The 1763-1788 American Revolution Monuments and Grave Sites ClipArt gallery includes 61 illustrations of the resting places of major figures of the American Revolution.

"Place of execution. The place of Andre's execution is now designated by a stone, lying on the right of a lane which runs from the highway from Tappan village to old Tappan, on the westerly side of a large peach orchard owned by Dr. Bartow, about a quarter of a mile from Washington's head-quarters. The stone is a small bowlder, on the upper surface of which is inscribed 'Andre executed Oct. 2d, 1780.' It is about three feet in length. This stone was placed there and inscribed in 1847, by a patriotic merchant of New York. A more elegant and durable monument should be erected upon the spot."—Lossing, 1851

Andre's Execution

"Place of execution. The place of Andre's execution is now designated by a stone, lying on the right…

"Andre's monument in Westminster Abbey."—Lossing, 1851

Andre's Monument

"Andre's monument in Westminster Abbey."—Lossing, 1851

A monument to mark the spot of the site where the British spy Andre was hanged and buried in 1780.

Monument to Andre

A monument to mark the spot of the site where the British spy Andre was hanged and buried in 1780.

Monument at the place where General Isaac Brock fell.

Monument where General Brock fell

Monument at the place where General Isaac Brock fell.

"Bunker Hill Monument. This monument stands in the center of the grounds included within the breast-works of the old redoubt on Breed's Hill. Its sides are precisely parallel with those of the redoubt. It is built of Quincy granite, and is two hundred and twenty-one feet in height. The foundation is composed of six courses of stones, and extends twelve feet below the surface of the ground and base of the shaft. The four sides of the foundation extend about fifty feet horizontally. There are in the whole pile ninety courses of stone, six of them below the surface of the ground, and eighty-four above. The foundation is laid in lime mortar; the other parts of the structure in lime mortar mixed with cinders, iron filings, and Springfield hydranlic cement."—Lossing, 1851

Bunker Hill Monument

"Bunker Hill Monument. This monument stands in the center of the grounds included within the breast-works…

Monument for Bunker Hill.

Bunker Hill Monument

Monument for Bunker Hill.

Caldwell's monument. The following are the inscriptions upon the Caldwell monument: East Side: "This monument is erected to the memory of the Rev. James Caldwell, the pious and fervent Christian, the zealous and faithful minister, the eloquent preacher, and a prominent leader among the worthies who secured the independence of his country. His name will be cherished in the church and in the state so long as Virtue is esteemed and Patriotism honored." West Side: "Hannah, wife of the Rev. James Caldwell, and daughter of Johnathan Ogden, of Newark, was killed at Connecticut Farms by a shot from a British soldier, June 25th, 1780, cruelty sacrificed by the enemies of her husband and of her country." North Side: "The memory of the just is blessed. Be of good courage- and let us behave ourselves valiant for our people, and for the cities of our God, and let the Lord do that which is good in his sight. The glory of children are their fathers." South Side: "James Caldwell. Born in Charlotte county, in Virginia, April, 1734. Graduated at Princeton College, 1759. Ordained pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Elizabethtown, 1762. After serving as chaplain in the army of the Revolution, and acting as commissary to the troops in New Jersey, he was killed by a shot from a sentinel at Elizabethtown Point, November 24th, 1781."

Caldwell's Monument

Caldwell's monument. The following are the inscriptions upon the Caldwell monument: East Side: "This…

Campbell's Monument. This rude memorial was erected in 1831, by J. W. Barber, Esq., of New Haven, the historian of that city, and author of the <em>Historical Collections of Connecticut</em>, as a tribute of respect for a meritorious officer. It is about a foot and a half high. The site of Campbell's grave was pointed out to Mr. Barber by the late Chauncy Alling, who saw him buried. Several Americans, who were killed at the same time, were buried near. Their remains were afterward removed. Those of Adjutant Campbell rest undisturbed.

Campbell's Monument

Campbell's Monument. This rude memorial was erected in 1831, by J. W. Barber, Esq., of New Haven, the…

"Chatham's monument, Westminster Abbey. William Pitt, the first Earl of Chatham, was born on the 5th of November, 1708."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Chatham's Monument

"Chatham's monument, Westminster Abbey. William Pitt, the first Earl of Chatham, was born on the 5th…

Grave of Colonel Robert Cochran, who commanded a detachment of militia at Fort Edward at the time of Burgoyne's surrender.

