This ClipArt gallery offers 95 illustrations of Renaissance architecture. Renaissance architecture is noted as the time between the 15th and 17th century where the revival of ancient Greek and Roman elements emerged.

The Corinthian pilaster capital is an Italian Renaissance design found in the portal of San Michele in Venice. This pilaster is broader in proportion to its height.

Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Corinthian pilaster capital is an Italian Renaissance design found in the portal of San Michele…

The Corinthian pilaster capital is an Italian Renaissance design found in the Palace of the Doges in Venice, Italy. This pilaster is broader in proportion to its height and is encircled with palmette leaves, and spiral scroll like ornaments.

Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Corinthian pilaster capital is an Italian Renaissance design found in the Palace of the Doges in…

The Corinthian pilaster capital is an Italian Renaissance design found in the Palace of the Doges in Venice, Italy. This pilaster is broader in proportion to its height and is encircled with palmette leaves, and spiral scroll like ornaments.

Corinthian Pilaster Capital

The Corinthian pilaster capital is an Italian Renaissance design found in the Palace of the Doges in…

The Ionic pilaster capital is a French Renaissance design. This pilaster is broader in proportion to its height and has large volutes of spiral scroll like ornaments.

Ionic Pilaster Capital

The Ionic pilaster capital is a French Renaissance design. This pilaster is broader in proportion to…

The Palazzo Pitti, in English sometimes called the Pitti Palace, is a vast mainly Renaissance palace in Florence, Italy. It is situated on the south side of the River Arno, a short distance from the Ponte Vecchio. The core of the present palazzo dates from 1458 and was originally the town residence of Luca Pitti, an ambitious Florentine banker.The palace was bought by the Medici family in 1549 and became the chief residence of the ruling families of the Grand Duchy of Tuscany. It grew as a great treasure house as later generations amassed paintings, plates, jewelry and luxurious possessions.In the late 18th century, the palazzo was used as a power base by Napoleon, and later served for a brief period as the principal royal palace of the newly united Italy. The palace and its contents were donated to the Italian people by King Victor Emmanuel III in 1919, and its doors were opened to the public as one of Florence's largest art galleries. Today, it houses several minor collections in addition to those of the Medici family, and is fully open to the public."Columns, pilasters, and mouldings are intermingled and intertwined in a fantastic and meaningless manner, the cornices are often interrupted; the essentially component parts of the architecture are frequently mutilated; for instance, columns and wall-pilasters are executed in rustic work, i. e., formed of extensively projecting hewn stones, yet are furnished with a capital and base as is shown [in this image], which is an illustration taken from the Late Italian Renaissance. For the sake of peculiarity, the various component elements assumed a form diametrically opposed to their original designation; mere decorative and secondary details were raised to the rank of essentials, whilst the real principal forms sank to an entirely subordinate position."

Part of the Back of the Pitti Palace at Florence

The Palazzo Pitti, in English sometimes called the Pitti Palace, is a vast mainly Renaissance palace…

This is a plan of the St Paul's Cathedral in London, England. It is an example of English Renaissance architecture. The construction lasted from 1675 to 1710. Sir Christopher Wren designed the cathedral. "In plan, Wren's design was in accordance with the traditional arrangement of an English cathedral, with nave, north and south transepts and choir, in all the cases with side aisles together...Wren introduced a series of cupolas over the main arms of the cathedral, which enabled him to light with clerestory windows; these are not visible on the exterior, as they are masked by the upper storey which Wren carried round the whole structure, in order, probably, to give it greater height and importance." The scale is given in feet.

Plan of St Paul's Cathedral, London, 1675–1710

This is a plan of the St Paul's Cathedral in London, England. It is an example of English Renaissance…

This is a plan of the St Peter's at Rome. It is an example of Italian Renaissance architecture. The construction lasted from 1546 to 1564AD. "In 1505, on the advise of Michelangelo, Bramante was instructed to prepare designs for a new church in Rome dedicated to St Peter, to take the place of the early basilica, which, built in haste, began to show serious signs of failure [...] In 1546 Michelangelo, then seventy–two years of age, was entrusted with the continuance of the work, and he made radical changes, chiefly in the design of the dome. "

Plan of St Peter's at Rome, 1546–1564

This is a plan of the St Peter's at Rome. It is an example of Italian Renaissance architecture. The…

