This ClipArt gallery includes 165 illustrations related to the Commonwealth of Virginia. Views include Mount Vernon, Monticello, Montpelier, Oak Hill Plantation, Civil War sites, the state capitol, and other landmarks.

"Picture of an Indian village drawn by John White in 1585 and incorporated in a report to Sir Walter Raleigh."—Stephenson, 1913

The Towne of Secota

"Picture of an Indian village drawn by John White in 1585 and incorporated in a report to Sir Walter…

"Federal signal station on Loudoun Heights, Harper's Ferry, communicating with the station on Maryland Heights."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Signal Station

"Federal signal station on Loudoun Heights, Harper's Ferry, communicating with the station on Maryland…

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the Powhatan Native American tribe.

Smith Subduing Powhatan

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the…

Captain Sir John Smith (c. January 1580–June 21, 1631) Admiral of New England was an English soldier, sailor, and author. He is remembered for his role in establishing the first permanent English settlement in North America at Jamestown, Virginia.

Smith's Escape from Slavery

Captain Sir John Smith (c. January 1580–June 21, 1631) Admiral of New England was an English soldier,…

Pocahontas saving Captain John Smith's life.

Smith's Life

Pocahontas saving Captain John Smith's life.

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the Powhatan Native American tribe.

Smith's Meeting with Powhatan

The meeting between Capt. John Smith, founder of the Virginia colony, and Powhatan, the chief of the…

An eminent explorer and founder of Virginia, born in Willoughby, England, in January, 1579; died in London, June 21, 1632.

John Smith

An eminent explorer and founder of Virginia, born in Willoughby, England, in January, 1579; died in…

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

St. John's Church in Hampton, Virginia.

St. John's Church

St. John's Church in Hampton, Virginia.

The historical St. John's Church, Richmond.

St. John's Church

The historical St. John's Church, Richmond.

St. John's Episcopal Church is the oldest church in Richmond, built in 1741 and giving its name to the Church Hill district. St. John's was formed from several earlier churches. It was the site of two important conventions in the period leading to the American Revolutionary War, and is most famous as the location where Patrick Henry gave his closing speech at the Second Virginia Convention with the famous quotation "Give me liberty or give me death."

St. John's Church

St. John's Episcopal Church is the oldest church in Richmond, built in 1741 and giving its name to the…

Virginia Confederacy Stamp (5 cent) from 1861

Virginia Confederacy Five Cent Stamp, 1861

Virginia Confederacy Stamp (5 cent) from 1861

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850) was an American military leader and the twelfth President of the United States. Known as "Old Rough and Ready", Taylor had a 40-year military career in the U.S. Army, serving in the War of 1812, Black Hawk War, and Second Seminole War before achieving fame leading U.S. troops to victory at several critical battles of the Mexican-American War. A Southern slaveholder who opposed the spread of slavery to the territories, he was uninterested in politics but was recruited by the Whig Party as their nominee in the 1848 presidential election.

Zachary Taylor's Residence at Baton Rouge

Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850) was an American military leader and the twelfth…

The lost colony of Roanoke.

The Lost Colony

The lost colony of Roanoke.

Tobacco being harvested in the Virginia Colony. By 1612, John Rolfe's new strains of tobacco had been successfully cultivated and exported. Finally, a cash crop to export had been identified, and plantations and new outposts sprung up, initially both upriver and downriver along the navigable portion of the James River, and thereafter along the other rivers and waterways of the area.

Tobacco Cultivation in Colonial Virginia

Tobacco being harvested in the Virginia Colony. By 1612, John Rolfe's new strains of tobacco had been…

A farmer tending his tobacco plants.

Tobacco Plants

A farmer tending his tobacco plants.

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1875

Virginia seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1875

The official seal of the U.S. state of Virginia in 1889.

Virginia

The official seal of the U.S. state of Virginia in 1889.

The seal of the state of Virginia.

Virginia

The seal of the state of Virginia.

The state banner of Virginia, the old dominion.

Virginia

The state banner of Virginia, the old dominion.

Patrick Henry in the Virginia Assembly.

Virginia Assembly

Patrick Henry in the Virginia Assembly.

A man and his son hunting in the mountains of Virginia.

Virginia Mountaineers in Colonial Times

A man and his son hunting in the mountains of Virginia.

"Great Seal of Virginia."—Lossing, 1851

Virginia Seal

"Great Seal of Virginia."—Lossing, 1851

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1876

Virginia Seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1876

Virginia Seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1890

Virginia Seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1890

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1904

Virginia Seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Virginia, 1904

The Seal of Virginia. The seal shows a Virtus standing over the defeated Tyranny with his fallen crown. Underneath them reads, 'Sic Semper Tyrannis' whiich means "Thus Always to Tyrants."

Seal of Virginia

The Seal of Virginia. The seal shows a Virtus standing over the defeated Tyranny with his fallen crown.…

The Colonial Seal of Virginia. An Indian kneels before a prominent royal figure.

Colonial Seal of Virginia

The Colonial Seal of Virginia. An Indian kneels before a prominent royal figure.

