The 1763-1788 American Revolution Places ClipArt gallery provides 301 illustrations of the Apollo Room, Carpenter's Hall, Concord, Faneuil Hall, Mount Vernon, the Old South Meeting House, and other locations associated with the American War for Independence.

"St. John's Church, Richmond, VA. Where the famous orator Patrick Henry made is great speech." -Gordy, 1916

St. John's Church

"St. John's Church, Richmond, VA. Where the famous orator Patrick Henry made is great speech." -Gordy,…

St. John's Gate, outside.

St. John's Gate

St. John's Gate, outside.

"The State House as it appeared in 1774."—Lossing, 1851

State House

"The State House as it appeared in 1774."—Lossing, 1851

"Walnut Street front of the State House in 1776. This gives the appearance of the shorter steeple, which took the place of the stately one taken down in 1774. This was its appearance during the Revolution. A huge clock case was upon each gable of the main building of the State House."—Lossing, 1851

State House

"Walnut Street front of the State House in 1776. This gives the appearance of the shorter steeple, which…

Steuben's head-quarters. This view is from the field in front of the house, looking north. The dwelling is at the end of a lane several rods from the main road leading to Middlebrook from New Brunswick. It is on the western side of the Raritan, and about a mile from the bridge near Middlebrook. Only the center building was in existence at the time in question, and that seems to have been enlarged. Each wing has since been added. The interior of the old part is kept in the same condition as it was when Steuben occupied it, being, like most of the better dwellings of that time, neatly wainscoted with pine, wrought into moldings and panels.

Steuben's Head-Quarters

Steuben's head-quarters. This view is from the field in front of the house, looking north. The dwelling…

"Rear view at Stony Point. This sketch presents a rear view of the old embankments of the fort, and of the light-house, which is seen by all travelers upon the river, just before entering the Highlands. The beacon stands exactly in the center of the fort, upon the site of the magazine. There was a covered way toward the water on the north side of the hill, and about twenty yards in the rear are some prominent remains of the ravelins which extended across the point."—Lossing, 1851

Stony Point

"Rear view at Stony Point. This sketch presents a rear view of the old embankments of the fort, and…

The Battle of Stony Point was a battle of the American Revolutionary War. Here is a view of Stony Point from the Southwest.

<p>"View of Stony Point from the southwest. This view shows a large portion of the morass, and the place where the assaulting party divided and prepared for an attack upon the fort, which was situated where the light-house is seen. The place of the causeway is on the left, denoted by the cattle. When I made this sketch it was quite high water, and the morass, there about one hundred feet wide, was almost covered. There was another place near the river shore, on the right, where the Point was accessible at times. It is distinguished in the sketch by the narrow strip of land extending nearly across the mouth of the morass. Upon this the enemy had dug pits and placed sharpened stakes within them, so that, had the Americans attempted to reach the Point by that way many would have been impaled."—Lossing, 1851

Stony Point

The Battle of Stony Point was a battle of the American Revolutionary War. Here is a view of Stony Point…

"Old Store-House at Turtle Bay."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Store House

"Old Store-House at Turtle Bay."—Lossing, 1851

Perhaps the worst of all the New York prisons during the American Revolution was the third Sugar House, which occupied the space on Liberty Street.

Sugar House in Liberty Street

Perhaps the worst of all the New York prisons during the American Revolution was the third Sugar House,…

"Fort Sullivan"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Sullivan

"Fort Sullivan"—Lossing, 1851

"View of 'Sunnyside,' the residence of Washington Irving. Built by Wolfert Ecker and known famously as 'Wolfert's Roost.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Sunnyside

"View of 'Sunnyside,' the residence of Washington Irving. Built by Wolfert Ecker and known famously…

"Washington's head-quarters at Tappan. This view is from the yard, near the well. The date of its erection (1700) is made by a peculiar arrangement of the bracks in the front wall. In the large room called 'Washington's quarters' the fireplace is surrounded by Dutch pictorial tiles illustrative of Scripture scenes. Indeed, the whole house remains in precisely the same condition, except what the elements have changed externally, as it was when the chief occupied it."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Tappan head-quarters

