This ClipArt gallery includes 165 illustrations related to the Commonwealth of Virginia. Views include Mount Vernon, Monticello, Montpelier, Oak Hill Plantation, Civil War sites, the state capitol, and other landmarks.

Color illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, and Rhode Island. This flag was in use from June 14, 1777 until May 1, 1795.

13 Star United States Flag, 1776

Color illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states of Delaware,…

Black line illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, and Rhode Island. This flag was in use from June 14, 1777 until May 1, 1795.

13 Star United States Flag, 1776

Black line illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states…

"The Apollo Room. The room used for public meetings is in the rear building of the old Raleigh tavern at Williamsburg, and up to the day of my visit it had remained unaltered. Carpenters were then at work remodeling its style, for the purpose of making it a ball-room; and now, I suppose, that apartment, hallowed by so many associations connected with our war for independence, has scarcely an original feature left. Had my visit been deferred a day longer, the style of the room could never have been portrayed. Neat wainscoting of Virginia pine ornamented the sides below and partly between the windows, and over the fire-place, which was spacious. This view is from the entrance door from the front portion of the building. On the left were two large windows; on the right were two windows and a door; and on each side of the fire-place was a door opening into small passage ways, from the exterior. Through the door on the left is seen a flight of stairs leading to the dormitory. The walls were whitewashed, and the wood-work painted a lead color. In this room the leading patriots of Virginia, including Washington, held many secret caucuses, and planned many schemes for the overthrow of royal rule in the colonies. The sound of the hammer and saw engaged in the work of change seemed to me like actual desecration; for the Raleigh tavern, and the Apollo room are to Virginia, relatively, what Faneuil Hall is to Massachusetts."—Lossing, 1851

Apollo Room

"The Apollo Room. The room used for public meetings is in the rear building of the old Raleigh tavern…

Raleigh Tavern in Williamsburg, Virginia, gained some fame in the pre-Revolutionary War Colony of Virginia as a gathering place for the Burgesses after several Royal Governors officially dissolved the House of Burgesses.

The Apollo Room in the Raleigh Tavern

Raleigh Tavern in Williamsburg, Virginia, gained some fame in the pre-Revolutionary War Colony of Virginia…

Men guarding Nathaniel Bacon's home during the Virginia Rebellion

Bacon

Men guarding Nathaniel Bacon's home during the Virginia Rebellion

Bacon Before the Virginia Council

Bacon Before the Virginia Council

Bacon Before the Virginia Council

The Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks Station was fought on May 31 and June 1, 1862 in Henrico County, Virginia as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the Civil War.

Battle of Fair Oaks

The Battle of Fair Oaks, also known as the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks Station was fought on…

"Engagement at Bealington, Va., between Ohio and Indiana regiments and a detachment of Georgia troops. On July 8th, 1861, from a high hill in the neighborhood of Bealington, two large bodies of troops were seen marching out of the Confederate camp. They advanced under cover of the wood, when the Federal skirmishers rushed at them. The confederate cavalry then appeared, and the skirmishers retreated, when the Federal regiments threw a couple of shells into the midst of the cavalry, who at once retired. The Ohio troops then sent another volley and several shells into the wood, which did so much execution among the Confederates that the officers could not rally them."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Bealington

"Engagement at Bealington, Va., between Ohio and Indiana regiments and a detachment of Georgia troops.…

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in the James River, a little above the bridge which connects the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad. It is about an acre and a half, and in this small space there were on an average ten thousand Federal soldiers imprisoned and slowly tortured. The Confederate capital has been so often described that we shall confine ourselves to the special view before us. The prominent building is the Capitol; the five churches on the left are St. Paul's, First Baptist, St. James's, Second Baptist and Grace Street Methodist; the large building at the end of the bridge is Haxall's flouring mill, the largest one of the kind in the world, being thirteen stories high."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Belle Isle

"View of Richmond, Va., from the prison camp at Belle Isle, James River. Belle Island is situated in…

On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred, about eight thousand acres (32 km²) on the north bank of the James River near Herring Creek in an area then known as Charles Cittie. It was about 20 miles upstream from Jamestown, where the first permanent settlement of the Colony of Virginia was established on May 14, 1607.

