This ClipArt gallery includes 71 illustrations related to the State of Maryland.

Color illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, and Rhode Island. This flag was in use from June 14, 1777 until May 1, 1795.

13 Star United States Flag, 1776

Color illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states of Delaware,…

Black line illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Georgia, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maryland, South Carolina, New Hampshire, Virginia, New York, North Carolina, and Rhode Island. This flag was in use from June 14, 1777 until May 1, 1795.

13 Star United States Flag, 1776

Black line illustration of a 13 Star United States flag. The original 13 stars represent the states…

"The State House in Annapolis. This fine building is situated upon an elevation in the center of the city, and is admired by every visitor, not only for its style of architecture, but for the beauty of its location. The building is of brick. The superstructure consists of a spacious dome, surmounted by two smaller ones, with a cupola of wood. From the dome, a magnificent prospect opens to the eye. Around the spectator is spread out the city and harbor like a map, while far away to the southeast stretches the Chesapeake, with Kent Island and the eastern shore looming up in the distance. The edifice fronts Francis Street, and the hill on which it stands is surrounded by a substantial granite wall, surmounted by an iron railing, having three gateways. It was erected in 1772, upon the site of the old Court-house, built in 1706. The corner stone was laid by Governor Robert Eden. The dome was not built until after the Revolution. The architect was Joseph Clarke. Tradition relates that when Governor Eden struck the corner stone with a mallet, at the time of laying it, a severe clap of thunder burst over the city, though there was not a cloud in the sky. Thomas Dance, who executed the stucco work of the dome, fell from the scaffold, and was killed, just as he finished the center piece."—Lossing, 1851

Annapolis State House

"The State House in Annapolis. This fine building is situated upon an elevation in the center of the…

"The invasion of Maryland- General Meade's Army crossing the Antietam in pursuit of Lee, July 12th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Antietam

"The invasion of Maryland- General Meade's Army crossing the Antietam in pursuit of Lee, July 12th,…

The Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties. The Sunken Road was worn down by years of wagon traffic, which formed a natural trench for the men.

Sunken Road at Battle of Antietam

The Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg,…

Scene at the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties. The Sunken Road was worn down by years of wagon traffic, which formed a natural trench for the men.

Sunken Road at Battle of Antietam

Scene at the Sunken Road at the Battle of Antietam. The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle…

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming the Confederate position, after a desperate conflict of four hours, Wednesday, September 17th, 1862. On the left, during the afternoon, Burnside carried the bridge, after an obstinate contest of four hours' duration and a loss of about five hundred killed and wounded. Hawkins's Zouaves then crossed, and finding the enemy ready drawn up under cover of the hills, advanced in line of battle on their new position, about half a mile distant. The ground over which they advanced was open clover and plowed fields, the latter very difficult and fatiguing to march in, owing to the softness of the ground. The enemy's guns, fourteen in number, kept up a terrible fire on the advancing line, which never wavered, but slowly toiled along, receving shelter, however, when they were in the hollows. They were halted a few moments to rest in the hollow nearest the enemy's position, and then were ordered to charge with a yell. As they came up the hillin front of the enemy's batteries they received a heavy volley from a large force of infantry behind a stone wall about two hundred feet in front of the enemy's batteries. The Federals, though terribly decimated, gave them a volley in return, and then went on with the bayonet. The enemy did not stay to contest the ground, and although two to one, broke and ran, leaving their guns." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Antietam

"Battle of Antietam, Md. Burnside's division carrying the bridge over the Antietam Creek and storming…

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South), fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, and Antietam Creek, as part of the Maryland Campaign, was the first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil. It was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam (also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, particularly in the South), fought on…

Scene by rail-fence, Antietam after the Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg. The Battle of Antietam was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

Scene by rail-fence, Antietam after the Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg.…

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near Sharpsburg, Maryland and was the first major battle in the Civil War to take place in the North. This battle was the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with about 23,000 casualties.