Cochran Grave

Grave of Colonel Robert Cochran, who commanded a detachment of militia at Fort Edward at the time of…

"Monument at Concord."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Concord Monument

"Monument at Concord."—Lossing, 1851

Rhode Island Governor Nicholas Cooke's Monument.

Governor Nicholas Cooke's Monument

Rhode Island Governor Nicholas Cooke's Monument.

The monument of Richard Dale (1756-1826), a naval officer born in Norfolk County, VA.

Richard Dale's Monument

The monument of Richard Dale (1756-1826), a naval officer born in Norfolk County, VA.

Monument to Johann von Robaii, Baron de Kalb a German soldier and volunteer who served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.

Baron de Kalb's Monument

Monument to Johann von Robaii, Baron de Kalb a German soldier and volunteer who served as a major general…

"Count Donop's Grave."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Donop's Grave

"Count Donop's Grave."—Lossing, 1851

Tomb of Ethan Allen as seen in 1851. Shortly thereafter, this original plaque disappeared. In 1858, a 42-foot column bas placed in the cemetery by the Vermont Legislature in his memory.

Ethan Allen Tomb

Tomb of Ethan Allen as seen in 1851. Shortly thereafter, this original plaque disappeared. In 1858,…

Fraser's burial-place. The hill on which the 'great redoubt' was erected, and where General Fraser was buried, is about one hundred feet high, and almost directly west from the house wherein he died. The relative situation of this eminence to the Hudson will be best understood by looking at the view of Burgoyne's encampment. The grave is within the inclosure on the summit of the hill.

Fraser Burial

Fraser's burial-place. The hill on which the 'great redoubt' was erected, and where General Fraser was…

"Monument at Goshen. During the battle, Major Wood, of Goshen, made a masonic sign, by accident, which Brant, who was a Free-mason, perceived and heeded. Wood's life was spared, and as a prisoner he was treated kindly, until the Mohawk chief perceived that he was not a Mason. Then, with withering scorn, Brant looked upon Wood, believing that he had obtained the masonic sign which he used, by deception. It was purely an accident on the part of Wood. When released, he hastened to become a member of the fraternity by whose instrumentality his life had been spared. The house in which Major Wood lived is yet standing (though much altered), at the foot of the hill north of the rail-way station at Goshen. The house of Roger Townsend, who was among the slain, is also standing, and well preserved. It is in the southern part of the village."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Goshen Monument

"Monument at Goshen. During the battle, Major Wood, of Goshen, made a masonic sign, by accident, which…

"Greene and Pulaski monument."—Lossing, 1851

Greene and Pulaski Monument

"Greene and Pulaski monument."—Lossing, 1851

"Monument at Groton. This is a view from the southwest angle of old Fort Griswold, looking northeast. The embankments of the fort are seen in the foreground; near the figure is the well, the same mentioned by Mr. Hempstead in his narrative; and just beyond this is the old entrance, or sally-port, through which the enemy, under Broomfield, entered the fort."—Lossing, 1851

<p>It is dedicated to the defenders who fell during the Battle of Groton Heights on September 6, 1781. Built between 1826 and 1830, the Monument stands 135 feet tall with 166 steps. A plaque affixed to the monument above the entrance reads
"THIS MONUMENT WAS ERECTED UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, A.D. 1830, AND IN THE 55TH YEAR OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF THE U.S.A. IN MEMORY OF THE BRAVE PATRIOTS, WHO FELL IN THE MASSACRE AT FORT GRISWOLD, NEAR THIS SPOT, ON THE 6TH OF SEPT. A.D. 1781, WHEN THE BRITISH, UNDER THE COMMAND OF THE TRAITOR, BENEDICT ARNOLD, BURNT THE TOWNS OF NEW LONDON AND GROTON, AND SPREAD DESOLATION AND WOE THROUGHOUT THIS REGION."

Groton Monument

"Monument at Groton. This is a view from the southwest angle of old Fort Griswold, looking northeast.…

General Herkimer's grave.

Herkimer's Grave

General Herkimer's grave.

"Hopkins' Monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Hopkins Monument

"Hopkins' Monument."—Lossing, 1851

Humphrey's monument.

Humphrey's Monument

Humphrey's monument.

"Governor Huntington's Tomb."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Huntington's Tomb

"Governor Huntington's Tomb."—Lossing, 1851

"General Huntington's Tomb."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Huntington's Tomb

"General Huntington's Tomb."—Lossing, 1851

The Battle of Kings Mountain, October 7, 1780, was an important Patriot victory in the Southern campaign of the American Revolutionary War.