Berkeley, Virginia (Near Harrison's Landing)

On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred, about eight thousand…

"Surrender of British Standards at Yorktown."—Lossing, 1851

British Surrender

"Surrender of British Standards at Yorktown."—Lossing, 1851

The Southern Literary Messenger was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia, from 1834 until June 1864. Each issue carried a subtitle of "Devoted to Every Department of Literature and the Fine Arts" or some variation and included poetry, fiction, non-fiction, reviews, and historical notes. It was founded by Thomas Willis White who served as publisher and occasional editor until his death in 1843. White hired Edgar Allan Poe in 1835 as a staff writer and critic. Others involved with the periodical included Matthew Fontaine Maury and Maury's kinsman Benjamin Blake Minor. It ended in June 1864 in part due to Richmond's involvement in the American Civil War.

Southern Literary Messenger Building

The Southern Literary Messenger was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia, from 1834 until June…

The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major land battle of the American Civil War, fought on July 21, 1861, near Manassas, Virginia.

Battle of Bull Run

The First Battle of Bull Run, also known as the First Battle of Manassas, was the first major land battle…

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal batteries replying to the Confederate artillery, August 23rd, 1862, being the commencement of the battles ending at Bull Run, August 30th. Our correspondent reported as follows: "The fight was opened by our batteries in front of the hill and woods on the centre and left. It was immediately replid to by the enemy's batteries in the orchard and along the crest of the hill, about three-quarters of a mile distant. After the artillery fighting had lasted some time, our infantry attacked the enemy's left flank. The fighting, however, was very severe. Huge columns of yellow smoke rolled up from the roads. The faint rattle and roll of distant musketry came across the open fields, interrupted occasionally by the boom of a heavy gun. Meanwhile, the enemy was making a very serious attempt to turn our left. Part of General McDowell's corps was sent to drive them back. They moved in solid column across the field from the right, while the enemy in overpowering force was pushing our small number back. The fighting was terriblly fierce at this point, the enemy throwing all their force on this flank. Our men retired across the field in the foreground and into the woods. On the right the enemy was driven from its position." —Leslie, 1896

Commencement of Bull Run

"The Confederate forces under General Jackson advancing upon the Rapphannock Station at the river. Federal…

The First Battle of Bull Run is also known as the First Battle of Manassas and was the first major land battle of the Civil War fought on July 21, 1861 near Manassas, Virginia. Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell advanced his Union Army troops across Bull Run against the Confederate Army under Brig. Gens. Joseph E. Johnston and P.G.T. Buearegard. The Union was forced to retreat back to Washington, D.C.

First Battle of Bull Run

The First Battle of Bull Run is also known as the First Battle of Manassas and was the first major land…

Picture of the Confederate Capitol, the Virginia State House.

Confederate Capitol

Picture of the Confederate Capitol, the Virginia State House.

The Battle of Cedar Creek, or The Battle of Belle Grove, October 19, 1864, was one of the final, and most decisive, battles in the Valley Campaigns of 1864 during the American Civil War.

View at Cedar Creek Battle-ground

The Battle of Cedar Creek, or The Battle of Belle Grove, October 19, 1864, was one of the final, and…