"Washington's head-quarters at Tappan. This view is from the yard, near the well. The date of its erection…

Old Tavern at Elizabethport. This view is looking eastward. In the distance, on the right, is seen a vessel, at the entrance of Newark Bay, and the land beyond is the high ground intervening between it and Jersey City. In one of the rooms of the old tavern is a Franklin stove, which has probably been a tenant there ever since it came from the foundery. I give a sketch of it, not only because it is a relic of the time, but because it doubtless shows the form of the stove as invented by Dr. Franklin in 1742, beore an "improvement" was made. On its front, in raised letters, are the words "Ross and Bird's Hibernia Foundry, 1782." Ross had a foundery at Elizabethtown in 1774, as appears by the inscription upon the dinner-bell of Sir William Johnson, now in the belfry of the old Caughnawaga Chuch at Fonda.

Tavern at Elizabethport

Old Tavern at Elizabethport. This view is looking eastward. In the distance, on the right, is seen a…

"The Temple. This view is from the site of the <em>Temple</em>, looking southeast. In the distance is seen the opening of the Highlands into Newburgh Bay. On the right is Butter Hill, and near it is the village of Cornwall. The form and appearance of the <em>Temple</em> was drawn from the description given by Major Burnet, and doubtless has a general resemblance to the original."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Temple

"The Temple. This view is from the site of the Temple, looking southeast. In the distance is…

The Conference House (also known as the Bentley Manor and the Captain Christopher Billop House)was built before 1680 and located near the southernmost tip of New York State on Staten Island. The Staten Island Peace Conference was held here on September 11, 1776, which unsuccessfully attempted to end the American Revolutionary War.

The Billop House

The Conference House (also known as the Bentley Manor and the Captain Christopher Billop House)was built…

View below the Falls. This view was taken from under the bridge, looking down the river. The cave opens upon the river just below where the figures stand.

The Falls

View below the Falls. This view was taken from under the bridge, looking down the river. The cave opens…

The Green, Fairfield

The Green, Fairfield

The Green, Fairfield

Ticonderoga at sunset.

Ticonderoga

Ticonderoga at sunset.

The crossing between Lakes George and Champlain had been used by natives for thousands of years. The town was located on the direct route, utilizing rivers and two long lakes, between New York City to the south and the French settlement of Montreal to the north. The town was the setting for historic battles and maneuvers during both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. The site of Fort Ticonderoga marked the location of an important portage between Lake George and Lake Champlain.

Ticonderoga and the Lake, from Mount Defiance

The crossing between Lakes George and Champlain had been used by natives for thousands of years. The…

View near Toby's Eddy. The Moravians had established six missionary settlements in the vicinity of the Forks of the Delaware, or the junction of the Delaware and Lehigh Rivers, viz., Nazareth, Bethlehem, Nain, Freidenshal, Gandenthaul, and Gnadenhutten. The latter, the name of which in English is "Huts of Mercy," was founded chiefly for the accommodation and protection of those Indians who embraced the Christian faith. Hence it was the first settlement attaked by the hostile savages.

Toby's Eddy

View near Toby's Eddy. The Moravians had established six missionary settlements in the vicinity of the…

"Top of Tonomy Hill. This view is from the northside of the hill, looking south. The wall appearance is a steep precipice of huge masses of pudding-stone, composed of pebbles and larger smooth stones, ranging in size from a pea to a man's head. It is a very singular geological formation. In some places the face is smooth, the stones, and pebbles appearing as if they had been cut with a knife while in a pasty or semi-fluid state. On the top of this mound are traces of the breast-works that were thrown up, not high, for the rocks formed a natural rampart, on all sides but one, against an enemy, Here Miantonomoh had his fort, and here his councils were held when he planned his expeditions agains the Mohegans. The observatory is a strong frame covered with lattice-work. On the right is seen the city of Newport in the distance."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Tonomy Hill

