The 1763-1788 American Revolution Places ClipArt gallery provides 301 illustrations of the Apollo Room, Carpenter's Hall, Concord, Faneuil Hall, Mount Vernon, the Old South Meeting House, and other locations associated with the American War for Independence.

Remains of "New Fort," at Oswego.

New Fort

Remains of "New Fort," at Oswego.

"New London Harbor, looking north. This little sketch shows the relative position of the forts. Fort Trumbull is seen on the left of the picture, and Fort Griswold, with the Groton Monument, is on the extreme right."—Lossing, 1851

New London Harbor

"New London Harbor, looking north. This little sketch shows the relative position of the forts. Fort…

The old courthouse in New London, Connecticut.

The Old Courthouse of New London

The old courthouse in New London, Connecticut.

The interior of a room of General Washington's headquarters in Newburgh, New York.

Interior of Washington's Headquarters at Newburgh

The interior of a room of General Washington's headquarters in Newburgh, New York.

"Old tower at Newport."—Lossing, 1851

Newport Tower

"Old tower at Newport."—Lossing, 1851

"Old City Tavern. This is a frame building, and stands on the northwest corner of Main and Nineteenth streets. A portion of the lower part is yet inhabited (1852). The glass and some of the sashes in the upper story are gone, and the roof is partly decayed and fallen in on the west end. Here Cornwallis and other British officers were quartered at a later period, and beneath its roof the good Washington was once sheltered."—Lossing, 1851

Old City Tavern

"Old City Tavern. This is a frame building, and stands on the northwest corner of Main and Nineteenth…

Old Parsonage and Church. This view is from the high plain on the right of the block-house, looking north. The building upon the hill across the ravine is the old parsonage, which was immediately built upon the ruins of the one that was burned. On the left I have placed a church in its proper relative position to the parsonage, as indicated by Mr. Lipe. It was about half a mile northwest of the fort. On the right are seen the Mohawk River and Plain, a train of cars in the distance, and the hills that bound the view on the north side of the Mohawk Valley, in the direction of Stone Arabia and Klock's Field, where two battles were fought in 1780. These will be hereafter noticed.

Old Parsonage and Church

Old Parsonage and Church. This view is from the high plain on the right of the block-house, looking…

"The Old South. This venerable and venerated edifice, that stood through all the storms of the Revolution, and yet remains, stands on the corner of Washington and Milk Streets. It is of brick, and was erected in 1729-30, upon the site of an edifice built by the Pedo-baptists in 1669. The ancient church was of cedar, two stories high, with a steeple, gallery, and pews. The 'Old South' was the famous gathering-place of the people during the excitements of 1773. The British troops occupied it as a circus for the drill of cavalry in 1775, after removing all the wood-work within, except the eastern gallery and the pulpit and sounding-board. The British officers felt no compunctions in thus desecrating a Presbyterian chapel. It was repaired in 1782, and remains a fine model of our early church architecture. This view is from Washington Street."—Lossing, 1851

Old South

"The Old South. This venerable and venerated edifice, that stood through all the storms of the Revolution,…

The Old South Meeting House in Boston, Mass. gained fame as the organizing point for the Boston Tea Party in 1773.

Old South Meeting House

The Old South Meeting House in Boston, Mass. gained fame as the organizing point for the Boston Tea…

The battle-ground of Oriskany. This sketch was made from the eastern side of the ravine, looking west. The marsh in the bottom of the ravine, mentioned in the text, is partially drained by a rivulet. When I visited the spot (August, 1848), many logs of the old causeway were still visible, and afforded a crossing-place for cattle. These logs are seen in the picture. The road on the left is the present highway between Oriskany and Rome. The barn stands upon the road southeasterly, the ambush was placed. The hottest of the battle occurred upon the high plain between the ravine is the foreground and another beyond the most distant trees in the picture. The hills seen in the xtreme distance, on the right, are those upon the north side of the Mohawk. The frame-work in the ravine is the remains of the scaffolding erected for the speakers at the celebration alluded to, in 1844.

Oriskany

The battle-ground of Oriskany. This sketch was made from the eastern side of the ravine, looking west.…

Oswego in 1755. This view is looking north toward the lake. It is a reduced copy of the frontispiece to <em>Smith's History of New York</em>, first ediction, London, 1757, and represents the encampment of Shirley there at that time.