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by General Banks and the Confederate Army led by Generals Jackson, Ewell, Winder, etc.- final repulse of the Confederates. General Pope's report of the battle is as follows: "On Saturday, August 9th, 1862, the enemy advanced rapidly to Cedar Mountain, the sides of which they occupied in heavy force. General Banks was instructed to take up his position on the ground occupied by Crawford's brigade, of his command, which had been thrown out the day previous to observe the enemy's movements. He was directed not to advance beyond that point, and if attacked by the enemy to defend his position and send back timely notice. The artillery of the enemy was opened early in the afternoon, but he made no advance until nearly five o'clock, at which time a few skirmishers were thrown forward on each side under cover of the heavy wood in which his force was concealed. The enemy pushed forward a strong force in the rear of his skirmishers, and General Banks advanced to the attack. The engagement did not fairly open until after six o'clock, and for an hour and a half was furious and unceasing. I arrived personally on the field at 7 P.M., and found the action raging furiously. The infantry fire was incessant and severe. I found General Banks holding the position he took up early in the morning. His losses were heavy. Ricketts's division was immediately pushed forward and occupied the right of General Banks, the brigades of Crawford and Gordon being directed to change their position from the right and mass themselves in the centre. Before this change could be effected it was quite dark, though the artillery fire continued at short range without intermission. The artillery fire, at night, by the Second and Fifth Maine batteries in Ricketts's division of General McDowell's corps was most destructive, as was readily observable the next morning in the dead men and horses and broken gun carriages of the enemy's batteries which had been advanced against it. Our troops rested on their arms during the night in line of battle, the heavy shelling being kept up on both sides until midnight. At daylight the next morning the enemy fell back two miles from our front, and still higher up the mountain."" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Battle of Cedar Mountain, fought Saturday, August 9th, 1862, between the Federal troops commanded by…

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862. As soon as the order to advance was given the brigade moved forward, until it came to the open field, in perfect silence. As soon as it was clear from the woods, with a cheer that could have been heard all over the battle ground, it took the double-quick, and though at every step its ranks grew thinner from the murderous fire through which it passed, yet there was no faltering, no hesitancy; onward, across the field, up the slope and into and through the woods it went, until it met the second line of the enemy's overpowering forces. Forced at last to yield to overwhelming odds, it retired over the ground gained at such a frightful cost until it reached the cover from which it started. Here what remained held their position until the third brigade could come to its support. When exhausted, cut to pieces, its officers all gone, with no one to direct it, those who survived gathered as fast as thy could, and in the morning all that was left of that brigade was less than seven hundred men." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"Gordon's and Crawford's Brigades driving the Confederate forces from the woods at the Battle of Cedar…

"The Confederate batteries shelling the Federal position on the night of the Battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9th, 1862- wounded men lying on the ground, McDowell's division marching on the field. The scene at night was very striking. It was past ten o'clock, and there was a bright moonlight and a clear blue sky. The Federal troops were on a rising ground, while the enemy's batteries were shelling from the woods, the Federal batteries replying, and one by one driving them further back. The hospital was near the Federal position, and wounded men wre lying on the ground, waiting their turn to receive surgical attention. Near them were groups of stragglers, ambulances, ammunition wagons, etc." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Cedar Mountain

"The Confederate batteries shelling the Federal position on the night of the Battle of Cedar Mountain,…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., Friday, May 1st, 1863. We give a fine sketch of the point where the memorable battle of Chancellorsville began. It was at the junction of the Gordonsville Plank Road, the Old Turnpike, and the road from Ely's and United States stores. The first fighting took place here on Friday, May 1st, and on Saturday the Eleventh Corps was routed, and the enemy repulsed by consummate generalship and the most resolute bravery of the Federal troops. Here, too, on Sunday the enemy made an attack with such overhwhelming force as to force the Federal army back to the second line. Few spots possess greater interest than this scene of fearful battle."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va., Friday, May 1st, 1863. We give a fine sketch of the point where the…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. Attack on General Sedgwick's Corps. on Monday, May 4th, 1863, at 5 P.M., as seen from Falmouth Heights. After General Sedgwick had carried the fortifications on Sunday, May 3rd, he pushed along the Gordonsville Plank Road in pursuit till night stopped his advance. Before morning the enemy threw a heavy force in his rear, cutting him off from his small force at Fredericksburg on the rear, and began to mass troops on his front and left flank. About half-past five o'clock in the afternoon they began the attack, and columns poured from behind the breastworks and marched down the hill to the plain above the town and opposite Falmouth, receiving, as they came in range, a brisk fire from the Federal artillery beyond the river. Unchecked by this, however, they rushed on Sedgwick's line, which repeatedly repulsed them, falling back, however, gradually to Banks's Ford, which they crossed in the morning on pontoons. In the sketch the breastworks captured on Sunday are seen, with the Confederates passing between them and the river in columns to attack Sedgwick's troops, which are the continuous line in the distance."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Va. Attack on General Sedgwick's Corps. on Monday, May 4th, 1863, at 5…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy. Early on May 3rd, Stuart renewed the attack upon Hooker's force, with the battle cry, 'Charge and remember Jackson!' and the advance was made with such impetuosity that in a short time he was in possession of the crest from which the Eleventh Corps had been driven the preceding day. No time was lost in crowning that eminence with all the heavy artillery obtainable, and as soon as this could be made to play upon the Federal lines a charge was successively ordered upon the position held by Generals Berry and French, both of whom were supported by the divisions of Williams and Whipple. After a severe struggle the Confederates succeeded in capturing the high ground where the Federals had posted some more heavy artillery, and in turning the latter upon the Federals, who soon had to fall back to their second and third lines of intrenchments. The Confederates followed close upon them, and made charge after charge in order to capture the new positions, but unayailingly and when re-enforcements arrived from Meade's corps they were forced to abadon the attack."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Chancellorsville

