This ClipArt gallery includes 155 illustrations related to the Commonwealth of Virginia. Views include Mount Vernon, Monticello, Montpelier, Oak Hill Plantation, Civil War sites, the state capitol, and other landmarks.

"Jamestown is now an island, for the sandy beach which once connected it with the mainland has disappeared. Only the ruins of the brick church erected in 1639 and some of the tombs in the churchyard remain."—Webster, 1920

Ruins at the Brick Church at Jamestown

"Jamestown is now an island, for the sandy beach which once connected it with the mainland has disappeared.…

"Down past the mouth of York River, where the French ships were blockading Cornwallis, into James River, and up the James to Jamestown, sailed the ships from Elkton, landing on the 25th, and marching to Williamstown."—Coffin, 1879

The Landing at Jamestown

"Down past the mouth of York River, where the French ships were blockading Cornwallis, into James River,…

A depiction of the bedroom where Thomas Jefferson died in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Bedroom in Which Jefferson Died

A depiction of the bedroom where Thomas Jefferson died in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The grave of Thomas Jefferson in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Thomas Jefferson's Grave

The grave of Thomas Jefferson in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The home of General Charles Lee of the American Revolution.

Charles Lee's House

The home of General Charles Lee of the American Revolution.

Loading tobacco in Virginia

Loading Tobacco

Loading tobacco in Virginia

An illustration of soldiers guarding Long Bridge in Arlington, Virginia.

Soldiers Guarding Long Bridge

An illustration of soldiers guarding Long Bridge in Arlington, Virginia.

The surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

Lord Cornwallis

The surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

"View from Loudon Heights, Va., showing Harper's Ferry, Maryland Heights, Bolivar, etc. Harper's Ferry, immortalized by the pen of Jefferson, became too often the scene of stirring events during the Civil War to require a long description, and we give a fine engraving of it to enable our readers to understand fully the operations that took place there. The view shows Maryland Heights, and on the other side Harper's Ferry, with the railroad and pontoon bridges. The place in the foreground is Bolivar, and the river runs in the gorge between it and Maryland Heights. This sketch was made by an artist who spent several days examining the neighborhood so as to give the best possible view of a point deemed so strategically important."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Loudon Heights

"View from Loudon Heights, Va., showing Harper's Ferry, Maryland Heights, Bolivar, etc. Harper's Ferry,…

Lynnhaven Bay is a relatively small body of water in Virginia separated from the rest of the Chesapeake Bay by a small inlet.

Lynnhaven Bay, Virginia

Lynnhaven Bay is a relatively small body of water in Virginia separated from the rest of the Chesapeake…

The burial place of President James Madison in Montpelier, Virginia.

Tomb of President Madison

The burial place of President James Madison in Montpelier, Virginia.

Montpelier was the estate of James Madison, fourth President of the United States.

Montpelier: The Home of James Madison

Montpelier was the estate of James Madison, fourth President of the United States.

The old magazine at Williamsburg

The Old Magazine at Williamsburg

The old magazine at Williamsburg

Monument in the memory of Mary Washington at Fredericksburg, VA. Mary Ball Washington (1708 – 1789) was the mother of George Washington. Mary Ball met Augustine Washington and they married in 1730. Together, Mary and Augustine had six children.

Mary Washington Monument

Monument in the memory of Mary Washington at Fredericksburg, VA. Mary Ball Washington (1708 –…

Martin's Massachusetts Battery C opening fire on the Confederate fortifications commanding the approaches to Yorktown, April 5th, 1862.

Massachusetts Battery

Martin's Massachusetts Battery C opening fire on the Confederate fortifications commanding the approaches…

The residence of President James Monroe in Oak Hill, Virginia.

Monroe's Residence at Oak Hill, VA

The residence of President James Monroe in Oak Hill, Virginia.

The tomb of President James Monroe in Richmond, Virginia.

Tomb of President Monroe

The tomb of President James Monroe in Richmond, Virginia.

The tomb of the fifth President of the United States, James Monroe. His grave is at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.