Oswego

Oswego in 1755. This view is looking north toward the lake. It is a reduced copy of the frontispiece…

View of Oswego Harbor, 1848. This view is from the top of the United States Hotel, looking east-northeast. It was hastily sketched during the approach of a thunder-storm, and the "huge herald drops" came down just as I traced the distant water-line of the lake. The objects by the figure in the foreground are the balustrade and chimney of the hotel, now (1848) a summer boarding-house for strangers. The first height beyond the water on the right is the point on which stands Fort Oswego. The land in the far distance, on the same side, is Four-mile point, behind which Montcalm landed his forces. On the left is seen the light-house upon one of the stone piers, and beyond it spread out the waters of Lake Ontario.

Oswego Harbor

View of Oswego Harbor, 1848. This view is from the top of the United States Hotel, looking east-northeast.…

"View from Peekskill Landing. This view is from Peekskill landing, looking up the river. On the left is the Dunderberg, or Thunder Mountain, over which the troops marched to Forts Clinton and Montgomery. The dark spot on the brink of the river, upon the extreme left, shows the place of the coffer-dam made by the deluded seekers after Captain Kidd's treasure. At the water's edge, on the right, is seen the grading of the Hudson River railroad, in course of construction when the sketch was made. The dark mountain on the right is Anthony's Nose. Intermediately, and projecting far into the river, is a high, sandy bluff, on which stood Fort Independence. Further on is Beveridge's Island; and in the extreme distance, behind the flag-staff, is seen Bear Mountain. Between the point of Fort Independence and the rock cutting of the railroad is the mouth of Peek's Kill, or Peek's Creek."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Peekskill Landing

"View from Peekskill Landing. This view is from Peekskill landing, looking up the river. On the left…

"Penn's House. This view is from Second Street. The building is of imported brick, except the modern addition between the wings, which is now occupied as a clothing store by an Israelite. The house is suffered to decay, and doubtless the broom of improvement will soon sweep it away, as a cumberer of valuable ground."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Penn's House

"Penn's House. This view is from Second Street. The building is of imported brick, except the modern…

"Remains of fortifications at Plum Point. This view is from the interior of the redoubt looking eastward upon the river. In the distance is seen Pollopel's Island, near the upper entrance to the Highlands, beyond which rise the lofty Beacon Hills, whereon alarm-fires often gleamed during the war."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Plum Point

"Remains of fortifications at Plum Point. This view is from the interior of the redoubt looking eastward…

View of Point Levi from Durham Terrace, Quebec. This sketch is taken from Durham Terrace, near the north wall of the Castle Garden. In the foreground are the tops of the houses below in Champlain, Notre Dame, and St. Peter's Streets, and in the distance, across the St. Lawrence, is seen Point Levi, with its pretty little village, its church and wharves. On the extreme left, in the distance, is the upper end of the island of Orleans, which divides the channel. The point seen is the place where Wolfe erected batteries.

Point Levi

View of Point Levi from Durham Terrace, Quebec. This sketch is taken from Durham Terrace, near the north…

"Prescott's Headquarters."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Prescott's Head-Quarters

"Prescott's Headquarters."—Lossing, 1851

"Prescott's Headquarters. This house is on the east side of the west road, about a mile from the bay. The view is from the road where the small stream crosses, after leaving the pond seen in the picture. It is a beautiful summer residence, the grounds around it being finely shaded by willows, elms, and sycamores. The present occupant kindly showed me the room in which Prescott was lying at the time of his capture. It is on the second floor, at the southwest corner of the house, or on the right as seen in the engraving. It is a well-built frame house, and was probably then the most spacious mansion on the island out of Newport."—Lossing, 1851

Prescott's Headquarters

"Prescott's Headquarters. This house is on the east side of the west road, about a mile from the bay.…