"Battle of Chancellorsville, Sunday, May 3rd, 1863. General Hooker repulsing the attack of the enemy.…

Soldiers marching to Chancellorsville Virginia. The Battle of Chancellorsville was a seven day battle between Robert E. Lee and Joseph Hooker. It was considered Lee's "perfect battle" due to his risky decision to divide his army despite those of his rival's to be much bigger. It resulted in an important Confederate victory.

March to Chancellorsville

Soldiers marching to Chancellorsville Virginia. The Battle of Chancellorsville was a seven day battle…

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler, detaching itself from General Slocum's division and rushing to the support of the General Kearny's division, which had been driven back, thus turning the fortunes of the day, June 30th, 1862, six o'clock p.m." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Charles City

"Battle of Charles City Road- charge of the Jersey Brigade- the first New Jersey brigade, General Tayler,…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the battles between the Federal forces commanded by General McClellan and the Confederate armies led by Generals Lee, Jackson, Magruder and Longstreet. About two o'clock in the afternoon, June 26th, 1862, the Confederates were seen advancing in large force across the Chickahominy, near the railroad, close the Mechanicsville, where General McCall's division was encamped. Placing their batteries in the rear of the Federals, the Confederates commenced a steady fire. The Federal batteries replied, and very soon the roar of the artillery was deafening. For three hours the fight raged with great fierceness, the enemy attempting a flank movement, which was defeated. Toward six o'clock in the evening General Morell's division arrived on the ground, and marched straight on the enemy, in spite of the shower of shot and shell rained upon them." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Valley of Chickahominy

"Valley of the Chickahominy, looking southeast from the vicinity of Mechanicsville, the scene of the…

St. John's Church in Virginia overlooking a cemetery.

St. John's Church

St. John's Church in Virginia overlooking a cemetery.

"An outdoor classroom at Williamsburg, Virginia. When the children becoem tired indoors, classes are taken to this building for a recitation. There were only 20 days during the winter of 1911-1912 on which this outdor classroom was not used." — Ritchie, 1918

Outdoor classroom

"An outdoor classroom at Williamsburg, Virginia. When the children becoem tired indoors, classes are…

The Colonial Seal of Virginia.

Colonial Virginia

The Colonial Seal of Virginia.

"The Confederate Prison camp at Belle Isle, James River, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Prison Camp

"The Confederate Prison camp at Belle Isle, James River, Va."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Cornwallis surrender

"The surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon and Colonel Dumont, after the battle. After the Confederates had crossed the fourth ford General Garnett again endeavored to rally his men, standing waving his hand on an exposed point near the river bank, by his side only one young man (Chaplet), wearing the uniform of the Georgia Sharpshooters. Three of Dumont's men fired at the same time, and Garnett and his companion fell at the first round. The men rushed across, and on turning the body discovered that the Confederate leader of Western Virginia had paid the penalty; he was shot through the heart. Major Gordon, U.S.A., closed his eyes reverently, and Colonel Dumont, coming up, had him carried into a grove close by, where they laid him down, taking care of his sword and watch, to be sent with his body to his family." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Corrick's Ford

"Battle of Carrick's Ford, Western Virginia- discovery of the body of General Garnett, by Major Gordon…

Craney Island is a point of land in the independent city of Portsmouth in the South Hampton Roads region of eastern Virginia in the United States. The location, formerly in Norfolk County, is near the mouth of the Elizabeth River opposite Lambert's Point on Hampton Roads.