Palazzo Farnese is a prominent High Renaissance palace in Rome, which currently houses the French Embassy in Italy."The pupils of Bramante and other renowned architects pursued the path which he had marked out; as, for example, Balthazar Peruzzi (1481 to 1536) as the principle of his works may be mentioned the Farnesia at Rome; Ant. di Sangallo of Florence (died 1546), whose principle work is the Farnese Palace at Rome. The third story of this palace is, however, the work of Michel-Angelo. The Farnese Palace forms to a certain extent the type of distinct class in the architecture of Roman palaces, and its chief characteristic is, that the façades are not divided by any orders of columns or pilasters, but the same effect and impression are produced by the architraves, cornices, and plinths of the windows, which invariably have rectilineal terminations, as well as the doors, and also by the string-courses which divide the storeys, and by a far-projecting cornice: at the same time especial consideration is devoted to the effect of good proportions. Ornaments are by sparingly introduced; whilst, on the other hand, the corners are generally marked by rustications.These palaces convey the impression of solidity without cumbersomeness, or richness without luxury, and above all, of simplicity in conjunction with dignity."

Farnese Palace at Rome

Palazzo Farnese is a prominent High Renaissance palace in Rome, which currently houses the French Embassy…

The Villa Farnese, also known as Palazzo Farnese or Villa Caprarola, is a mansion in the town of Caprarola in the province of Viterbo, Northern Lazio, Italy, approximately 50 kilometres (35 miles) north-west of Rome.The Villa Farnese is a massive Renaissance construction begun in the early 1520s by Antonio da Sangallo, opening to the Monte Cimini, a range of densely wooded volcanic hills. It has a five-sided plant, and is built in reddish gold stone; buttresses support the piano nobile above, with two floors above again housing an almost complete two-story villa in itself. As a centerpiece of the vast Farnese holdings, it has always been more than a villa in the ordinary agricultural or pleasure senses."Another school, which displays a still stricter imitation of classical forms than that of which Bramante was the founder, was represented and advocated by Giacomo Barozzio, who is known under the name of Vignola (1507- 1573). This architect, by his works and his great influence on his contemporaries and successors, and the effect of his example is, like Palladio's, to be traced not only in the architectural bias of his own times, but also in the course of history of the eighteenth century. This result was principally brought about by means of his book on the five columnar orders of antiquity, and this treatise has been regarded as an authority down to the latest times. His most noteworthy construction is the Castle of Caprarola, between Rome and Viterbo."

Farnese Palace at Rome

The Villa Farnese, also known as Palazzo Farnese or Villa Caprarola, is a mansion in the town of Caprarola…

"The decoration of the interiors of the buildings of the Renaissance is also copied from ancient Roman architecture. The rooms are either vaulted or have flat ceilings, but in both cases are adorned with paintings after the manner of those discovered in the Baths of Titus, as is shown in [this image], or by panel-work, that is, sunken coffers with a regularly distributed enrichment. These panels are themselves often adorned with historical or allegorical paintings, or with arabesques. Ornamented panels were employed in large palaces for horizontal ceilings, as also in churches, though in the latter case they were more often applied to cupola vaulting, as notable in St. Peter's."

Painted Vault of the Florentine Palace in Rome

"The decoration of the interiors of the buildings of the Renaissance is also copied from ancient Roman…

"The most remarkable productions of Bramante at Rome are the Cancelleria Palace, with the Church of San Lorenzo in Damaso contained within its precincts, the Giraud Palace, now the Torlonia, and the Court of the Vatican, with the celebrated Loggie, decorated by Raphael."The Giraud Palace, known today as the Palazzo Castellesi Giraud Torlonia, was built in the 16th century for Cardinal Adriano Cestellesi. The palace was later owned by Giraud and finally by Torlonia.

Giraud Palace at Rome

"The most remarkable productions of Bramante at Rome are the Cancelleria Palace, with the Church of…

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his example necessarily entailed imitation and produced effects on subsequent times. When his deviations were moderate, they were considered by his imitators merely as marks of the originality of his wonderful talent, and by this means proved stepping-stones to the degeneration which marked the ensuing period of the Roccoco style. Amongst his architectural works, the design of the Capitol at Rome, with its wings, may be considered as the most pleasing, whilst as a testimony to his lofty genius the mighty and glorious dome of St. Peter's at Rome, which has no rival in the world, must be adducted as a striking instance."