Monument on King's Mountain

The Battle of Kings Mountain, October 7, 1780, was an important Patriot victory in the Southern campaign…

"La Fayette's tomb."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

La Fayette's Tomb

"La Fayette's tomb."—Lossing, 1851

The tomb of General Lafayette.

Lafayette's Tomb

The tomb of General Lafayette.

"Monument at Lexington. This view is from the Concord Road, looking eastward, and shows a portion of the inclosure of the Green. The distant building seen on the right is the old 'Buckman Tavern,' delineated in Doolittle's engraving. It now belongs to Mrs. Merriam, and exhibits many scars made by the bullets on the morning of the skirmish."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lexington Monument

"Monument at Lexington. This view is from the Concord Road, looking eastward, and shows a portion of…

"Monument at Lexington, up close view."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Lexington Monument

"Monument at Lexington, up close view."—Lossing, 1851

"Mathers' Vault."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Mathers' Vault

"Mathers' Vault."—Lossing, 1851

Grave of Jane McCrea.

McCrea Grave

Grave of Jane McCrea.

"Monument to General Mercer."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Mercer Monument

"Monument to General Mercer."—Lossing, 1851

Wolfe and Montcalm's monument.

Montcalm's Monument

Wolfe and Montcalm's monument.

Richard Montgomery's Monument, states: "This monument is erected by order of Congress, 25th of January, 1776, to transmit to posterity a grateful remembrance of the patriotic conduct, enterprise, and preseverance of Major-general Richard Montgomery, who, after a series of success amid the most discouraging difficulties, fell in the attack on Quebec, 31st December, 1775, aged 37 yeras.

Richard Montgomery's Monument

Richard Montgomery's Monument, states: "This monument is erected by order of Congress, 25th of January,…

"Nash's monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Nash's Monument

"Nash's monument."—Lossing, 1851

"The Nelson Tombs. This view is from the burial-ground looking down the York River toward Chesapeake Bay. The inscription upon the first monument is in Latin; the following is a translation of it: 'Here lies, in certain hope of a resurrection in Christ, Thomas Nelson, gentleman, son of Hugo and Sarah Nelson, of Penrith, in the county of Cumberland; born February 20th, A. D. 1677, died October 7th, 1745, aged sixty-eight years.' The inscription upon the second monument is much longer, and quite eulogistic. William Nelson was president of his majesty's council in Virginia, and died on the nineteenth of November, 1772, at the age of sixty-one years. No epitaph tells of the many virtues and heroic deeds of him who lies in the obscure vault beyond. History has written them upon the enduring pages of the chronicles of our republic; and in this work his biography and portrait may be found among those of the signers of the Delcaration of Independence."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Nelson Tombs

"The Nelson Tombs. This view is from the burial-ground looking down the York River toward Chesapeake…

The Battle of Paoli (also known as the Battle of Paoli Tavern or the Paoli Massacre) was a battle in the Philadelphia campaign of the American Revolutionary War fought on September 21, 1777.

Paoli Monument

The Battle of Paoli (also known as the Battle of Paoli Tavern or the Paoli Massacre) was a battle in…

"Paulding's Monument and St. Peter's Church. The site of this church and the grave-yard was a gift of Andrew Johnson, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey. The parish was called St. Peter's; and this and the parish of St. Philip, in the Highlands, were endowed with two hundred acres of land by Colonel Beverly Robinson."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Paulding's Monument and St. Peter's Church

"Paulding's Monument and St. Peter's Church. The site of this church and the grave-yard was a gift of…

"Perry's Monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Perry's Monument

"Perry's Monument."—Lossing, 1851

An illustration of the Pulanski monument located in Savannah, Georgia. Pulaski was laid out in 1837 and is named for General Casimir Pulaski, a Polish-born Revolutionary War hero who died of wounds received in the Siege of Savannah (1776). It is one of the few squares without a monument -- General Pulaski's statues is actually in nearby Monterey Square.