"Top of Tonomy Hill. This view is from the northside of the hill, looking south. The wall appearance…

"Torn Rock. This view is from the verge of the dam above the Ramapo works, near the rail-way, looking northeast. The eminence is called Torn Rock, from its ragged appearance on its southeastern side. There is a deep fissure in a portion of the bare rock, from which comes up a sound like the ticking of a watch, caused by the water which percolates through the seams in the granite. A tradition was long current that Washington lost his watch in the fissure, and that, by some miraculous power, it continued to tick!'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Torn Rock

"Torn Rock. This view is from the verge of the dam above the Ramapo works, near the rail-way, looking…

"Trading Ford. This view of the Trading Ford, where greene, with Morgan and his light troops, crossed the Yadkin, is from the east side of the river. It is just at the foot of an island, about a mile and a half below the great bridge on the road to Salisbury. The river is usually fordable between the island and the stakes seen in the picture; below that point the water is deep."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Trading Ford

"Trading Ford. This view of the Trading Ford, where greene, with Morgan and his light troops, crossed…

"Trenton Bridge and vicinity. This view is from the north side of the Assanpink, a few rods above the bridge, looking south. The bridge, seen upon the right, is built of stone, and very strong, and is upon the site of the old one. The creek is curbed by a dam near the bridge, and forms the sheet of water seen in the picture. The old 'Stacey Mill' of the Revolution, the largest building in the sketch, was quite dilapidated from the effects of fire and flood, when I was there. The two old houses on the left of it are of stone, covered with stucco, and were there at the time in question. On the bank, between them and the house of Mr. Timothy Abbott, seen on the extreme left, was a building used as a tavern, in the Revolution. It was demolished a few years ago. Along the high bank, from the mill eastward to the rail-way, now covered with houses and gardens, and also westward, some distance toward the Delaware, the Americans were encamped. The bank was being terraced when I visited Trenton, and will, in time, be a beautiful spot."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Trenton

"Trenton Bridge and vicinity. This view is from the north side of the Assanpink, a few rods above the…

John Trumbull Birthplace, also known as Governor Jonathan Trumbull House, is a house on Lebanon Green, in Lebanon, Connecticut. The house was constructed by Joseph Trumbull as a wedding gift for his son Jonathan Trumbull, who became governor. Jonathan's son John Trumbull was born in the house June 6, 1756. He would go on to serve as an aide to George Washington in the Revolutionary War and paint four of the eight historical paintings which adorn the United States Capitol rotunda. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1965.

Governor Jonathan Trumbull House

John Trumbull Birthplace, also known as Governor Jonathan Trumbull House, is a house on Lebanon Green,…

Jonathan Trumbull, Sr. (12 October 1710 &ndash; 17 August 1785) was one of the few men who served as governor in both a pre-Revolutionary colony and a post-Revolutionary state. He was a friend and advisor of General Washington throughout the revolutionary period, dedicating the resources of Connecticut to the fight for independence. He was the only colonial governor to continue in office through the American revolution.

Governor Trumbull's War Office

Jonathan Trumbull, Sr. (12 October 1710 – 17 August 1785) was one of the few men who served as…

Landing-place of General Tryon.

Tryon Landing

Landing-place of General Tryon.