Modern Capital at Rome

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his…

"The pupils of Bramante and other renowned architects pursued the path which he had marked out; as, for example, Balthazar Peruzzi (1481 to 1536) as the principle of his works may be mentioned the Farnesia at Rome;"

Small Palace at Rome by Balthazar Peruzzi

"The pupils of Bramante and other renowned architects pursued the path which he had marked out; as,…

"Besides the walls and ceilings of the interior, the façades were frequently decorated with sculptured figures, and the flat spaces between the windows and mouldings underwent ornamentation. This took place either by a manner of painting called sgraffito, in which the undercoating was black, with a thin surface-coating of white laid over it, and then the design or shading was engraved or scraped away down to the black grounding; or similar designs were executed in base-relief, whilst [this image] represents part of a façade painted in sgraffito."

Façade painted in Sgraffito at Rome

"Besides the walls and ceilings of the interior, the façades were frequently decorated with sculptured…

"Besides the walls and ceilings of the interior, the façades were frequently decorated with sculptured figures, and the flat spaces between the windows and mouldings underwent ornamentation. This took place either by a manner of painting called sgraffito, in which the undercoating was black, with a thin surface-coating of white laid over it, and then the design or shading was engraved or scraped away down to the black grounding; or similar designs were executed in base-relief, as is shown"The Palazzo Spada is a palace in Rome that houses a grand art collection, the Galleria Spada. The collection was originally assembled by Cardinal Bernardino Spada in the 17th century and added to by his grand-nephew Cardinal Fabrizio Spada (1643-1717), and by Virginio Spada (1596-1662).

Part of the Façade of the Spada Palace in Rome

"Besides the walls and ceilings of the interior, the façades were frequently decorated with sculptured…

St. Peter's, Rome is considered it's own city.

Rome, St. Peter's

St. Peter's, Rome is considered it's own city.

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his example necessarily entailed imitation and produced effects on subsequent times. When his deviations were moderate, they were considered by his imitators merely as marks of the originality of his wonderful talent, and by this means proved stepping-stones to the degeneration which marked the ensuing period of the Roccoco style. Amongst his architectural works, the design of the Capitol at Rome, with its wings, may be considered as the most pleasing, whilst as a testimony to his lofty genius the mighty and glorious dome of St. Peter's at Rome, which has no rival in the world, must be adducted as a striking instance. This dome was only completed after Michel-Angelo's death. Both as regards its colossal dimensions, as well as its beautiful proportions and lines, it produces, both internally and externally, a most wonderful impression. It should be remarkable that Michel-Angelo, like Bramante before him, selected the form of the Greek cross for his church, and planned the dome accordingly, and that the nave, which is by Carlo Maderno, is, both externally and internally, prejudicial to the effect of the dome."The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter (Latin: Basilica Sancti Petri), officially known in Italian as the Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly known as St. Peter's Basilica, is located within the Vatican City. St. Peter's has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world, holding 60,000 people. It is regarded as one of the holiest Christian sites and has been described as "holding a unique position in the Christian world" and as "the greatest of all churches of Christendom". In Catholic tradition, it is the burial site of its namesake Saint Peter, who was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, according to tradition, first Bishop of Rome and therefore first in the line of the papal succession.

Section of the Dome of St. Peter's, Rome

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his…

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his example necessarily entailed imitation and produced effects on subsequent times. When his deviations were moderate, they were considered by his imitators merely as marks of the originality of his wonderful talent, and by this means proved stepping-stones to the degeneration which marked the ensuing period of the Roccoco style. Amongst his architectural works, the design of the Capitol at Rome, with its wings, may be considered as the most pleasing, whilst as a testimony to his lofty genius the mighty and glorious dome of St. Peter's at Rome, which has no rival in the world, must be adducted as a striking instance. This dome was only completed after Michel-Angelo's death. Both as regards its colossal dimensions, as well as its beautiful proportions and lines, it produces, both internally and externally, a most wonderful impression. It should be remarkable that Michel-Angelo, like Bramante before him, selected the form of the Greek cross for his church, and planned the dome accordingly, and that the nave, which is by Carlo Maderno, is, both externally and internally, prejudicial to the effect of the dome."The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter (Latin: Basilica Sancti Petri), officially known in Italian as the Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly known as St. Peter's Basilica, is located within the Vatican City. St. Peter's has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world, holding 60,000 people. It is regarded as one of the holiest Christian sites and has been described as "holding a unique position in the Christian world" and as "the greatest of all churches of Christendom". In Catholic tradition, it is the burial site of its namesake Saint Peter, who was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, according to tradition, first Bishop of Rome and therefore first in the line of the papal succession.