"View of the battle-ground near Princeton. This view, looking north, is from the carriage gate of Mr. John Clarke, owner of the house in which General Mercer died, which is situated about seventy rods from the Trenton turnpike. That dwelling is represented in the foreground of the picture, on the extreme right. The distant view includes almost the whole field of action. Near the center of the picture, over the head of the dark figure, is seen the house of William Clark, and his out-buildings. The barn, a little more to the left, with a tree in front, is upon the spot from whence Mercer rushed forward to the hedge-fence. That fence was upon the line of the present turnpike, denoted in the sketch by the fence passing down the slope beyond the large tree on the extreme left. The 'high ground' for which both parties were aiming, to secure advantage, is seen in the extreme distance. The dark spot between the tree in the second field and the barn denotes the spot where Mercer fell. The house of William Clark, in the distance, is about a quarter of a mile from the one in the foreground, where Mercer died. The hollow between the two houses was the space between the belligerents when Washington advanced to the support of Mercer. The place of conflict is about a mile and a quarter south of Princeton. The turnpike passes directly through it."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Princeton battle-ground

"View of the battle-ground near Princeton. This view, looking north, is from the carriage gate of Mr.…

"The Walnut Street Prison. This edifice was erected in 1774, and taken down in 1836. The beautiful new Athenaeum occupies a portion of the ground on Sixth Street, and the remainder is covered by elegant dwellings. It is a singular fact that the architect who constructed it was the first person incarcerated in it. He was a Whig, and, having incurred the displeasure of the British, he was locked up in that prison. The <em>Public Ledger</em> of June 26th, 1837, gives an account of an armorial drawing, representing, in bold relief, a cuirass, casque, gorget, and Roman battle-ax, with radiating spears, which was made upon an arch of one of the second story cells, by Marshall, an English engraver, who was confined there for many years for counterfeiting the notes of the United States Bank. He was the son of the notorious 'Bag and Hatchet Woman,' of St. Giles's, London, who followed the British army in its Continental campaigns, and gathered spoils from the slain and wounded on the field of battle. Those who were dead, were readily plundered, and the wounded as readily dispatched. This woman and son were master-spirits in the purlieus of St. Giles's, among robbers and counterfeiters. The gang were at length betrayed, and the parent and child fled to this country, bringing with them considerable wealth in money and jewels. They lived in splendid style in Philadelphia, riding in a gorgeous cream-colored phaeton, drawn by richly-caparisoned horses, driven tandem. Their means were soon exhausted, when the son married, and commenced business as an engraver. He counterfeited notes of the United States Bank, was detected, and in 1803 was sentenced to eighteen years' confinement and hard labor in the Walnut Street Prison, then the State Penitentiary. While he was in prison, his mother, who had wondered away from Philadelphia in poverty and destitution, was executed in another state for a foul murder and arson."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Prison

"The Walnut Street Prison. This edifice was erected in 1774, and taken down in 1836. The beautiful new…

"Old Tavern in Providence. This view is from the market, looking north. The building stands on the east side of the square and parallel with its front commences North Main Street. In the yard on the right is venerable horse-chestnut tree, standing between the house and the Roger Williams' Bank. In former times, a balcony extended across the front. The door that opend upon it is still there, but the balcony is gone. The roof is completely overgrown with moss, and every appearance of age marks it."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Providence Tavern

"Old Tavern in Providence. This view is from the market, looking north. The building stands on the east…

"The Province House. The Province House, the residence of the colonial governors, is still standing, in the rear of stores on Washington Street, oppposite Milk Street. It is a large brick building, three stories high, and was formerly decorated with the king's arms richly carved and gilt. A cupola surmounted the roof. In front of the house was a pretty lawn with an iron fence, and on each side of the gate was a large oak-tree. The ground sloped, and in front were about twenty stone steps. Its grounds are now covered with buildings, and the house can not be seen without entering Province Court. The king's arms are in the cabinet of the Massachusetts Historical Society."—Lossing, 1851

Province House

"The Province House. The Province House, the residence of the colonial governors, is still standing,…

The New Jail was made a Provost Prison during the Revolutionary War and here officers and men of note were confined.

Provost Jail

The New Jail was made a Provost Prison during the Revolutionary War and here officers and men of note…

Putnam's Hill.

Putnam's Hill

Putnam's Hill.

General Putnam's land office at Marietta during the American Revolution.

General Putnam's Land Office at Marietta

General Putnam's land office at Marietta during the American Revolution.

Putnam's quarters.

Putnam's Quarters

Putnam's quarters.

View at Putnam's Rock.

Putnam's Rock

View at Putnam's Rock.

