This ClipArt gallery offers 242 illustrations of charges that would typically be seen in heraldry. A charge is any image, normally an animal, person, or plant, that is on the shield of a coat of arms.

"The Quatrefoil is a piercing or panel divided by cusps or foliations into four leaves, or more correctly the leaf-shaped figure formed by the cusps. The name is also given to flowers and leaves of a similar form carved as ornaments on moldings, etc. It differs from the cinquefoil only in the number of cusps."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Quatrefoil

"The Quatrefoil is a piercing or panel divided by cusps or foliations into four leaves, or more correctly…

"The quatrefoil is four-leaved grass; a frequent bearing in coat-armor."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Quatrefoil

"The quatrefoil is four-leaved grass; a frequent bearing in coat-armor."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart,…

The heraldic charge borne by the ninth eldest son in a family.

The Double Quatrefoil

The heraldic charge borne by the ninth eldest son in a family.

"Azure, a pale, or, radient. RADIENT. Any charge having rays or beams about it." -Hall, 1862

Radient

"Azure, a pale, or, radient. RADIENT. Any charge having rays or beams about it." -Hall, 1862

"Azure, a ray of the sun issuing out of the dexter corner of the escutcheon. The lines on each side are not noticed. RAY. A stream of light proceeding from a luminous body." -Hall, 1862

Ray of Sun

"Azure, a ray of the sun issuing out of the dexter corner of the escutcheon. The lines on each side…

"When the drops have their natural position inverted."—Aveling, 1891

Guttée Reversed

"When the drops have their natural position inverted."—Aveling, 1891

"Azure, a rose argent, barbed, and seeded proper. BARBED. Bearded. It is also applied to roses." -Hall, 1862

Rose Barbed

"Azure, a rose argent, barbed, and seeded proper. BARBED. Bearded. It is also applied to roses." -Hall,…

"Seventh Son, the ROSE. The differences used by armorists at the present time are nine in number. They not only distinguish the sons of one family, but also denote the subordinate degrees in each house." -Hall, 1862

Rose Difference

"Seventh Son, the ROSE. The differences used by armorists at the present time are nine in number. They…

The heraldic charge borne by the seventh eldest son in a family.

The Rose

The heraldic charge borne by the seventh eldest son in a family.

"Bezant, Or. BESANT, or BEZANT. Gold coin of Byzantium; when they appear in a coat of arms their colour is not described: a besant is always or." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Bezant

"Bezant, Or. BESANT, or BEZANT. Gold coin of Byzantium; when they appear in a coat of arms their colour…

"Golpe, purpure. GOLPS. Roundlets of a purple tincture. The colour is not stated, as the name denotes the colour." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Golpe

"Golpe, purpure. GOLPS. Roundlets of a purple tincture. The colour is not stated, as the name denotes…

"Guzes, sanguine. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory, the names of which are sufficient to denote their colour without expressing the same." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Guzes

"Guzes, sanguine. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in…

"Hurts, Azure. HURTS. Blue roundlets: the colour is expressed in the name; therefore the tincture is not otherwise named in emblazoning a coat of arms." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Hurts

"Hurts, Azure. HURTS. Blue roundlets: the colour is expressed in the name; therefore the tincture is…

"Orange, tenne. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory, the names of which are sufficient to denote their colour without expressing the same." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Orange

"Orange, tenne. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory,…

"Pellet, sable. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory, the names of which are sufficient to denote their colour without expressing the same." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Pellet

"Pellet, sable. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory,…

"Plate, Argent. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory, the names of which are sufficient to denote their colour without expressing the same." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Plate

"Plate, Argent. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory,…

"Pomeis, vert. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory, the names of which are sufficient to denote their colour without expressing the same." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Pomeis

"Pomeis, vert. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory,…

"Torteaux, gules. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in Armory, the names of which are sufficient to denote their colour without expressing the same." -Hall, 1862

Roundlet Torteaux

"Torteaux, gules. In addition to the foregoing tinctures, there are nine roundlets or balls used in…

"Or, three torteaux in bend. IN BEND. Figures placed in a slanting direction from the dexter chief to the sinister base are said to be in bend." -Hall, 1862

Roundlets in Bend

"Or, three torteaux in bend. IN BEND. Figures placed in a slanting direction from the dexter chief to…

"Five roundlets; two, one, two, in saltier. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Five Roundlets

"Five roundlets; two, one, two, in saltier. When there are many figures of the same species borne in…

"Five roundlets; one, three, one, or in cross. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Five Roundlets

"Five roundlets; one, three, one, or in cross. When there are many figures of the same species borne…

"Four roundlets, two over two. Some armorists call them cantoned as they form a square figure. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Four Roundlets