Ground-plan of St. Peter's, Rome

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his…

"The decoration of the interiors of the buildings of the Renaissance is also copied from ancient Roman architecture. The rooms are either vaulted or have flat ceilings, but in both cases are adorned with paintings after the manner of those discovered in the Baths of Titus, or by panel-work, that is, sunken coffers with a regularly distributed enrichment [shown here]. These panels are themselves often adorned with historical or allegorical paintings, or with arabesques. Ornamented panels were employed in large palaces for horizontal ceilings, as also in churches, though in the latter case they were more often applied to cupola vaulting, as notable in St. Peter's."

Interior View of St. Peter's at Rome

"The decoration of the interiors of the buildings of the Renaissance is also copied from ancient Roman…

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his example necessarily entailed imitation and produced effects on subsequent times. When his deviations were moderate, they were considered by his imitators merely as marks of the originality of his wonderful talent, and by this means proved stepping-stones to the degeneration which marked the ensuing period of the Roccoco style. Amongst his architectural works, the design of the Capitol at Rome, with its wings, may be considered as the most pleasing, whilst as a testimony to his lofty genius the mighty and glorious dome of St. Peter's at Rome, which has no rival in the world, must be adducted as a striking instance. This dome was only completed after Michel-Angelo's death. Both as regards its colossal dimensions, as well as its beautiful proportions and lines, it produces, both internally and externally, a most wonderful impression. It should be remarkable that Michel-Angelo, like Bramante before him, selected the form of the Greek cross for his church, and planned the dome accordingly, and that the nave, which is by Carlo Maderno, is, both externally and internally, prejudicial to the effect of the dome."The Papal Basilica of Saint Peter (Latin: Basilica Sancti Petri), officially known in Italian as the Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano and commonly known as St. Peter's Basilica, is located within the Vatican City. St. Peter's has the largest interior of any Christian church in the world, holding 60,000 people. It is regarded as one of the holiest Christian sites and has been described as "holding a unique position in the Christian world" and as "the greatest of all churches of Christendom". In Catholic tradition, it is the burial site of its namesake Saint Peter, who was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus and, according to tradition, first Bishop of Rome and therefore first in the line of the papal succession.

Back View of St. Peter's, Rome

"Michel-Angelo assumed such considerable and prominent position by his genius and authority, that his…

This image "presents a type of the majority of the palaces if the Roman Renaissance style, at least so far as regards the architectural features and their arrangement; for the most important palaces in this style are both more imposing by their great length, whilst at the same time they are less simple and less correct in their details."The Verospi Palace, or The Palazzo Verospi, is located on the main street in Rome, the Via Del Corso.

Verospi Palace, Rome

This image "presents a type of the majority of the palaces if the Roman Renaissance style, at least…

"The creations of Alberti form a class apart in Florentine palace architecture, for they do not display the peculiarities of the Florentine style, but rather accommodating the forms of the antique to more modern requirements, they pointed out the road which was followed by the Roman Renaissance style, especially at the commencement of the sixteenth century. As will be seen from (this image,) these buildings are, to a certain extent, free from medièval sympathies, and approach more closely to the classical models."

Rucellai Palace

"The creations of Alberti form a class apart in Florentine palace architecture, for they do not display…

"Rustication was first treated systematically by the architects of the Renaissance in Tuscany, especially in Florence." -Whitney, 1911

Rustication

"Rustication was first treated systematically by the architects of the Renaissance in Tuscany, especially…

"A method of decoration is peculiar to these buildings which appears to have been borrowed from Byzantine models. Fine marbles of various colors, of which red porphyry and green serpentine are the most frequent, are inserted in circular and angular panels and borderings, and form a sort of mosaic-work. This style of ornamentation is employed both in churches and palaces, and gives a peculiarly rich and elegant appearance to the façades. Another peculiarity which was borrowed from the Byzantine style consists in the employment of semi-circular gables, both in churches, as in the case of the Santa Maria dei Miracoli, and also in public places, of which the Scuola di San Marco is a brilliant example."