The Block-House in Craney Island, 1813

Craney Island is a point of land in the independent city of Portsmouth in the South Hampton Roads region…

The home of Jefferson Davis in Richmond, Virginia.

Jefferson Davis's Home in Richmond

The home of Jefferson Davis in Richmond, Virginia.

Virginia Confederacy Envelope (5 cent) from 1861

Virginia Confederacy Five Cent Envelope, 1861

Virginia Confederacy Envelope (5 cent) from 1861

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages from home. It is only those who had relatives in camp that could tell the feverish anxiety of the troops to hear from those they had left at home. We need hardly describe a scene which so thoroughly explains itself. The name of Adams Express was a household one, both to the donor and receiver of good things sent to the absent soldier." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Adams Express

"Scene in Adams Express office, at Fortress Monroe, VA., in 1861- Volunteers receiving letters and packages…

"Federal Cavalry Leaders. Generals Pleasonton, Bayard and Colonel Percy Wyndham making a reconnoissance, near Fredericksburg, Va. Our sketch of Generals Pleasonton, Bayard and Colonel Percy Wyndham makes a truly brilliant group. Having previously given the biography of Generals Pleasonton and Bayard, we need only mention Colonel Wyndham. Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, a well-known English officer, entered the cavalry service of his country at a very early age. He has seen service in the Crimea and India. He became one of Garibaldi's staff in 1859, and was with him all through his campaign around Como and in the Tyrol and Brescia. He also was with him during his famous campaign of 1860, and was present from Magenta to Volturno and Gaeta. At the commencement of the war of the rebellion in 1861, he offered his services to the Federal Government, and was appointed to the colonelcy of the First Regiment of New Jersey cavalry, with which he served with distinction."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal cavalry leaders

"Federal Cavalry Leaders. Generals Pleasonton, Bayard and Colonel Percy Wyndham making a reconnoissance,…

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts crossing the Rappahannock in advance of the Grand Army, to drive off the Confederate riflemen who were firing upon the Federal pontioniers, Wednesday, December 10th, 1862. We illustrate one of those numerous acts of daring which have raised the character of the Federal soldier to the highest position in the military world. When the fire of the enemy from the rifle pits on the south side of the Rappahannock became so deadly that the pontoniers could not carry on their work, General Burnside called for 100 volunteers to cross and dislodge, at the bayonet's point, the concealed sharpshooters. Thousands sprang forward, but only the number required was chosen. These consisted of men from the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiments. With the utmost alacrity this gallant 'forlorn hope' sprang into the boats, and, on reaching the other side, drove the Confederates from their posts at the point of the bayonet, capturing 39 prisoners. Only one man was killed and give wounded in this desperate duty. The bridge was soon finished, and a sufficient force passed over to hold the town."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Forlorn Hope

"'The Forlorn Hope.' Volunteers storming party, consisting of portions of the Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth…

"Section of Fort Runyon, Va., guarding the road to Alexandria, occupied by the Twenty-first Regiment, New York Volunteers, August 1861. For Runyon, named after the commander of the New Jersey Regiments which were formerly stationed there, entirely commanded the road to Alexandria. Our sketch shows the battery erected on this important point. The spot was a most picturesque one, commanding a splendid view all around, the background being the Potomac and Washington." —Leslie, 1896

Fort Runyon

"Section of Fort Runyon, Va., guarding the road to Alexandria, occupied by the Twenty-first Regiment,…

Fredericksburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia located 50 miles south of Washington, D.C., and 58 miles north of Richmond. As of the 2000 census, the city had a population of 19,279. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the city of Fredericksburg with neighboring Spotsylvania County for statistical purposes. It is a part of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Fredericksburg, VA

Fredericksburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia located 50 miles south of Washington,…

An illustration of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Fredericksburg, Virginia

An illustration of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

An illustration of George Washington's grave.