Battle of Antietam

The Battle of Antietam, also known as the Battle of Sharpsburg, was fought on September 17, 1862, near…

The grateful citizens of Baltimore presented Colonel Armistead with an elegant silver vase, in the form and of the size of the largest bomb-shell thrown into the fort by the British, during the War of 1812.

The Armistead Vase

The grateful citizens of Baltimore presented Colonel Armistead with an elegant silver vase, in the form…

"General Banks's headquarters near Edward's Ferry, Md." —Leslie, 1896

Headquarters of Banks

"General Banks's headquarters near Edward's Ferry, Md." —Leslie, 1896

A monument for The Battle of North Point, fought on September 12, 1814.

Battle of North Point Monument

A monument for The Battle of North Point, fought on September 12, 1814.

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana Zouaves in their bivouac at Cumberland, Maryland. Great interest was attached to this regiment after its brilliant attack at Romney; and as we have presented them in the midst of the action, we have pleasure in showing them to our readers roughing it in their distant camps. The members of this regiment were magnificent specimens of the physical man, and under the Colonel Wallace and his officers, who marched on foot, leading their men, accomplished feats of endurance and daring that had been considered impossible in warfare.

Bivouac of the Eleventh Indiana Volunteers

Our special artist, who accompanied General McClellan's command, sketched the gallant Eleventh Indiana…

"Battle of Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the first Federal victory in Maryland. On Sunday, the 14th day of September, having previously evacuated Frederick City, the rear of the Confederate army had reached the Blue Ridge Pass on the line of the national road leading from Frederick toward Hagerstown and the fords of the upper Potomac. Here it was overtaken by the Federal advance under Generals Hooker and Reno. The position was a strong one and strongly guarded, but was carried, after a severe action, by the Federal forces, the Confederates falling back in disorder. In this engagement General Reno was killed on the Federal side, and General Garland on that of the Confederates. The Federal loss was four hundred and forty-three killed, one thousand eight hundred and six wounded, and seventy-six missing; that of the Confederates, five hundred killed, two thousand three hundred and forty-three wounded, and one thousand five hundred prisoners."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Blue Ridge Pass

"Battle of Blue Ridge Pass, Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the first Federal victory in Maryland. On…

Burnside's Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. During the Battle of Antietam of the Civil War, the bridge played a key role in September of 1862 when a small number of Confederate soldiers from Georgia for several hours held off repeated attempts by elements of the Union Army to take the bridge by force. The Federals seized it but not before the attack was delayed for several hours beyond what Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside had expected. The bridge now bears Burnside's name.

Burnside's Bridge

Burnside's Bridge is a landmark on the Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, Maryland. During…

Cecilius Calvert, also known as Lord Baltimore, was an English colonizer who was the first proprietor of the Maryland colony.

Cecil Calvert, Lord Baltimore

Cecilius Calvert, also known as Lord Baltimore, was an English colonizer who was the first proprietor…

Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore (August 8, 1605 – November 30, 1675), usually called Cecil, was an English coloniser who was the first proprietor of the Maryland colony. He received the proprietorship that was intended for his father, George Calvert, the 1st Lord Baltimore, who died shortly before it was granted.

Cecilius Calvert

Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore (August 8, 1605 – November 30, 1675), usually called Cecil,…

(died 1632) Founder of Maryland colony in 1632

George Calvert (Lord Baltimore)

(died 1632) Founder of Maryland colony in 1632

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Maryland

Charles Carroll

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Maryland

The Catholics of Maryland.

Catholics

The Catholics of Maryland.

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Maryland

Samuel Chase

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Maryland

Maryland XII Pence (XII Pence) Maryland Colony coin from 1659. Obverse has an image of Lord Baltimore surrounded by the inscription - +CAECILIVS:DNS:TERRAE-MARIAE:&CT;. The reverse shows the Baltimore family shield, the denomination in roman numerals to either side of the shield. The inscription surrounding the image - CRESCITE:ET:MVLTIPLICAMINI. This coin was also struck in copper.