Scuola di San Marco

"A method of decoration is peculiar to these buildings which appears to have been borrowed from Byzantine…

St Paul's Cathedral is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from the 17th century and is generally reckoned to be London's fifth St Paul's Cathedral, although the number is higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral. The cathedral sits on the highest point of the City of London, which originated as a Roman trading post situated on the River Thames. The cathedral is one of London's most visited sights.

St. Paul's London

St Paul's Cathedral is the Anglican cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of…

St. Peter's and the Vatican palace in Italy is the largest church in the world.

St. Peter's and the Vatican Palace

St. Peter's and the Vatican palace in Italy is the largest church in the world.

This is a drawing of the interior of the St. Peter's Basilica located in the Vatican city of Rome, Italy. The interior space of the church was designed by Giovanni Paolo Panini an Italian painter and architect. The interior space is the largest interior of any Christian church in the world.

Interior of St. Peter's Basilica

This is a drawing of the interior of the St. Peter's Basilica located in the Vatican city of Rome, Italy.…

Georges d'Amboise (1460 – May 25, 1510) was a French Roman Catholic cardinal and minister of state. He belonged to the house of Amboise, a noble family possessed of considerable influence: of his nine brothers, four were bishops. His father, Pierre d'Amboise, seigneur de Chaumont, was chamberlain to Charles VII and Louis XI and ambassador at Rome. Georges' eldest brother, Charles, was governor of the île-de-France, Champagne and Burgundy, and councillor of Louis XI.This image "represents a characteristic specimen of French Renaissance decoration".

Tomb of Cardinal d'Amboise at Rouen

Georges d'Amboise (1460 – May 25, 1510) was a French Roman Catholic cardinal and minister of state.…

The Musée du Louvre or officially the Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or Great Louvre, or simply the Louvre — is the national museum of France, the most visited museum in the world, and a historic monument. It is a central landmark of Paris, located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the 1st arrondissement (neighborhood). Nearly 35,000 objects from the 6th century BC to the 19th century are exhibited over an area of 60,600 square meters (652,300 square feet).The three prominent architects, Pierre Lescot (1510-1578), who desiged the celebrated Western Façade of the Louvre, Philibert Delorme and Jean Buillant, who was the architect of the earlier portions of the Tuileries [shown here], and of the Château d'Ecouen, exerted such an influence over the architecture of their native country that the Italian Renaissance Style became thenceforward the predominant one in France."

Façade of the Tuileries

The Musée du Louvre or officially the Grand Louvre — in English, the Louvre Museum or Great…

"A more determined imitation of Roman architecture is subsequently perceptible in the productions of San Michele during the first half of the sixteenth century. The conceptions of this architect had a considerable influence on his contemporaries and successors, and display a certain independence and originality."The Palazzo Grimani di San Luca is a Renaissance building in Venice, Italy. It is located on the Rio di San Luca channel of the city, at the point in which it flows into the Canal Grande.The palace was built in the mid-16th century for procurator Gerolamo Grimani by architect Michele Sanmicheli, and completed after his death by Gian Giacomo de' Grigi, known as "il Bergamasco".

Grimani Palace at Venice

"A more determined imitation of Roman architecture is subsequently perceptible in the productions of…

"Next in order are the productions of Jacopo Tatti, or Sansovino, who was born in 1479, and died in 1570. This architect was educated in the Florentine school, and afterwards proceeded to Rome; his masterpieces are less powerful and imposing but on the other hand, are more graceful, and display more richly developed details than those of San Michele."The Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana is a library and Renaissance building in Venice, northern Italy; it is one of the earliest surviving public manuscript depositories in the country, holding one of the greatest classical texts collections in the world. The library is named after St. Mark, the patron saint of Venice.