Pulaski Monument

An illustration of the Pulanski monument located in Savannah, Georgia. Pulaski was laid out in 1837…

"Monument at Red Bank. This view includes the monument, a portion of the Delaware, and the mouth of the Schuylkill, on the western shore."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Red Bank Monument

"Monument at Red Bank. This view includes the monument, a portion of the Delaware, and the mouth of…

"The sarcophagus of Washington. This was placed in the family vault in the autumn of 1837."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Sarcophagus of Washington

"The sarcophagus of Washington. This was placed in the family vault in the autumn of 1837."—Lossing,…

"Bishop Seabury's Monument. The following is the inscription upon the slab: 'Here lieth the body of Samuel Seabury, D.D., bishop of Connecticut and Rhode Island, who departed from this transitory scene February 25th, Anno Domini 1796, in the 68th year of his age, and the 12th of his Episcopal consecration."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Seabury's Monument

"Bishop Seabury's Monument. The following is the inscription upon the slab: 'Here lieth the body of…

"Steuben's rural monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Steuben's Monument

"Steuben's rural monument."—Lossing, 1851

"Steuben's mural monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Steuben's Mural

"Steuben's mural monument."—Lossing, 1851

John Cleves Symmes (July 21st, 1742&ndash;February 26, 1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey, and later a pioneer in the Northwest Territory.

Symmes's Monument

John Cleves Symmes (July 21st, 1742–February 26, 1814) was a delegate to the Continental Congress…

"Treaty Monument. This monument stands near the intersection of Hanover and Beach Streets, Kensington, on the spot where the celebrated <em>Treaty Tree</em> stood. The tree was blown down in 1810, when it was ascertained to be 283 years old. When the British were in possession of Philadelphia, during the winter of 1778, their foraging parties were out in every direction for fuel. To protect this tree from the ax, Colonel Simcoe, of the Queen's Rangers, placed a sentinel under it. Of its remains, many chairs, vases, work-stands, and other articles have been made. The commemorative monument was erected by the Penn Society. Upon it are the following inscriptions: North Side: 'Treaty ground of William Penn and the indian nation, 1682. Unbroken Faith.' South Side: 'William Penn, born 1644. Died, 1718.' West Side: 'Placed by the Penn Society, A. D. 1827, to mark the site of the great Elm Tree.' East Side: 'Pennsylvania founded, 1681, by deeds of Peace.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Treaty Monument

"Treaty Monument. This monument stands near the intersection of Hanover and Beach Streets, Kensington,…

A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, in theory built to celebrate a victory in war, actually used to celebrate a ruler. This specific Triumphal Arch was erected near Philadelphia for the reception of General Washington, April 20, 1789.

Triumphal Arch for the Reception of General Washington

A triumphal arch is a structure in the shape of a monumental archway, in theory built to celebrate a…

Thomas Truxtun (February 17, 1755 – May 5, 1822) was an American naval officer who rose to the rank of commodore. Born near Hempstead, New York on Long Island, Truxtun had little formal education before joining the crew of the British merchant ship Pitt at the age of twelve. By the time he was twenty, however, his talents had garnered him the command of his own vessel, the Andrew Caldwell. He operated as a privateer during the American Revolutionary War, commanding several ships: Congress, Independence, Mars and St. James. Truxtun was highly successful in capturing enemy ships during this period, not once suffering a defeat. He was buried at Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Thomas Truxtun's Grave

Thomas Truxtun (February 17, 1755 – May 5, 1822) was an American naval officer who rose to the rank…

"Van Wart's monument. The following are the inscriptions upon this monument: North Side: 'Here repose the mortal remains of Isaac Van Wart, an elder in the Greenburgh church, who died on the 23d of May, 1828, in the 69th year of his age. Having lived the life, he died the death, of the Christian. South Side: 'The citizens of the county of West Chester erected this tomb in testimony of the high sense they entertained for the virtuous and patriotic conduct of their fellow-citizen, as a memorial sacred to public graditute.' East Side: 'Vincent, Amor Patriae. Nearly half a century before this monument was built, the conscript fathers of America had, in the Senate chamber, voted that Isaac Van Wart was a faithful patriot, one in whom the love of country was invincible, and this tomb bears testimony that the record is true.' West Side: 'Fidelity. On the 23d of September, 1780, Isaac Van Wart, accompanied by John Paulding and David Williams, all farmers of the county of West Chester, intercepted Major Andre, on his return from the American lines in the character of a spy, and, notwithstanding the large bribes offered them for his release, nobly disclaimed to sacrifice their country for gold, secured and carried him to the commanding officer of the district, whereby the dangerous and traitorous conspiracy of Arnold was brought to light, the insiduous designs of the enemy, baffled, the American army saved, and our beloved country free.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Van Wart's Monument

"Van Wart's monument. The following are the inscriptions upon this monument: North Side: 'Here repose…

"Warren's monument."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Warren's Monument

"Warren's monument."—Lossing, 1851

Warren's Monument was created in memory of Mason and fallen Bunker Hill hero Dr. Joseph Warren in 1794 by King Solomon's Lodge of Masons and was initially an 18 foot (5.5 m) wooden pillar topped with a gilt urn.