Tomb of Monroe

The tomb of the fifth President of the United States, James Monroe. His grave is at Hollywood Cemetery…

"Monticello, Governor Jefferson's place of retirement. This venerated mansion is yet standing, though somewhat dilapidated and deprived of its former beauty by neglect. The furniture of its distinguished owner is nearly all gone, except a few pictures and mirrors, otherwise the interior of the house is the same as when Jefferson died. It is upon an eminence, with many aspen-trees around it, and commands a view of the Blue Ridge for one hundred and fifty miles on one side, and on the other one of the most beautiful and extensive landscapes in the world. Wirt, writing of the interior arrangements of the house during Mr. Jefferson's life time, records that, in the spacious and lofty hall which opens to the visitor on entering, 'he marks no tawdry and unmeaning ornaments; but before, on the right, on the left, all around, the eye is struck and gratified by objects of science and taste, so classed and arranged as to produce their finest effect."—Lossing, 1851

Monticello

"Monticello, Governor Jefferson's place of retirement. This venerated mansion is yet standing, though…

A view of Monticello in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Monticello

A view of Monticello in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Thomas Jefferson's estate near Charlottesville, Virginia.

Monticello

Thomas Jefferson's estate near Charlottesville, Virginia.

Monticello was Thomas Jefferson's estate in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was built in 1809 and appeared on the nickel and the two dollar bill.

Monticello, Jefferson's Estate

Monticello was Thomas Jefferson's estate in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was built in 1809 and appeared…

Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal author of the United States Declaration of Independence, the third President of the United States.

Monticello, Jefferson's Home

Monticello, located near Charlottesville, Virginia, was the estate of Thomas Jefferson, the principal…

Montpelier was James Madison's estate in Orange, Virginia. It was built in 1724.

Montpelier, Madison's Estate

Montpelier was James Madison's estate in Orange, Virginia. It was built in 1724.

View of Mount Vernon, home of George Washington

Mount Vernon

View of Mount Vernon, home of George Washington

A view of Mount Vernon in George Washington's time.

Mount Vernon

A view of Mount Vernon in George Washington's time.

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the…

Mount Vernon, the home and burial place of George Washington, situated in Fairfax county, Virginia, on the Potomac River, about fifteen miles below Washington. Several thousand acres of land were included in the original estate.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, the home and burial place of George Washington, situated in Fairfax county, Virginia,…

Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington.

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington.

An illustration of Mount Vernon which is located near what is now Alexandria, Virginia. Mt. Vernon was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architecture style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mount Vernon

An illustration of Mount Vernon which is located near what is now Alexandria, Virginia. Mt. Vernon was…

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mount Vernon in Washington's Day

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the…

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The mansion is built of wood in neoclassical Georgian architectural style, and the estate is located on the banks of the Potomac River.

Mt. Vernon

Mount Vernon, located near Alexandria, Virginia, was the plantation home of the first President of the…

Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek has carved a gorge of the limestone forming an arch 215 ft high with a span of 90 ft.

The Natural Bridge in Virginia

Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek has carved…

Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek (a small tributary of the James River) has carved out a gorge in the mountainous limestone terrain, forming an arch 215 ft (66 m) high with a span of 90 ft (27 m).

Natural Bridge, Virginia

Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County, Virginia is a geological formation in which Cedar Creek (a small…

"The Nelson Tombs. This view is from the burial-ground looking down the York River toward Chesapeake Bay. The inscription upon the first monument is in Latin; the following is a translation of it: 'Here lies, in certain hope of a resurrection in Christ, Thomas Nelson, gentleman, son of Hugo and Sarah Nelson, of Penrith, in the county of Cumberland; born February 20th, A. D. 1677, died October 7th, 1745, aged sixty-eight years.' The inscription upon the second monument is much longer, and quite eulogistic. William Nelson was president of his majesty's council in Virginia, and died on the nineteenth of November, 1772, at the age of sixty-one years. No epitaph tells of the many virtues and heroic deeds of him who lies in the obscure vault beyond. History has written them upon the enduring pages of the chronicles of our republic; and in this work his biography and portrait may be found among those of the signers of the Delcaration of Independence."—Lossing, 1851

Nelson Tombs

"The Nelson Tombs. This view is from the burial-ground looking down the York River toward Chesapeake…