Old Liberty of St. Mark at Venice

"Next in order are the productions of Jacopo Tatti, or Sansovino, who was born in 1479, and died in…

"More than one cause served to render the compositions of Palladio so celebrated. He possessed an especial felicity in the arrangement of his ground-plans, particularly in instances where he had an unlimited space for disposal. His command, moreover, of good proportion , rendered his combinations of civic and sacred buildings most pleasing to the eye; whilst the columnar arrangement of his entrances conveyed an agreeable, and at the same time, dignified impression. Consequently the works of Palladio, although often composed of heterogeneous elements, remained for a long period the model for an entire style; and even in the eighteenth century, when the total deterioration of architecture, as exemplified in what is called by the Germans "the Zopf-und-Perrücken Styl" (pigtail and periwig style), led architects again in the direction of the classical, the designs of Palladio became anew a subject of study. Even in present day they are often immoderately praised by those who are not really conversant with the principles and requirements of art, and who are ignorant of the history of the development of architecture."Il Redentore, more properly Chiesa del Santissimo Redentore (Church of the Most Holy Redeemer), is Andrea Palladio's great domed church on Giudecca, one of the islands of Venice. Located on the waterfront of the Canale della Giudecca, it dominates the skyline of the island.The Redentore was built in thanksgiving for deliverance from the plague that decimated Venice from 1575 to 1576, in which some 46,000 people, 25-30 percent of the population, died. The Senate commissioned the great architect Palladio to design it. Construction began in May 1577. The building was in a satisfactory stage and was consecrated in 1592.

St. Saviour's, Venice

"More than one cause served to render the compositions of Palladio so celebrated. He possessed an especial…

"A certain originality and freedom of intervention is perceptible in the buildings of the early period of the Venetian Renaissance style; the old style is happily blended with the new, which during the first stage is still imbued with Romanesque conceptions."The Vendramin were a rich merchant family of Venice, Italy. What is now the most prominent "Palazzo Vendramin" in Venice, the splendid Ca' Vendramin Calergi by Mauro Codussi on the Grand Canal, was in fact only inherited by the family in 1739, and is now the casino, also famous as the place where Richard Wagner died in 1883. Some rooms are kept as a museum commemorating Wagner's stay. The 16th century Ca' Vendramin di Santa Fosca in the Cannaregio quarter, now also a hotel, is where Gabriele Vendramin's collection was housed. Yet another is the 16th or possibly 17th century "Palazzo Vendramin dei Carmini", in Dorsoduro, most of which is now occupied by part of the University of Venice.

Vendramin Palace at Venice

"A certain originality and freedom of intervention is perceptible in the buildings of the early period…

"More than one cause served to render the compositions of Palladio so celebrated. He possessed an especial felicity in the arrangement of his ground-plans, particularly in instances where he had an unlimited space for disposal. His command, moreover, of good proportion , rendered his combinations of civic and sacred buildings most pleasing to the eye; whilst the columnar arrangement of his entrances conveyed an agreeable, and at the same time, dignified impression. Consequently the works of Palladio, although often composed of heterogeneous elements, remained for a long period the model for an entire style; and even in the eighteenth century, when the total deterioration of architecture, as exemplified in what is called by the Germans "the Zopf-und-Perrücken Styl" (pigtail and periwig style), led architects again in the direction of the classical, the designs of Palladio became anew a subject of study. Even in present day they are often immoderately praised by those who are not really conversant with the principles and requirements of art, and who are ignorant of the history of the development of architecture."Villa Capra "La Rotonda" is a Renaissance villa just outside Vicenza, northern Italy, designed by Andrea Palladio. The correct name is Villa Almerico-Capra. It is also known as La Rotonda, Villa Rotunda, Villa La Rotonda, and Villa Almerico. The name "Capra" derives from the Capra brothers, who completed the building after it was ceded to them in 1591. Like other works by Palladio in Vicenza and the surrounding area, the building is conserved as part of the World Heritage Site "City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto".

Villa by Palladio

"More than one cause served to render the compositions of Palladio so celebrated. He possessed an especial…

Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England. Wollaton Park is the area of parkland that the stately house stands in. The house itself is a natural history museum, with other museums in the out-buildings. The surrounding land is regularly used for large scale outdoor events such as rock concerts and festivals."It is especially this vitiated taste in form and details which characterized the Elizabethan Renaissance [shown here]. The usual Roccoco Renaissance forms also occur in it, as, for instance, the quadrant-shaped gables curving alternately inwards and outwards, as also pilasters and columns intersected by quoins and bands; and various grotesque and debased forms. Enriched quoins are also freely used at angles and jambs."

Wollaton Hall

Wollaton Hall is a country house standing on a small but prominent hill in Wollaton, Nottingham, England.…