"Interior of Fort Putnam. This little sketch is a view of the remains of the casemates, or vaults, of Fort Putnam. There were nine originally, but only six remain in a state of fair preservation. They were built of brick and covered with stone; were twelve feet wide and eighteen feet deep, with an arched roof twelve feet high. Each one had a fire-place, and they seem to have been used for the purposes of barracks, batteries, and magazines. In the center of the fort is a spring, that bubbles up in a rocky basin. The whole interior is very rough, it being the pinnacle of a bald, rocky elevation."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Putnam

"Interior of Fort Putnam. This little sketch is a view of the remains of the casemates, or vaults, of…

"Pyle's Pond. About a quarter of a mile northwest from this pond, is the spot where the battle occurred. It was then heavily wooded; now it is a cleared field, on the plantation of Colonel Michael Holt. Mr. Holt planted an apple-tree upon the spot where fourteen of the slain were buried in one grave. Near by, a persimmon-tree indicates the place of burial of several others."—Lossing, 1851

Pyle's Pond

"Pyle's Pond. About a quarter of a mile northwest from this pond, is the spot where the battle occurred.…

The view of Quaker Hill from the fort on Butt's Hill.

Quaker Hill

The view of Quaker Hill from the fort on Butt's Hill.

The view of Quaker Hill northward from Butt's Hill.

View of Quaker Hill from Butt's Hill

The view of Quaker Hill northward from Butt's Hill.

"Raleigh Tavern. When I visited Williamsburg in December, 1848, the front part of the old Raleigh tavern had been torn down, and a building in modern style was erected in its place. The old tavern was in the form of an L, one portion fronting the street, the other extending at right angles, in the rear. Both parts were precisely alike in external appearance, and as the rear building was yet standing and unaltered. I am able to give a restored view of the Raleigh, as it appeared during the Revolution. The wooden bust of Sir Walter Raleigh, which graved the front of the old inn, now ornaments the new building."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Raleigh Tavern

"Raleigh Tavern. When I visited Williamsburg in December, 1848, the front part of the old Raleigh tavern…

Johann Gottlieb Rall (ca. 1726 - December 26, 1776 ) was a German colonel in command of Hessian troops in Trenton, New Jersey. By 1776, Rall belonged to the infantry regiment of the 1st Division under General Phillip Leopold von Heister and commanded approximately 1,200 men fighting for Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War. He was at the Battle of Brooklyn at Flatbush, the Battle of White Plains, the Battle of Long Island, and figured prominently in the Battle of Trenton. At the Battle of Trenton, Rall was mortally wounded and taken back to his headquarters where he died.

<p>"Rall's head-quarters. This is a frame building standing upon Warren Street, opposite Perry, near the corner of Bank Alley. The buildings on the left are also of ante-Revolutionary origin. This house was a tavern at the time, kept by Stacey Potts, the grandfather of Stacey G. and Joseph C. Potts, Esqrs., of Trenton. In a pane of glass, in the front window on the left of the front door, lower story, may be seen a hole made by a bullet, shot during the battle. Colonel Rall died in the front room in the second story, immediately over this window. It is related that a daughter of Mr. Potts, who was at a neighbor's when the firing commenced, was running toward her father's house, when a musket-ball struck her comb from her head and slightly injured her scalp."—Lossing, 1851

Rall's Headquarters

Johann Gottlieb Rall (ca. 1726 - December 26, 1776 ) was a German colonel in command of Hessian troops…

"Remains of intrenchments the Ramapo Pass. This view is from the road, looking north toward the village of Ramapo. The remains of the intrenchments are seen along the right in the foreground. On the left, in the distance, is seen a glimpse of the hills on the other side of the narrow valley."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Ramapo Pass

"Remains of intrenchments the Ramapo Pass. This view is from the road, looking north toward the village…

The Red House. The "Red House" is situated upon the street in Wilkesbarre next the river, and about seventy-five rods below the bridge. It is the place where John Franklin was arrested. On his return from a political tour down the valley, he came up by the way of Hanover to Wilkesbarre. While standing near the ferry, an acquaintance came up to him and said, "A friend at the Red House wishes to speak to you." Franklin walked to the house, where a person caught him from behind, and attempted to pinion his hands. He was a powerful man, and shook off his captors; but, a noose being thrown over his head, he was secured. They then attempted to get him on horseback, when he cried out, "Help, help! William Slocum! where is William Slocum?" and, drawing his pistols, discharged one, but without effect. He was felled by a blow, and laid almost senseless. It was seeding time, and nearly all the men were in the fields. But the Yankee blood of Mrs. Slocum (the mother of the "lost sister") was up, and, seizing a gun, she ran to the door, exclaiming, "William! Who will call William? Is there no man here? Will nobody rescue him?" Colonel Pickering's dwelling was near the "Red House." It is still standing, but so modernized that its original character is lost.