"Four roundlets, two over two. Some armorists call them cantoned as they form a square figure. When…

"Six roundlets; two, two, two, paleway. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Six Roundlets

"Six roundlets; two, two, two, paleway. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats…

"Six roundlets; three, two, one, in pile. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Six Roundlets

"Six roundlets; three, two, one, in pile. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats…

"Three roundlets, two over one; if the single roundlet had been at the top, it would have been called one over two. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Three Roundlets

"Three roundlets, two over one; if the single roundlet had been at the top, it would have been called…

"Three roundlets in bend. They might also be placed in fess, chief, base, or in pale. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Three Roundlets

"Three roundlets in bend. They might also be placed in fess, chief, base, or in pale. When there are…

"The two roundlets are arranged in pale, but they may appear in chief or base. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Two Roundlets

"The two roundlets are arranged in pale, but they may appear in chief or base. When there are many figures…

"The two roundlets are arranged in pale, but they may appear in ... fess. When there are many figures of the same species borne in coats of arms, their number must be observed as they stand, and properly expressed." -Hall, 1862

Two Roundlets

"The two roundlets are arranged in pale, but they may appear in ... fess. When there are many figures…

A heraldic field sprinkled with drops of blood.

Guttée du Sang

A heraldic field sprinkled with drops of blood.

"A griffin rampant, segreant, gules. SEGREANT. This term is used to describe a griffin displaying its wings as if about to fly." -Hall, 1862

Segreant

"A griffin rampant, segreant, gules. SEGREANT. This term is used to describe a griffin displaying its…

"When several charges appear in one shield, the number in each row is generally indicated - as, 'three, two, and one,' and these must be given in writing, not in figures; but when the numbers exceed six, they produce the appearance of a pattern, and the field so covered is said to be seméee with the charge in question."—Aveling, 1891

Shield Semée

"When several charges appear in one shield, the number in each row is generally indicated - as, 'three,…

"Argent, a serpent nowed proper. NOWED. This word signifies tied or knotted, and is applied to serpents, wiverns, or any animals whose tails are twisted and enfolded like a knot." -Hall, 1862

Serpent Nowed Proper

"Argent, a serpent nowed proper. NOWED. This word signifies tied or knotted, and is applied to serpents,…

"Argent, a serpent crowned, or, vorant a (person). VORANT. Swallowing or devouring: any animal, in a charge, devouring another creature." -Hall, 1862

Serpent Vorant

"Argent, a serpent crowned, or, vorant a (person). VORANT. Swallowing or devouring: any animal, in a…

"SET FOIL OR SIX FOIL. Six leaves conjoined in the centre." -Hall, 1862

Set Foil

"SET FOIL OR SIX FOIL. Six leaves conjoined in the centre." -Hall, 1862

"A description of cross, with the ends or extremities bent at right angles."—Avelin, 1891

Fylot Shield

"A description of cross, with the ends or extremities bent at right angles."—Avelin, 1891

"IMBUED. Weapons spotted with blood are said to be imbued. The example shows a spearhead imbued." -Hall, 1862

Spearhead Imbued

"IMBUED. Weapons spotted with blood are said to be imbued. The example shows a spearhead imbued." -Hall,…

"Argent, a stag at gaze proper. GAZE. An intent look. This is said of a deer standing still, and turning its head to look earnestly at any object." -Hall, 1862

Stag at Gaze

"Argent, a stag at gaze proper. GAZE. An intent look. This is said of a deer standing still, and turning…

"Argent, a stag lodged, proper, attired, or. ATTIRED. When the horns of a stag are of a different tincture to its head, it is said to be attired." -Hall, 1862

Stag Attired

"Argent, a stag lodged, proper, attired, or. ATTIRED. When the horns of a stag are of a different tincture…

"Argent, a stag's head caboshed, proper. CABOCHED or CABOSHED. Beasts' heads borne without any part of the neck, and full faced." -Hall, 1862

Stag Caboshed

"Argent, a stag's head caboshed, proper. CABOCHED or CABOSHED. Beasts' heads borne without any part…

"Argent, a stag proper courant. COURANT. Running." -Hall, 1862

Stag Courant

"Argent, a stag proper courant. COURANT. Running." -Hall, 1862

"LODGED. A stag sitting on the ground with its head erect, is said to be lodged." -Hall, 1862

Stag Lodged

"LODGED. A stag sitting on the ground with its head erect, is said to be lodged." -Hall, 1862

"Argent, a stag proper, tripping. TRIPPING. The motion of deer, between running and walking." -Hall, 1862

Stag Tripping

"Argent, a stag proper, tripping. TRIPPING. The motion of deer, between running and walking." -Hall,…

Hart at Gaze. The deer standing at gaze (facing the viewer) shows the statant guardant attitude of a beast in heraldry.

