of many republics that turned quickly to military dictatorship, Washington resigned his post and returned to civilian life until chosen first President of the United States.

Fraunces Tavern

In August of 1775, Americans took possession of cannons from the Battery at the tip of Manhattan and…

The Fraunces' Tavern in 1783. It was originally the home for Oliver de Lancey who sold it to Samuel Fraunces. The tavern was used for Revolutionary War meetings, but the British damaged it in 1775.

Fraunces' Tavern

The Fraunces' Tavern in 1783. It was originally the home for Oliver de Lancey who sold it to Samuel…

"Ruins of Oglethorpe's Barracks at Frederica. This is from a sketch made by W. W. Hazzard, Esq., in 1851. Mr. Hazzard writes: 'These ruins stand on the left bank or bluff of the south branch of the Alatamaha River, on the west side of St. Simon's Island, where the steamers pass from Savannah to Florida.' This fort was a scene of hostilities during the war of the Revolution, and also that of 1812; and is one of the most interesting military relics of our country. Mr. Hazzard states that, in his field in the rear of it, his men always turn up 'bomb-shells and hollow shot whenever they plow there.' The whole remains are upon his plantation at West Point."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Frederica

"Ruins of Oglethorpe's Barracks at Frederica. This is from a sketch made by W. W. Hazzard, Esq., in…

"View of the remains of the French Works. These remains are in the southeastern suburbs of the city, about half way between the [African American] Cemetary and the residence of Major William Bowen, seen toward the right of the picture. The banks have an average height, from the bottom of the ditch, of about five feet, and are dotted with pines and chincapins or dwarf chestnuts, the former draped with moss. The ground is an open common, and although it was mid-winter when I was there, it was covered with green grass, bespangled with myriads of little flowers of stellar form. This view is from the direction of the town looking southeast."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

French Works

"View of the remains of the French Works. These remains are in the southeastern suburbs of the city,…

"Friends' meeting-house. This view is from the shed in the yard, looking southeast. The building stands in the center of a large square, if of imported brick, and very spacious. The Quakers were numerous in this vicinity in the time of the Revolution, and a large number of the present inhabitants are members of that sect."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Friends' meeting-house

"Friends' meeting-house. This view is from the shed in the yard, looking southeast. The building stands…

"Gaspee Point. This view is from the bank of the cove just below the Point, looking northeast, showing its appearance at low water when the clam-fishers are upon it. The buoy is seen beyond the extreme end of the Point on the right. The bank is about fifteen feet high. In front of Pawtuxet, about a mile above, are the remains of breast-works, thrown up during the war of 1812. There are also breast-works at Field's Point, two miles below Providence, where is a flag-staff. There is the quarantine ground."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Gaspee Point

"Gaspee Point. This view is from the bank of the cove just below the Point, looking northeast, showing…

General Gate's headquarters at Saratoga.

Gate's Headquarters

General Gate's headquarters at Saratoga.

"Fort George, from the water front of the present Castle Garden."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort George

"Fort George, from the water front of the present Castle Garden."—Lossing, 1851

"View at Fort Granby."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Granby

"View at Fort Granby."—Lossing, 1851

"View at Gravesend Bay. This view is from the road on the high shore, a little below Fort Hamilton, looking southeast; the house in the center belonged to Simon Cortelyou, a Tory, during the Revolution, and has not been altered. Gravesend Bay is seen beyond the house, and the distant land is Coney Island beach."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Gravesend Bay

"View at Gravesend Bay. This view is from the road on the high shore, a little below Fort Hamilton,…

"Head-quarters of Greene and Knox. This view is from the turnpike road, looking southeast. The water in front is a mill-pond over the dam of which passes a foot-bridge. The mill is hidden by the trees in the ravine below. This side was originally the rear of the house, the old Goshen road passing upon the other side. The old front is a story and a half high. Captain Morton, the proprietor, is a son of the late General Jacob Morton, of New York city."—Lossing, 1851

Greene and Knox Head-Quarters

"Head-quarters of Greene and Knox. This view is from the turnpike road, looking southeast. The water…

Nathanael Greene was a major general of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War. Here he is crossing the River Dan.

General Nathanael Greene Crossing the River Dan

Nathanael Greene was a major general of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War. Here…

Grummon's Hill.

Grummon's Hill

Grummon's Hill.