George Washington's Grave

An illustration of George Washington's grave.

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan before Yorktown, April 26th, 1862. On the morning of Saturday, April 26th, 1862, Company H of the first Massachusetts Volunteers, led by Camptain Carruth, made a most brilliant charge on a Confederate redoubt, and took it at the point of the bayonet. It was defended by a company of the First Virginia Regiment, who fought with that Old Dominion valor which, to use a phrase probably heard before, "was worthy of a better cause." The Federals were exposed to a most galling fire from the instant they left the shelter of the woods until they reached the brink of the deep ditch fronting the parapet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Company H

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan…

Hanover County Courthouse is the place where Patrick Henry practiced law and argued the case accusing King George III of tyranny in overturning colonial law without regard to the wishes of his subjects.

Hanover Courthouse

Hanover County Courthouse is the place where Patrick Henry practiced law and argued the case accusing…

A brick building, where a battle would later take place.

Hanover Courthouse, Virginia

A brick building, where a battle would later take place.

Harpers Ferry is a historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia. It is located at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers where the United States of Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia meet. It is best known for John Brown's raid on the Armory in 1859 and its role in the Civil War.

Harpers Ferry

Harpers Ferry is a historic town in Jefferson County, West Virginia. It is located at the confluence…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General Stonewall Jackson's Confederate Army, stronly posted in the woods, near Harrisonburg, Friday, June 6th, 1862. We illustrate one of the most heroic actions of the war, the attack of the famous Bucktails, under their gallant leader, Colonel Krane, upon a large portion of Stonewall Jackson's army, consisting of infantry, cavalry and artillery. The spot where this deadly conflict took place was about a mile and a half beyond Harrisonburg, on the road to Port Republic, toward which place the Confederates were in full retreat, closely but warily pursued by Generals Fremont and Shields. On Friday, June 6th, Colonel Sir Percy Wyndham, of the First New Jersey Cavalry, having been sent by General Bayard to reconnoitre, was led into an ambuscade, where his regiment was fearfully cut up, and himself wounded and taken prisoner. It will be seen that the humanity of Colonel Krane led him into a similar trap. News of what had occurred was rapidly transmitted to headquarters, and General Bayard was ordered out with fresh cavalry and a battalion of Pennsylvania Bucktails. But the Sixtieth Ohio had already beaten back the bold Confederates. The evening was waxing late; General Fremont did not wish to bring on a general engagement at this hour, and the troops were ordered back. "But do not leave poor Wyndham on the field, and all the wounded," remonstrated brave Colonel Krane of the Bucktails. "Let me at 'em, general, with my Bucktails." "Just forty minutes I'll give you, colonel," said General Bayard, pulling out his watch. "Peep through the woods on our left, see what is in there, and out again when the time is up." In go the 150 at an opening in the pines; they were soon surrounded by a cordon of fire flashing from the muzzles of more than a thousand muskets; but not a sign, nor the shadow of a sign, of yielding. Their fire met the enemy's straight and unyielding as the blade of a matador. Oh for re-enforcements! But none came. The brave Bucktails were forcd to retreat across the fields of waving green, firing as they did so- but not the 150 that went in. The rest lie under the arching dome of the treacherous forest." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Attack at Harrisonburg

"Gallant attack by 150 of the Pennsylvania Bucktails, led by Colonel Kane, upon a portion of General…

Patrick Henry making his great speech.

Patrick Henry

Patrick Henry making his great speech.

A drawing of Virginia Convention in 1775, at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia, when Patrick Henry said his famous speech, "Give me liberty or give me death."

Henry, Patrick, Give me liberty or give me death!

A drawing of Virginia Convention in 1775, at St. John's Church in Richmond, Virginia, when Patrick Henry…

"The war in Virginia- hospital scene after the Battle of Bristoe Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Hospital

"The war in Virginia- hospital scene after the Battle of Bristoe Station."— Frank Leslie, 1896

A house of burgesses in Williamsburg, Virginia.

House of Burgesses

A house of burgesses in Williamsburg, Virginia.