"Front view of Tryon's Palace. The view here given was the north front, toward the town. The center edifice was the palace. The building on the right was the secretary's office and the laundry; that upon the left was the kitchen and servant's hall. These were connected with the palace by a curviform colonmade, of five columns each, and covered. Between these buildings, in front of the palace, was a handsome court. The rear of the building was finished in the style of the Mansion-House in London."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Tryon Palace

"Front view of Tryon's Palace. The view here given was the north front, toward the town. The center…

"View at Tuckesege Ford. This view is from the western bank of the Catawba, looking down the stream."—Lossing, 1851

Tuckesege Ford

"View at Tuckesege Ford. This view is from the western bank of the Catawba, looking down the stream."—Lossing,…

"View at Turtle Bay. Turtle Bay is a small rock-bound cove of the East River, at the foot of Forty-seventh Street. The banks are high and precipitous, and afforded a safe retreat for small vessels. Here the government had made a magazine of military stores, and these the Sons of Liberty determined to seize. Under the direction of Lamb, Sears, Willett, and McDougal, a party procured a sloop at Greenwich, came stealthily through the dangerous vortex of Hell Gate at twilight, and at midnight surprised and captured the guard, and secured the stores. The old store-house in which they were deposited is yet standing upon a wharf on the southern side of the little bay. The above view is from the bank at the foot of Forty-sixth Street. Beyond the rocky point on the north side of the bay is seen the lower end of Blackwell's Island, with the shore of Long Island in the distance. On the left of the old store-house, is seen the bridge across the mouth of Newtown Creek, a locality which will be mentioned presently in connection with a notice of the landing of troops under Sir Henry Clinton."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Turtle Bay

"View at Turtle Bay. Turtle Bay is a small rock-bound cove of the East River, at the foot of Forty-seventh…

The headquarters in Valley Forge of General George Washington during the American Revolution.

Washington's Headquarters at Valley Forge

The headquarters in Valley Forge of General George Washington during the American Revolution.

Van Cortlandt's Sugar House was a famous (or infamous) prison of the Revolution. It stood on the northwest corner of Trinity church-yard.

Van Cortlandt's Sugar House

Van Cortlandt's Sugar House was a famous (or infamous) prison of the Revolution. It stood on the northwest…

Van Schaick's Mill. This view is taken from the left bank of the Walloomscoick, a little below the bridge. The mill belonged to a Whig named Van Schaick, who had joined General Stark's collecting forces at Bennington.

Van Schaick's Mill

Van Schaick's Mill. This view is taken from the left bank of the Walloomscoick, a little below the bridge.…

The Vankleek House. It was built by Myndert Vankleek, one of the first settlers in Dutchess county, in 1702, and was the first substantial house erected upon the site of Poughkeepsie. Its walls were very thick, and near the eaves they were pierced with lancet loop-holes for musketry. It was here that Ann Lee, the founder of the sect called Shaking Quakers, in this country, was lodged the night previous to her commitment to the Poughkeepsie jail, in 1776. She was a native of Manchester, England. During her youth she was employed in a cotton factory, and afterward as a cook in the Manchester infirmary. She married a blacksmith named Stanley; became acquainted with James and Jane Wardley, the originators of the sect in England, and in 1758 joined the small society they had formed. In 1770 she pretended to have received a revelation, while confined in prison on account of her religious fanaticism; and so great were the spiritual gifts she was believed to possess, that she was soon acknowledged a spirtual mother in Christ. Hence her name of Mother Ann. She and her husband came to New York in 1774. He soon afterward abandoned her and her faith, and married another woman. She collected a few followers, and in 1776 took up her abode in the woods of Watervliet, near Niskayuna, in the neighborhood of Troy. By some she was charged with witchcraft; and, because she was opposed to war, she was accused of secret correspondence with the British. A charge of high reason was preferred against her, and she was imprisoned in Albany during the summer. In the fall it was concluded to send her to New York, and banish her to the British army, but circumstances prevented the accomplishment of the design, and she was imprisoned in the Poughkeepsie jail until Governor Clinton, in 1777, hearing of her situation, released her. She returned to Watervliet, and her followers greatly increased. She died there in 1784, aged eighty-four years. Her followers sincerely believe that she now occupies that form or figure which John saw in his vision, standing beside the Savior.

