The Dual Sports ClipArt gallery offers 46 illustrations of sports and recreational events that have one person against another, such as boxing, fencing, or tennis.

A tennis player returning a ball using a backhand stroke.

Backhand

A tennis player returning a ball using a backhand stroke.

Two men on a bowling green.

Bowls

Two men on a bowling green.

Position of the boxer.

Boxing

Position of the boxer.

Left-hand blow for the face.

Boxing

Left-hand blow for the face.

Left-hand counter for the head with guard.

Boxing

Left-hand counter for the head with guard.

Right cross-counter for the head.

Boxing

Right cross-counter for the head.

Right-hand body blow.

Boxing

Right-hand body blow.

Landing a swinging left-hand blow for the head.

Boxing

Landing a swinging left-hand blow for the head.

Right-hand up-cut.

Boxing

Right-hand up-cut.

"Carte, Guard. Turn wrist with nails upwards; hand on a line with lower part of breast; arm somewhat bent, and elbow inclined a little to the outside; point of foil elevated at an angle of about 15 degrees, and directed at upper part of adversary's breast." — Chambers, 1881

Carte

"Carte, Guard. Turn wrist with nails upwards; hand on a line with lower part of breast; arm somewhat…

"Here is a new game, which is causing a great deal of amusement at social gatherings in Europe. Two boys, or young men, are blindfolded, and in the right hand of each is placed a stout roll of paper in the form of a club or cudgel. The players then have to lie down on the carpet and to grasp each other by the left hand. Thereupon the fun begins. One of the players asks the other, 'Are you there?' When the answer, 'Yes' comes he raises his right hand and strives to hit with his cudgel the spot where, from the sound of the voice, he supposes the other player's head to be. The other player, however, is at perfect liberty to move his head after he has answered 'Yes,' and the result is that in nine cases out of ten the blow misses his head and falls on his shoulders or some other part of his body. In that case it is his turn to retaliate, and so the game goes on indefinitely, the sole object of the player who asks the question being to strike the other player's head, and that of the player who answers to save his head from being struck."— Thomas Sheppard Meek

Cudgel Game

"Here is a new game, which is causing a great deal of amusement at social gatherings in Europe. Two…

Two men fencing.

Fencing

Two men fencing.

Diagram of a fencer's waist quartered to show the points of the body against which thrusts are aimed.

Fencing

Diagram of a fencer's waist quartered to show the points of the body against which thrusts are aimed.

Prime parry. The thrust <em>in prime</em> for the left side of the body is parried by the act of striking up the opponent's foil by lowering the point of the foil, the back of the hand toward the face, as shown in the right-hand figure.

Fencing

Prime parry. The thrust in prime for the left side of the body is parried by the act of striking…

Quarte parry. The thrust <em>in quarte</em> for the left side of the body, on the high lines, is parried by striking down to the left the opponent's foil by assuming the attitude shown in the left-hand figure.

Fencing

Quarte parry. The thrust in quarte for the left side of the body, on the high lines, is parried…

Tierce parry. The thrust <em>in tierce</em> for the right side of the body, on the high lines, is parried by raising the foil and striking the opponent's weapon to the right, as shown in the left-hand figure.

Fencing

Tierce parry. The thrust in tierce for the right side of the body, on the high lines, is parried…

Two men fencing.

Fencing

Two men fencing.

A tennis player returning a ball using a forehand stroke.

Forehand

A tennis player returning a ball using a forehand stroke.

A tennis player returning a ball using a half-volley stroke.

Half-volley

A tennis player returning a ball using a half-volley stroke.

Two boys playing handball

Handball

Two boys playing handball

"This game is played by means of seven pins, made so that they may either be driven into the ground or fixed on a board. Each pin is numbered, from one to seven. There is a slight cup at the top of the pins. In each cup is placed a small ball or marble. To play the game, six of the pins are fixed in a circle, with the seventh in the middle; and the players, standing at a given distance, take the wooden quoits with which they try to knock the balls out of the cups. Before playing, they must name the pin at which they aim, and if they strike off the ball belonging to any other pin, the score goes to the adversary. If, however, he knocks off the ball at which he aims, and by the same throw strikes off one or more besides, he may score them all. in another version of the game, if the player can strike off the seven balls and have one or more quoits to spare, he may try to throw the quoits so as to fall upon the pins, and for every case in which he succeeds he adds the number of the pin to his score."&mdash; Thomas Sheppard Meek

Lawn Cupolette

"This game is played by means of seven pins, made so that they may either be driven into the ground…

"Prime, Parade. In using prime to parry the thrust in seconde, pass your point over the adversary's blade, lower it to the waist, keeping your wrist as high as your mouth, nails downward, elbow bent, and body held back as far as possible. The left foot should also be drawn backward a few inches, to remove the body further from the hostile point." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Prime

"Prime, Parade. In using prime to parry the thrust in seconde, pass your point over the adversary's…

"Quinte, Parade. Wrist in high carte, sword-point low, and oppose adversary from the forte of the outside edge of your blade." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Quinte

"Quinte, Parade. Wrist in high carte, sword-point low, and oppose adversary from the forte of the outside…

A flattish ring of iron, used in playing a kind of game.

Quoit

A flattish ring of iron, used in playing a kind of game.

The instrument with which players at tennis and like games strike the ball with.

Racket

The instrument with which players at tennis and like games strike the ball with.

The instrument with which players at tennis and like games strike the ball with.

Racket

The instrument with which players at tennis and like games strike the ball with.

"Seconde, Parade. Nails and wrist downward, hand opposed outward, and blade, pointing low, should form an angle of about 45 degrees with the ground." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Seconde

"Seconde, Parade. Nails and wrist downward, hand opposed outward, and blade, pointing low, should form…

A tennis player serving the ball in to play.

Serving

A tennis player serving the ball in to play.

Adults playing lawn tennis near a house.

Tennis

Adults playing lawn tennis near a house.

Man demonstrating the underhand serve.

Tennis

Man demonstrating the underhand serve.

Man demonstrating the overhand serve.

Tennis

Man demonstrating the overhand serve.

Man demonstrating the foreward overhand stroke.

Tennis

Man demonstrating the foreward overhand stroke.

Man demonstrating the foreward underhand stroke.

Tennis

Man demonstrating the foreward underhand stroke.

A tennis player.

Tennis player

A tennis player.

A tennis racket.

Tennis Racket

A tennis racket.

A well-dressed woman playing tennis.

Tennis Woman

A well-dressed woman playing tennis.

"Tierce, Guard. As in carte, the nails and wrist being somewhat more downward, and the arm stretched a little outward, to cover the outside." &mdash; Chambers, 1881

Tierce

"Tierce, Guard. As in carte, the nails and wrist being somewhat more downward, and the arm stretched…

Wrestlers from an antique statue.

Wrestlers

Wrestlers from an antique statue.

Two men wrestling.

Wrestling

Two men wrestling.

The hold.

Wrestling

The hold.

The hank.

Wrestling

The hank.

The cross-buttock.

Wrestling

The cross-buttock.

The hip.

Wrestling

The hip.

The back-heal.

Wrestling

The back-heal.

The half-nelson.

Wrestling

The half-nelson.

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of union among the various branches of the Greek race, and in keeping alive a feeling of their common origin. They were open to all persons who could prove their Hellenic blood, and were frequented by spectators from all parts of the Grecian world. They were celebrated at Olympia, on the banks of the alpheus, in the territory of Elis." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Wrestling

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of…