Statant Guardant

Hart at Gaze. The deer standing at gaze (facing the viewer) shows the statant guardant attitude of a…

"Azure, a sun in its splendour. SOL, or THE SUN IN ITS SPLENDOUR. The sun is said to be in its splendour when it is figured (that is, delineated with a human face) and surrounded with rays. Sometimes this figure is called a sun in its glory." -Hall, 1862

Sun in its Splendor

"Azure, a sun in its splendour. SOL, or THE SUN IN ITS SPLENDOUR. The sun is said to be in its splendour…

"A swan's head erased at the neck, ducally gorged or. GORGED. Any animals, particularly birds, that have collars round the neck, are said to be gorged." -Hall, 1862

Swan Gorged

"A swan's head erased at the neck, ducally gorged or. GORGED. Any animals, particularly birds, that…

"Argent, a sword proper couped, hilted or. HILTED. The handle of a sword tinctured." -Hall, 1862

Sword Hilted

"Argent, a sword proper couped, hilted or. HILTED. The handle of a sword tinctured." -Hall, 1862

"Gules, a sword erect in pale, argent, surmounted by two keys, saltier, or. SURMOUNTED. A figure or bearing having another over it." -Hall, 1862

Sword Surmounted by Keys

"Gules, a sword erect in pale, argent, surmounted by two keys, saltier, or. SURMOUNTED. A figure or…

"Argent, three swords in pile, their points towards the base. IN PILE. Arms or other charges that are placed so as to form the shape of a pile are said to be borne in pile." -Hall, 1862

Swords in Pile

"Argent, three swords in pile, their points towards the base. IN PILE. Arms or other charges that are…

"Argent, a talbot's head erased, semé of billets. TALBOT. A dog formerly used for hunting. It is formed something between a hound and a beagle, with a large snout, and long, round, thick ears." -Hall, 1862

Talbot

"Argent, a talbot's head erased, semé of billets. TALBOT. A dog formerly used for hunting. It…

"Argent, three torteaux in bend, sinister. TORTEAUX. Red roundlets." -Hall, 1862

Torteaux

"Argent, three torteaux in bend, sinister. TORTEAUX. Red roundlets." -Hall, 1862

"Gules, three towers embattled argent. BATTLEMENTS. Divisions or apertures on the top of castle walls or towers." -Hall, 1862

Towers Embattled

"Gules, three towers embattled argent. BATTLEMENTS. Divisions or apertures on the top of castle walls…

"Argent, a pile, azure, issuing from the chief between two others, transposed. TRANSPOSED. Charges or bearings placed contrary to their usual situation." -Hall, 1862

Transposed

"Argent, a pile, azure, issuing from the chief between two others, transposed. TRANSPOSED. Charges or…

"Argent, three trefoils, gules, one over two." -Hall, 1862

Trefoils

"Argent, three trefoils, gules, one over two." -Hall, 1862

"Vert, two triangles braced, argent. BRACED. Two figures of the same form, interlacing each other." -Hall, 1862

Triangles Braced

"Vert, two triangles braced, argent. BRACED. Two figures of the same form, interlacing each other."…

"TURRETED. A wall or castle having small turrets. In the annexed example the square tower has circular turrets at the angles, and is therefore said to be turreted." -Hall, 1862

Turreted

"TURRETED. A wall or castle having small turrets. In the annexed example the square tower has circular…

"Azure, three unicorns' heads proper, erased, horned or. HORNED. This term is used to denote that the horn of a unicorn is of a different tincture from his body." -Hall, 1862

Unicorns Horned

"Azure, three unicorns' heads proper, erased, horned or. HORNED. This term is used to denote that the…

"Argent, three dexter arms, vambraced, couped. VAMBRACED. Armour for the arms." -Hall, 1862

Vambraced

"Argent, three dexter arms, vambraced, couped. VAMBRACED. Armour for the arms." -Hall, 1862

"Vert, a bordure argent, verdoy, of trefoils. VERDOY. A bordure charged with eight leaves." -Hall, 1862

Verdoy

"Vert, a bordure argent, verdoy, of trefoils. VERDOY. A bordure charged with eight leaves." -Hall, 1862

Voided, in heraldry, a term applied to a charge or ordinary pierced through, or having the inner part cut away, so that the field appears, and nothing remains of the charge except its outer edges.

Voided Cross

Voided, in heraldry, a term applied to a charge or ordinary pierced through, or having the inner part…

"WINGS ERECT. Wings are called erect when their long feathers point upwards." -Hall, 1862

Wings Erect

"WINGS ERECT. Wings are called erect when their long feathers point upwards." -Hall, 1862