Vankleek House

The Vankleek House. It was built by Myndert Vankleek, one of the first settlers in Dutchess county,…

"Washington's head-quarters. This view is from the Reading rail-road, looking east, and includes a portion of the range of hills in the rear whereon the Americans were encamped. The main building was erected in 1770; the wing is more modern, and occupies the place of the log addition mentioned by Mrs. Washington, in a letter to Mercy Warren, written in March, 1778: 'The general's apartment,' she wrote, 'is very small; he has had a log cabin built to dine in, which has made our quarters much more tolerable than they were at first.'"—Lossing, 1851

Washington's head-quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. This view is from the Reading rail-road, looking east, and includes a portion…

"Washington's head-quarters. I was informed by the venerable Anna van Antwerp, about a fortnight before her death, in the autumn of 1851, that Washington made his head-quarters, on first entering the city, at the spacious house (half of which is yet standing at 180 Pearl Street, opposite Cedar Street), delineated in the engraving. The large window, with no arch, toward the right, indicates the center of the original building. It is of brick, stuccoed, and roofed with tiles. There Washington remained until sommoned to visit Congress at Philadelphia, toward the last of May. On his return, he went to the Kennedy House, No. 1 Broadway, where he remained until the evacuation in September."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Head-Quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. I was informed by the venerable Anna van Antwerp, about a fortnight before…

"Washington's head-quarters. The house occupied by Washington while the army was at White Plains is yet standing. It is a frame building, on the east side of the road, about two miles above the village. This view is from the road, looking northeast. When I last visited it (1851), Miss Jemima Miller, a maiden ninety-three yeras of age, and her sister, a few years her junior, were living therein, the home of their childhood. A chair and table, used by the chief, is carefully preserved by the family, and a register for the names of the numerous visitors is kept. This house was in the deep solitude of the forests, among the hills, when Washington was there; now the heights and the plain near by smile with cultivation."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Head-Quarters

"Washington's head-quarters. The house occupied by Washington while the army was at White Plains is…

Washington used the home as his headquarters and home while he planned the Siege of Boston between July 1775 and April 1776. During his time there, Washington was visited by John Adams and Abigail Adams, Benedict Arnold, Henry Knox, and Nathaniel Greene. Martha Washington joined her husband in December 1775 and the two stayed in the house until March 1776. On Twelfth Night in January 1776, the couple celebrated their wedding anniversary in the home.

Washington's Headquarters at Cambridge, 1775

Washington used the home as his headquarters and home while he planned the Siege of Boston between July…

The Ford Mansion is part of the Morristown National Historical Park, and is located on a hilltop in Morristown, New Jersey. The Ford Mansion was the "hard winter" (from December 1779 - May 1780) quarters of George Washington and the Continental Army. That winter remains the coldest on record for New Jersey.

Washington's Headquarters at Morristown

The Ford Mansion is part of the Morristown National Historical Park, and is located on a hilltop in…

The Morris-Jumel Mansion (also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House), located in historic Washington Heights, is the oldest house in Manhattan. It served as a headquarters for both sides in the American Revolution. Between September 14 and October 20, 1776, General George Washington used the mansion as his temporary headquarters after he and his army were forced to evacuate Brooklyn Heights following their loss to the British Army under the command of General William Howe in the Battle of Long Island.

Washington's Headquarters at New York

The Morris-Jumel Mansion (also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House), located in historic…

The headquarters of Washington at Tappan, New York.

Washington's Headquarters at Tappan

The headquarters of Washington at Tappan, New York.

Hasbrouck House served as Washington's headquarters during the Revolutionary War from April 1782 until August 1783. It was chosen for its comparatively safe location north of the strategically important West Point. The 7,000 troops of the Continental Army were encamped near what is today known as Vails Gate, a few miles to the southwest.