"View of the battle-ground. This view is from the eminence southwest of the site of old Guilford Court House, near the junction of the roads running one north to Bruce's Cross-roads, the other west to Salem. The log-house, partially clapboarded, seen on the right, was uninhabited. It stands near the woods which intervene between Martinsville and the plantation of Mr. Hotchkiss. In the distance, near the center, is seen Martinsville, and between it and the foreground is the rolling vale, its undulations furrowed by many gulleys. In an open field, on the left of the road, seen in the hollow toward the left of the picture, was the fiercest part of the battle, where Washington charged upon the guards. Upon the ridge extending to the right through the center of the picture, the second line (Virginians) was posted. The fence running to the right from Martinsville, down into the valley on the right, denotes the Salisbury road. The snow was falling very fast when I made this sketch, and distant objects were seen with great difficulty. Our point of view, at the old loghouse, is the extreme westerly boundary of the field of controversy."—Lossing, 1851

Guilford Battle-ground

"View of the battle-ground. This view is from the eminence southwest of the site of old Guilford Court…

The site of the Guilford Courthouse battle, a pivotal battle of the American Revolution. This battle impelled the British general to take the road that would soon lead him to defeat.

Guilford Courthouse

The site of the Guilford Courthouse battle, a pivotal battle of the American Revolution. This battle…

The Battle of Guilford Court House was a battle fought on March 15, 1781 inside the present-day city of Greensboro, North Carolina, during the American Revolutionary War.

The Battlefield of Guilford

The Battle of Guilford Court House was a battle fought on March 15, 1781 inside the present-day city…

"View at Gum Swamp. This view is from the south side of the stream."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Gum Swamp

"View at Gum Swamp. This view is from the south side of the stream."—Lossing, 1851

This was the residence of Colonel Guy Johnson, and is still standing, on the north side of the Mohawk, about a mile from the village of Amsterdam, in Montgomery county. It is substantially built of stone, and may stand a century yet. Embowered in trees, it is a beautiful summer residence.

Guy Park

This was the residence of Colonel Guy Johnson, and is still standing, on the north side of the Mohawk,…

"Hancock's House, Boston. This is a substantial stone building, situated upon Beacon Street, fronting the Common. It was erected by Thomas Hancock, an uncle of Governor Hancock, in 1737. The present proprietor is a nephew of the governor."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hancock's House

"Hancock's House, Boston. This is a substantial stone building, situated upon Beacon Street, fronting…

Hanover County Courthouse is the place where Patrick Henry practiced law and argued the case accusing King George III of tyranny in overturning colonial law without regard to the wishes of his subjects.

Hanover Courthouse

Hanover County Courthouse is the place where Patrick Henry practiced law and argued the case accusing…

"Harlem Plains, from a roof on Mount Morris."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Harlem Plains

"Harlem Plains, from a roof on Mount Morris."—Lossing, 1851

General Herkimer's Residence.

Herkimer's residence

General Herkimer's Residence.

"View at the Spring; Hobkirk's Hill. It is at the hed of a ravine, scooped out of the northeastern slope of Hobkirk's Hill. The noble trees which shadow it are tulips, poplars, and pines. The house seen on the top of the hill, toward the left, is the residence of William E. Johnson, Esq., president of the Camden Bank. A few yards below the spring a dike has been cast up, across the ravine, by which a fine duck pond is formed, and adds beauty to the scene, in summer."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hobkirk's Hill

"View at the Spring; Hobkirk's Hill. It is at the hed of a ravine, scooped out of the northeastern slope…

"The Hopper House. This view is from the road, looking northeast. The low part, on the left, is a portion of the old mansion of the Revolution, which contained the dining-hall. It was a long stone building. A part of it has been taken down, and the present more spacious edifice, of brick, was erected soon after the war."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hopper House

"The Hopper House. This view is from the road, looking northeast. The low part, on the left, is a portion…

"Howe's head-quarters."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Howe's Head-Quarters

"Howe's head-quarters."—Lossing, 1851

"When Howe reached that place he found General Sullivan confronting him, and the fishermen of Marblehead, under Colonel Glover; but the British greatly outnumbered the Americans, and Howe was able to push inland to the hills south of New Rochelle. The country was thickly covered with woods; but Howe found a small house in which he established his head-quarters."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Howe's Headquarters

"When Howe reached that place he found General Sullivan confronting him, and the fishermen of Marblehead,…