"Camp of the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment in the woods, one mile from the Confederate fortifications, Yorktown, VA., April 10th, 1862. On the 5th of April, 1862, the Federal advance neared the centre of the Confederate position, and found that its fortifications commanded the approach to Yorktown. It was here that Captain Martin's Massachusetts battery opened upon the enemy's forts and made several splendid shots. The Confederates returned the fire, killing a Federal gunner; a second shot wounded another, and a third killed one and wounded two more. The excellence of this practice immediately convinced Captain Martin that he had unfortunately placed his battery in front of a Confederate target. He consequently withdrew to the camp in the woods. The scene our artist has sketched is about one mile from Yorktown, and is in that part of the peninsula where it is only eight miles from river to river." —Leslie, 1896

Camp of Ninth Massachusetts

"Camp of the Ninth Massachusetts Regiment in the woods, one mile from the Confederate fortifications,…

Oak Hill Plantation was James Monroe's estate in Loudoun County, Virginia. It was built for the fifth U.S. president in 1808.

Oak Hill Plantation, Monroe's Estate

Oak Hill Plantation was James Monroe's estate in Loudoun County, Virginia. It was built for the fifth…

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is a representation of the officers' tents of the Jersey City Zouave Company, acting as guard of honor to General Runyon." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Officer's tents

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"The campaign on the James River- General Butler landing at Fort Pawhatan."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Pawhatan

"The campaign on the James River- General Butler landing at Fort Pawhatan."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Pohick was the first permanent church in the colony to be established north of the Occoquan River, sometime prior to 1724. Originally called "the Occoquan Church," it was soon referred to as "Pohick Church" because of its proximity to Pohick Creek. George Washington's map of the area locates this long-lost wooden edifice near a site now occupied by Cranford Methodist Church.

Pohick Church

Pohick was the first permanent church in the colony to be established north of the Occoquan River, sometime…

"Advance of the Army of the Potomac. Occupation of Winchester, VA., and the abandoned Confederate Fortifications, by a detachment of General Banks's Deivision of the Federal Army, consisting of the brigades of Generals Hamilton and Williams, March 12th, 1862. Our sketch represents the advance of the Federal troops upon the City of Winchester, and is thus described by our correspondent: 'A portion of General Banks's Division, under General Gorman, occupied the town of Berryville, VA., on the 11th. There were five hundred of the Confederate cavalry in the place, but upon the Third New York Cavalry, properly supported by artillery and infantry, charging them, they fled in confusion toward Winchester. During the night the pickets of General Gorman came in contact with a portion of Colonel Ashby's Confederate cavalry, and were compelled to fall back, but the general made a reconnoissance in force to within two miles of Winchester, and, charging upon the Confederates dispersed them, taking several prisoners, and killing or wounding four of the Confederates. This reconnoissance sealed the fate of Winchester. The enemy were blinded and misled by the movement of our troops, and they commenced the evacuation of the place on the afternoon of the 12th. General Hamilton advanced from Bunker hill, the Michigan Cavalry heading the column. The Confederate Cavalry, one thousand two hundred strong, and supported by a section of artillery, gave battle at five o'clock in the afternoon. Our cavalry was supported by the First maryland Infantry, and a battery of artillery. The fight was a short one. The Confederates fled, leaving their guns behind them, and at daylight on the 12th our troops entered the city as the rear guard of the enemy was flying out of it.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Army of the Potomac

"Advance of the Army of the Potomac. Occupation of Winchester, VA., and the abandoned Confederate Fortifications,…

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is of Camp Princeton, taken from the intenchments constructed by the brigade at the junction of the Alexandria and Columbia Roads." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Camp Princeton

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

American soldiers retreating across the Rappahannock river in Northwest Virginia. It shows an example of a ford, which is a place in a river or other body of water where it is shallow enough for people to cross.

Rappahannock River

American soldiers retreating across the Rappahannock river in Northwest Virginia. It shows an example…

In 1863, president Lincoln reviewed some sixty thousand troops in the small town of Falmouth VA. Although no battles were fought there, many soldiers crossed through this area to get to the Potomac River and to Fredericksburg just southeast of the town.

Lincoln Review

In 1863, president Lincoln reviewed some sixty thousand troops in the small town of Falmouth VA. Although…

This illustration shows the capital building for the state of Virginia. It can be found in the city of Richmond.