Entrance to Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh

Hasbrouck House served as Washington's headquarters during the Revolutionary War from April 1782 until…

"Washington's Quarters. This is a view of the southwest front of the mansion. The room occupied by Washington is in the second story, opening out upon the piazza. It is about eighteen feet square, and in one corner is a Franklin stove. The situation of the house, upon an aminence an eighth of a mile eastward of the Millstone River, is very pelasant. It is now quite dilapidated; the piazzais unsafe to stand upon."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Washington's Quarters

"Washington's Quarters. This is a view of the southwest front of the mansion. The room occupied by Washington…

"View at Fort Washington. This is a view from the site of the interior works at Fort Washington from the foot of the flag-staff, loking southwest. In the foreground are seen the remains of the embankments. The tall mast seen near the river below is the support for telegraph wires which cross the Hudson there, from the rocky point of Jefrrey's Hook. In the distance across the river are the Palisades, and the mast upon their summit denotes the site of the redoubt north of Fort Lee. This little sketch exhibits the relative position of Forts Washington and Lee."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Washington

"View at Fort Washington. This is a view from the site of the interior works at Fort Washington from…

"Site of Fort Watson."—Lossing, 1851

<p>The Siege of Fort Watson was an American Revolutionary War confrontation in South Carolina that began on April 15, 1781 and lasted until April 23, 1781. Continental Army forces under Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee and South Carolina militia under Francis Marion besieged Fort Watson, a fortified British outpost that formed part of the communication and supply chain between Charleston and other British outposts further inland.

<p>The attackers, lacking artillery, were unable to make a dent in the fortified works, and failed in attempts to deny the garrison of a water supply. They then devised a plan to build a tower from which sharpshooters could fire into the fort's walls. Fort Watson was once again attacked by the Americans on April 23, with the British forces unable to control the walls due to musket fire from the tower. They surrendered shortly afterwards.

Fort Watson

"Site of Fort Watson."—Lossing, 1851 The Siege of Fort Watson was an American Revolutionary War confrontation…

The Webb House. This house is still standing (1848), in the central part of Wethersfield, a few rods south of the Congregational Church.

Webb House

The Webb House. This house is still standing (1848), in the central part of Wethersfield, a few rods…

Joseph Webb House is a historic Georgian-style house in Wethersfield, Connecticut that was the site of a five day military conference during the American Revolutionary War. General George Washington came to Wethersfield in order to plan with Rochambeau, the French commander. These plans led to the Siege of Yorktown, the last major battle of the war. Washington, in his words, "lodged...at the house of Joseph Webb", on the May 17, 1781. This house is in the central part of Wethersfield, a few rods south of the Congregational Church.

The Webb House

Joseph Webb House is a historic Georgian-style house in Wethersfield, Connecticut that was the site…

West Point under the control of the British, secured by Benedict Arnold.

West Point

West Point under the control of the British, secured by Benedict Arnold.

"West Point in 1780. This view is from a print published in the <em>New York Magazine</em> for 1790. It was taken from Constitution Island. On the left is seen a portion of old Fort Constitution. The great chain, four hundred and fifty yards in length, and covered by a strong battery, is seen stretched across the river, immediately below Fort Clinton, the structure on the high point. In the distance, on the left, two mountain summits are seen, crowned with fortifications. These were the North and Middle Redoubts. Upon the range of the Sugar Loaf Mountain, higher than these, and hidden, in the view, by Fort Clinton, was another redoubt, called the South Battery."—Lossing, 1851

West Point

"West Point in 1780. This view is from a print published in the New York Magazine for 1790.…

"South of the fort a short distance was a brick house with 'I.A.W. 1748' on one of the gables, the initials standing for James and Anna Whitall. The house had been built twenty-nine years. Mr. Whitall lived there with his wife and family. He was a Quaker, and a good Whig. Seeing that the battle was about to begin, he and his wife left the house; but his mother, an old lady, would not leave."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Whitall's House at Red Bank

"South of the fort a short distance was a brick house with 'I.A.W. 1748' on one of the gables, the initials…

"Washington's head-quarters near Whitemarsh."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Whitemarsh head-quarters

"Washington's head-quarters near Whitemarsh."—Lossing, 1851

William's Rock. This view is taken from the road, looking northward. In the distance is seen the highest point of the French Mountain, on the left of which is Lake George. From this commanding height the French scouts had a fine view of all the English movements at the head of the lake.