Warren's Monument

Warren's Monument was created in memory of Mason and fallen Bunker Hill hero Dr. Joseph Warren in 1794…

"Washington Monument. The following are the inscriptions on the monument: East front: 'To George Washington, by the State of Maryland. Born 23d February, 1732. Died 14th December, 1799.' South front: 'To George Washington, President of the United States, 4th March, 1789. Returned to Mount Vernon, 4th March, 1797.' West front: To George Washington. Trenton, 25th December, 1776. Yorktown, 19th October, 1781.' North Front: 'To George Washington. Commander-in-chief of the American armies, 15th June, 1775. Commission resigned at Annapolis, 23d December, 1783.'"—Lossing, 1851

Washington Monument

"Washington Monument. The following are the inscriptions on the monument: East front: 'To George Washington,…

General Anthony Wayne's monument at St. David's Episcopal Church, Radnor, Pennsylvania.

Wayne's Monument

General Anthony Wayne's monument at St. David's Episcopal Church, Radnor, Pennsylvania.

A monument celebrating General James Wolfe and Louis-Joseph de Montcalm.

Wolfe Monument

A monument celebrating General James Wolfe and Louis-Joseph de Montcalm.

Wolfe's Monument. Since 1848, the remains of this monument have been removed, and a column forty feet high, surmounted by a bronze helmet and sword, has been erected. The monument is from the design of Sir James Alexander.

Wolfe's Monument

Wolfe's Monument. Since 1848, the remains of this monument have been removed, and a column forty feet…

"Woodhull's Grave. Nathaniel Woodhull was born at Mastic, Long Island, December 30, 1722. Agriculture was the chief pursuit of his life. He was a major, under Abercrombie, in the attack upon Crown Point and Ticonderoga, and afterward accompanied Bradstreet against Fort Frontenac. He was a colonel, under Amherst, in 1760, and at the close of the campaign he returned home and married Ruth Floyd. He espoused the popular side in the Stamp Act movements, and, possessing the esteem of the people, he was elected, with William Nicoll, a representative of Suffolk county, in the Colonial Assembly in 1769. He represented Suffolk in the first Provincial Congress in 1775, and was elected president of that body. He was appointed a brigadier of militia in August of that year, and in July, 1776, he was summoned home to embody the militia of Suffolk and Queens, to assist in repelling invasion. He was engaged in this service when he ws made a prisoner, cruelly wounded by a British officer, and died of his injuries three weeks afterward, at New Utrecht. His wife, who was with him in his last moments, conveyed his body to Mastic, and there, in a secluded family cemetary, a short distance from his residence, his remains rest. A marble slab marks his grave, and bears the following inscription: 'In memory of General Nathaniel Woodhull, who, wounded and a prisoner, died on the twentieth of September, 1776, in the fifty-fourth year of his age; regretted by all who knew how to value his many private virtues, and that pure zeal for the rights of his country to which he perished a victim.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Woodhull's Grave

"Woodhull's Grave. Nathaniel Woodhull was born at Mastic, Long Island, December 30, 1722. Agriculture…

"Woodhull's Monument. This monument stands on the south side of the church. It is of white marble, about eight feet in height. The following is the inscription upon it: 'Sacred to the memory of the Reverend John Woodhull, D.D., who died Nov. 22d, 1824, aged 80 years. An able, faithful, and beloved minister of Jesus Christ. He preached the Gospel 56 years. He was settled first in Leacock, in Pennsylvania, and in 1779 removed to this congregation, which he served as pastor, with great diligence and success, for 45 years. Eminent as an instructor of youth, zealous for the glory of God, fervent and active in the discharge of all public and private duties, the labors of a long life have ended ina large reward.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Woodhull's Monument

"Woodhull's Monument. This monument stands on the south side of the church. It is of white marble, about…

The Monument marks the grave site of the bones of victims of the Wyoming Massacre, which took place on July 3, 1778. Local residents banded together to defend the area against an invasion of British Tories as well as pro-Tory Native Americans. The battle ended in defeat for the colonial fighters and considerable brutality followed the actual Battle. In 1833, the bones were reinterred in a vault under the present Monument. The monument is located in the borough of Wyoming, Pennsylvania.

The Wyoming Monument

The Monument marks the grave site of the bones of victims of the Wyoming Massacre, which took place…