Red House

The Red House. The "Red House" is situated upon the street in Wilkesbarre next the river, and about…

"View from the site of the Redoubt. This view is from the mounds looking northwest, up the York River. The first head-land on the right is Gloucester Point, and upon the high bank on the left is situated the village of Yorktown. The dark spot in the bank indicates the place of the so-called <em>Cornwallis' Cave</em>."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Redoubt

"View from the site of the Redoubt. This view is from the mounds looking northwest, up the York River.…

"The Regulator battle-ground. This view is from the south side of the Salisbury Road, which is marked by the fence on the left. The belligerents confronted in the open field seen on the north of the road, beyond the fence. Between the blasted pine, to which a muscadine is clinging, and the road, on the edge of a small morass, several of those who were slain in that engagement were buried. I saw the mounds of four graves by the fence, where the sheep, seen in the picture, are standing. The tree by the road side is a venerable oak, in which are a few scars produced by the bullets."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Regulator Battle-ground

"The Regulator battle-ground. This view is from the south side of the Salisbury Road, which is marked…

Cellar of the Reidesel house.

Reidesel Cellar

Cellar of the Reidesel house.

The Reidesel house, Saratoga.

Reidesel House

The Reidesel house, Saratoga.

Place of the barricade, Ridgefield. This view is at the north end of the main street. It was taken from the spot where, traditions asserts, Arnold's horse was killed, which is on the west side of the street, near a maple-tree, about one hundred yards southwest of the house of Samuel Stebbins, Esq., seen on the right in the picture. While making this sketch an old man came along, and informed me that on the day after the battle himself and some other boys skinned Arnold's horse, and discovered nine bullet-holes in his side. The escape of the rider seemed miraculous.

Ridgefield

Place of the barricade, Ridgefield. This view is at the north end of the main street. It was taken from…

"The Riedesel House, Cambridge. This is from a pencil sketch by Mr. Longfellow. I am also indebted to him for the fac-simile of the autograph of the Baroness of Riedesel. It will be perceived that the <em>i</em> is placed before the <em>e</em> in spelling the name. I have heretofore given it with the <em>e</em> first, which is according to the orthography in Burgoyne's <em>State of the Expedition</em>, wherein I supposed it was spelled correctly. This autograph shows it to be erroneous. Mr. Longfellow's beautiful poem, 'The Open Window,' refers to this mansion."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Riedesel House

"The Riedesel House, Cambridge. This is from a pencil sketch by Mr. Longfellow. I am also indebted to…

The home of Beverly Robinson, a commander of the Loyal American Regiment. He is known for his work with the British secret service during the American Revolution.

The Beverly Robinson House

The home of Beverly Robinson, a commander of the Loyal American Regiment. He is known for his work with…

"View at Rocky Mount. This view is from the garden-gate at Mrs. Barkley's, looking northeast. On the left is seen part of a store-house, and on the right, just beyond the post with a pigeon-house, is a hollow, within which are the remains of houses. At the foot of the hill may still be seen the foundations of the house mentioned in the text as having been occupied by the British when attacked by Sumter. The small log buildings across the center, occupying the slope where the conflict occurred, are servants' houses."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Rocky Mount

"View at Rocky Mount. This view is from the garden-gate at Mrs. Barkley's, looking northeast. On the…

"View at Rugeley's. This view is from the south side of the bridge. The counterfeit cannon was placed in the road where the first wagon is seen. The house and barn of Rugeley were in the cleared field seen beyond the wagons."—Lossing, 1851

Rugeley's

"View at Rugeley's. This view is from the south side of the bridge. The counterfeit cannon was placed…

Sabbath Day Point. It is between three and four miles from the little village of Hague, in the midst of the most picturesque scenery imaginable. Here, in 1756, a small provincial force, pressed by a party of French and Indians, and unable to escape across the lake, made a desperate resistance, and defeated the enemy with considerable slaughter.