William's Rock

William's Rock. This view is taken from the road, looking northward. In the distance is seen the highest…

"Landing-place of Roger Williams. This view is on the left bank of the Seekonk, looking south. The point on which the figure stands is the famous rock, composed of a mass of dark slate, and rising but little above the water at high tide. The high banks are seen beyond, and on the extreme left is India Point, with the rail-road bridge near the entrance of the river into Narraganset Bay."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Williams landing-place

"Landing-place of Roger Williams. This view is on the left bank of the Seekonk, looking south. The point…

Wind-mill Point. This view was sketched from the steam-boat, when a little below the wind-mill, looking west-north-west. The mill is a strong stone structure, and answered a very good purpose for a fort or block-house. Its narrow windows were used by the patriots as loop-holes for their muskets during the action.

Wind-Mill Point

Wind-mill Point. This view was sketched from the steam-boat, when a little below the wind-mill, looking…

The Battle of Wyoming was an encounter during the American Revolutionary War between American Patriots and Loyalists accompanied by Iroquois raiders that took place in Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, on July 3, 1778. More than three hundred Patriots were killed in a battle followed by a massacre, in which the Iroquois raiders hunted and killed fleeing Patriots before torturing to death thirty to forty who had surrendered.

<p>Site of Wintermoot's Fort. This view is from the ancient bed of the Susquehanna, looking west. The building, formerly the property of Colonel Jenkins, and now owned by Mr. David Goodwin, is upon the site of old Fort Wintermoot, which was destroyed at the time of the invasion in 1778. It is upon the ancient bank of the river, here from fifteen to twenty feeth high, and about sixty rods from the stream in its present channel.

Site of Wintermoot's Fort

The Battle of Wyoming was an encounter during the American Revolutionary War between American Patriots…

Site of Wintermoot's Fort. This view is from the ancient bed of the Susquehanna, looking west. The building, formerly the property of Colonel Jenkins, and now owned by Mr. David Goodwin, is upon the site of old Fort Wintermoot, which was destroyed at the time of the invasion in 1778. It is upon the ancient bank of the river, here from fifteen to twenty feeth high, and about sixty rods from the stream in its present channel.

Wintermoot's Fort

Site of Wintermoot's Fort. This view is from the ancient bed of the Susquehanna, looking west. The building,…

Wolfe's Ravine. This scene is about half way up the ravine from Wolfe's Cove, looking down the road, which is a steep and winding way from the river to the summit of the Plains of Abraham. It is a cool, shaded nook- a delightful retreat from the din and dust of the city in summer.

Wolfe's Ravine

Wolfe's Ravine. This scene is about half way up the ravine from Wolfe's Cove, looking down the road,…

Place where Wooster fell.

Wooster Fell

Place where Wooster fell.

"Bridge at Worth's Mill's. This substantial stone bridge, over Stony Brook, is upon the site of the wooden one destroyed on the 3d of January, 1777. The old mill on the left is now owned by Josiah S. Worth, a son of the propietor during the Revolution. This sketch was made from the road on the bank of the stream, along which Mercer and his detachment marched to secure the bridge."—Lossing, 1851

Worth's Mills

"Bridge at Worth's Mill's. This substantial stone bridge, over Stony Brook, is upon the site of the…

The Yeoman House. This view is from the road, looking north. An attempt was made by a soldier to burn the house, but so rapid was the march of the invaders that the flames had made but little progress before the troops were far on their road to the village. An [African American] woman, who was concealed under some corn-stalks near, extinguished the flames. The house is about half a mile from the river, on the right side of the road from the landing to Kingston village.

Yeoman House

The Yeoman House. This view is from the road, looking north. An attempt was made by a soldier to burn…