Richmond State Capitol

This illustration shows the capital building for the state of Virginia. It can be found in the city…

A sketch of Richmond, Virginia from 1861 during the Civil War.

Richmond Virginia in 1861

A sketch of Richmond, Virginia from 1861 during the Civil War.

Roanoke Island was the site of the 16th century Roanoke Colony, the first English colony in the New World in what was then called Virginia, in honor of England's ruling monarch, Queen Elizabeth I.

Roanoke Island

Roanoke Island was the site of the 16th century Roanoke Colony, the first English colony in the New…

John White finds the only clue to the disappearance of the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke: a tree carved with the word 'Croatan,' the name of a Native American tribe.

Croatan Carved into Tree at Roanoke

John White finds the only clue to the disappearance of the "Lost Colony" of Roanoke: a tree carved with…

"The war in Virginia- Roemer's Battery, Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, shelling Petersburg. Our readers will be able to study the siege of Petersburg in our illustrations as they did that of Vicksburg. It is one of those cases where pictorial illustration has an advantage over mere verbal accounts. Here we see the Thirty-fourth New York Battery (Roemer's) and the Seventh Maine (Twitchell's), of Wilcox's Third Division of Burnside's Ninth Army Corps, shelling the city of Petersburg itself as it stands in full sight, and less than three miles off."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Roemer's Battery

"The war in Virginia- Roemer's Battery, Third Division, Ninth Army Corps, shelling Petersburg. Our readers…

"Engagement at Romney, VA., twenty miles from New Creek, Tuesday, June 11th, 1861- the Eleventh Indiana Zouaves crossing the bridge over the Potomac, at double quick time, to attack the Confederate forces. On Tuesday, June 11th, 1861, Colonel Lewis Wallace, in command of the Eleventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Zouaves, stationed at Cumberland, Md., received orders to attack the Confederates assembled at Romney, the capital of Hampshire County, Va. He took six hundred men and left the same evening, reaching New Creek Bridge, twenty-eight miles by rail from Cumberland, at eleven o'clock P.M. Colonel Wallace reached the neighborhood of Romney about eight o'clock A.M., and was not surprised to find that the enemy had got the alarm, there having been time enough for horsemen to give warning. Picket guards had been placed on the eights commanding the road, at a distance of about one mile and a half from the town. These fired their pieces at the advance of the Zouaves, and as the fire was promptly and effectually returned, they immediately withdrew. The Zouaves entered Romney at half-past eight o'clock A.M., in time to partake of the breakfast which had been prepared for the "evacuates."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

Engagement at Romney

"Engagement at Romney, VA., twenty miles from New Creek, Tuesday, June 11th, 1861- the Eleventh Indiana…

"The sarcophagus of Washington. This was placed in the family vault in the autumn of 1837."—Lossing, 1851

Sarcophagus of Washington

"The sarcophagus of Washington. This was placed in the family vault in the autumn of 1837."—Lossing,…

"Picture of an Indian village drawn by John White in 1585 and incorporated in a report to Sir Walter Raleigh."—Stephenson, 1913

The Towne of Secota

"Picture of an Indian village drawn by John White in 1585 and incorporated in a report to Sir Walter…

"Federal signal station on Loudoun Heights, Harper's Ferry, communicating with the station on Maryland Heights."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Signal Station

"Federal signal station on Loudoun Heights, Harper's Ferry, communicating with the station on Maryland…

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the Powhatan Native American tribe.

Smith Subduing Powhatan

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the…

Captain Sir John Smith (c. January 1580–June 21, 1631) Admiral of New England was an English soldier, sailor, and author. He is remembered for his role in establishing the first permanent English settlement in North America at Jamestown, Virginia.

Smith's Escape from Slavery

Captain Sir John Smith (c. January 1580–June 21, 1631) Admiral of New England was an English soldier,…

Pocahontas saving Captain John Smith's life.

Smith's Life

Pocahontas saving Captain John Smith's life.

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the Powhatan Native American tribe.

Smith's Meeting with Powhatan

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the…

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

St. John's Church in Hampton, Virginia.

St. John's Church

St. John's Church in Hampton, Virginia.

The historical St. John's Church, Richmond.

St. John's Church

The historical St. John's Church, Richmond.