Sabbath Day Point

Sabbath Day Point. It is between three and four miles from the little village of Hague, in the midst…

"View at Sander's Creek. This view is from the north side of the Creek. like the other stream, it is filled with canes, shrubs, and many blasted pines."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Sander's Creek

"View at Sander's Creek. This view is from the north side of the Creek. like the other stream, it is…

Encampments of Burgoyne's army, Saratoga and Stillwater.

Saratoga and Stillwater - Encampments of Burgoyne's Army

Encampments of Burgoyne's army, Saratoga and Stillwater.

The Sayre House in Southampton, New York which was occupied by the British during the Revolutionary War.

The Sayre House

The Sayre House in Southampton, New York which was occupied by the British during the Revolutionary…

"Place where Colonel Scammell was killed."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Scammell Killed

"Place where Colonel Scammell was killed."—Lossing, 1851

General Schuyler's Head-Quarters.

Schuyler's Head-Quarters

General Schuyler's Head-Quarters.

General Schuyler's mansion.

Schuyler's Mansion

General Schuyler's mansion.

Schuyler's Mansion. This view is from Schuyler Street. The edifice is of brick, having a closed octagonal porch or vestibule in front. It was built by Mrs. Schuyler while her husband was in England in 1760-1. The old family mansion, large and highly ornamented, in the Dutch style, stood nearly upon the site of the present City Hall, between State and Washington Streets. It was taken down in 1800.

Schuyler's Mansion

Schuyler's Mansion. This view is from Schuyler Street. The edifice is of brick, having a closed octagonal…

Shuyler's Mills, Saratoga.

Schuyler's Mills

Shuyler's Mills, Saratoga.

View from Shole's Landing. This is a view from Chipman's Point, or Sholes's Landing, looking north. The high ridge on the right, in the distance, is Mount Independence. The higher and more distant hill on the left, over the cedar, is Mount Defiance, and the elevation beyond is Mount Hope. Fort Ticonderoga is on the other side of Mount Independence, in a line with the highest part.

Sholes's Landing

View from Shole's Landing. This is a view from Chipman's Point, or Sholes's Landing, looking north.…

"Lake Sinnipink, or Bloody Pond. This view is from the outlet of the lake, within a few rods of the spot where a large number of the Americans and British were slain in a preliminary skirmish on the afternoon when the forts were taken. The bodies were thrown into the lake, and from that circumstance it was afterward called Bloody Pond."—Lossing, 1851

Lake Sinnipink

"Lake Sinnipink, or Bloody Pond. This view is from the outlet of the lake, within a few rods of the…

"Smith's House. This view is from the slope in front of the house. The main building is of stone; the wings are wood. The piazza in front of the main building, and the balustrades upon the top, are the only modern additions; otherwise the house appears the same as when Arnold and Andre were there. It stands upon a slope of <em>Treason Hill</em>, a few rods west of the road leading from Stony Point to Haverstraw, and about half way between the two places. It was in a room in the second story that the conspirators remained during the day of their arrival. The present owner of the house and grounds is Mr. William C. Houseman."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Smith's House

"Smith's House. This view is from the slope in front of the house. The main building is of stone; the…

"The Old South Meeting-house was used for a riding school."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

The Old South

"The Old South Meeting-house was used for a riding school."—Coffin, 1879

Split Rock. Soldiers left from Chimney Point to Crown Point.

Split Rock

Split Rock. Soldiers left from Chimney Point to Crown Point.

Military establishment at St. John's. This view is taken from the eastern side of the river, near the remains of a block-house erected by Montgomery when he besieged the fort in 1775. On the right is seen the fort, which incloses the magazine; in the center is the building occupied by the officers, on either side of which are the barracks of the soldiers. The large building on the left is the hospital, and the smaller one still further left is the dead-house. The river here is about a quarter of a mile wide. The present military works are upon the site of those of the Revolution.

St. John's

Military establishment at St. John's. This view is taken from the eastern side of the river, near the…

St. John's, on the Richelieu or Sorel.

St. John's

St. John's, on the Richelieu or Sorel.