" In Rockbridge County, Virginia, is to be found one of the greatest curiosities in the United States, a natural bridge. This bridge consists of a stupendous arch of limestone rock, over a chasm fifty feet wide dat its base and ninety feet at the top."- Lupton

Natural Bridge in Virginia

" In Rockbridge County, Virginia, is to be found one of the greatest curiosities in the United States,…

An early view of the University of Virginia.

University of Virginia

An early view of the University of Virginia.

An illustration of George Washington lighting a cannon at the siege of Yorktown.

George Washington at Siege of Yorktown

An illustration of George Washington lighting a cannon at the siege of Yorktown.

Washington's grave, Mount Vernon.

Washington's Grave

Washington's grave, Mount Vernon.

The Capitol Building in West Virginia.

West Virginia Capitol Building

The Capitol Building in West Virginia.

Westover Plantation is located on the north bank of the James River in Charles City County, Virginia. It is located on State Route 5, a scenic byway which runs between the independent cities of Richmond and Williamsburg. It is a US National Historic Landmark. Westover Plantation was formerly claimed to have been built circa 1730 by William Byrd II, the founder of Richmond; this date appears in the 1960 designation of the house as a National Historic Landmark. However, recent dendrochronologic testing on boards and planks in the house shows that they actually date to the 1750s, and this is the date of construction now recognized by the National Park Service. Therefore the house was probably built by William Byrd III, not his father William Byrd II. The house is noteworthy for its secret passages, magnificent gardens, and architectural details. The grounds and garden are open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, but the house is not open to the public.

Westover Plantation

Westover Plantation is located on the north bank of the James River in Charles City County, Virginia.…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking the advance of the Confederates. After the battle of Savage's Station the Federals continued on their retreat, and by eight o'clock on the morning of June 30th, 1862, they had crossed White Oak Swamp and Creek, after destroying the bridge over the latter and warding off the repeated attacks to which they were subjected throughout the night. After crossing White Oak Creek the Federals had quickly formed a new line of battle at Willis Church, General Hancock's forces being on the extreme right, while Porter's occupied the left, and Heintzelman's and Sumner's the intervening space. Jackson's advance was checked by the destruction of the bridge, and when he reached the creek, at about noon, he found the approaches well defended by artillery. Jackson opened upon Hancock's troops, and made repeated efforts to rebuild the bridge under cover of his heavy artillery, but he was every time repulsed. While this was going on Longstreet and Hill had come upon a Federal force at a place two miles away, called Frazier's Farm. Here stood Sumner and Hooker, on the extreme right, McCall somewhat in advance toward the centre and Kearny on the extreme left. When Longstreet found this force arrayed against him he waited for re-enforcements to come up, and it was four o'clock when he commenced the attack. McCall's left was first assailed by Kenper's brigade, which was met by the Pennsylvania Reserves under Colonel Simmons, who, after a bitter conflict, drove the Confederates into the woods with a loss of 250 killed and wounded and about 200 prisoners. Fresh troops then enabled the Confederates to drive back the Federals, who in turn lost heavily. Longstreet and Hill now pressed on, and the conflict became a severe one along the entire front. One point, then another, was vainly tried in the determined effort to break the Federal line. At length Wilcox's Alabama Brigade rushed across an open field upon McCall's left, directly against Randall's battery, which centered upon the Confederates a most galling fire. Nothing daunted, they moved on, and finally engaging in a desperate hand-to-hand fight, first captured Cooper's battery, and afterward Randall's battery, which had been doing such terrible execution. A charge was then ordered for the recapture of the guns. The Confederates bravely met the severe attacks that followed. A still more desperate hand-to-hand struggle took place for the possession of the lost batteries, which were finally recaptured. By dark the Confederates had retired into the woods, and the Federals remained on that portion of the field which they had lost earlier in the action. The Federal loss was about 1,800 killed and wounded, whilst that of the Confederates was over 2,000. Colonel Simmons and General Meade were both severely wounded, while General McCall was a made prisoner." —Leslie, 1896

Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge

"Battle of White Oak Swamp Bridge, Monday June 30th, 1862- Ayres's, Mott's and Randall's batteries checking…

William and Mary College, Virginia

William and Mary College, Virginia

William and Mary College, Virginia

The College of William and Mary is a public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. It is the second-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and is one of the original eight institutions known as Public Ivies. William & Mary educated U.S. Presidents Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and John Tyler as well as other key figures important to the development of the nation, including U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall, Speaker of the House Henry Clay and 16 signers of the Declaration of Independence. W&M educated future MIT founder William Barton Rogers. U.S. President George Washington received his surveyor's certificate there and noted legal scholar George Wythe was both an early student and, later, the first head of W&M's law school.

William and Mary College (1723)

The College of William and Mary is a public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States.…

The old capitol building at Williamsburg, Virginia

Old Capitol at Williamsburg

The old capitol building at Williamsburg, Virginia

Washington at Yorktown.

Yorktown

Washington at Yorktown.

Yorktown was the base of British General Charles Cornwallis during the 1781 siege, which was the last major battle of the American Revolutionary War. The Yorktown Victory Monument commemorates the victory, the alliance with France that brought it about and the resulting peace with England.

The Yorktown Monument

Yorktown was the base of British General Charles Cornwallis during the 1781 siege, which was the last…