Silver Maryland XII Pence Coin, 1659

Maryland XII Pence (XII Pence) Maryland Colony coin from 1659. Obverse has an image of Lord Baltimore…

"The Confederate invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. The Confederate cavalry crossing the Potomac, June 11th, 1863. When the Confederate cavalry force under General Jenkins crossed the Potomac, a movement happily portrayed by our artist, and hurried across Maryland, within the borders of the Keystone State all with confusion and alarm. As they advanced it was impossible to tell what point would be assailed. Pittsburg, with its machine shops and foundries; Harrisburg, the capital, with the State archives; Philadelphia with its great wealth, might any or all be reached. in this emergency the Governor exerted his full powers, the citizens to some extent rallying to his call."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Confederate Invasion

"The Confederate invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. The Confederate cavalry crossing the Potomac,…

This sketch depicts the Confederates crossing the Potomac during the Maryland Campaign or the Antietam Campaign (September 4-20, 1862). The Maryland Campaign is considered one of the major turning points of the Civil War.

Confederates Crossing the Potomac

This sketch depicts the Confederates crossing the Potomac during the Maryland Campaign or the Antietam…

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel Baker's Regiment, October 21st, 1861. Conrad's Ferry is situated on the Maryland side of the Upper Potomac, about five miles above Edward's Ferry. It was in possession of the Federal troops. It commands a view of Harrison's Island, the scene of so much disaster at the battle of Ball's Bluff, and is immediately opposite to Leesburg Heights, the town of Leesburg being about five miles from the Ferry, on the south side of the Potomac." —Leslie, 1896

Conrad's Ferry

"Conrad's Ferry, Md., above Harrison's Island, on the Potomac River, the place of passage of Colonel…

"Gallant charge of the Sixth Michigan cavalry over the enemy's breastworks, near falling Waters, Md., July 14th, 1863. The exploits of the Federal cavalry in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania in 1863 would fill a volume in themselves. Among the many gallant charges there are few more brilliant than that of the Sixth Michigan at Falling Waters, where they rode, without drawing rein, right over the Confederate breastworks, scattering all before them. The cavalry were not more than sixty at most, but they charged up a steep hill in the face of a terrific fire; and though they lost in killed and wounded nearly two-thirds of their number, they captured almost the entire force of the enemy, with three regimental battle flags."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Falling Waters

"Gallant charge of the Sixth Michigan cavalry over the enemy's breastworks, near falling Waters, Md.,…

"Maryland and Pennsylvania farmers visiting the battlefield of Antietam, while the Federal troops were burying the dead, Friday, September 19th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Farmers Visiting

"Maryland and Pennsylvania farmers visiting the battlefield of Antietam, while the Federal troops were…

Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812 when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in the Chesapeake Bay.

Ruins of Battery at Fort McHenry

Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812…

Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812 when it successfully defended Baltimore Harbor from an attack by the British navy in the Chesapeake Bay.

Sallyport at Fort McHenry

Fort McHenry, in Baltimore, Maryland, is a star shaped fort best known for its role in the War of 1812…

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate army- their enthusiastic reception by the inhabitants, September 12th, 1862. Most certainly it was distance that lent enchantment to the view of the eyes of the Marylanders, so far as the Confederate army was concerned, for it appeared that, instead of 50,000 recruits so confidently predicted by Mr. Miles, one of the Confederate Congress of Richmond, they did not actually realize more then 700, and of these nearly 300 refused to carry out their enlistments. All accounts proved that the Confederate army was of the Felstaffian regime, and not at all calculated to make a favorable impression upon the olfactory and pecuniary faculties of the Secessionists of Maryland. When the Confederate generals, with their staffs, entered Frederick City, they were at first welcomed, but when the ragged regiments made their appearance a change came over the spirit of their dream, and the inhabitants woke from their delusion. Our sketch reprsents the rapturous reception given to Gneral McClellan. It was a perfect ovation. Flowers were showered down upon the Federals, while the waving of flags and the cheers of the inhabitants completed the inspiring scene." —Leslie, 1896

Frederick City

"General McClellan and the Federal troops passing through Frederick City, Md., in pursuit of the Confederate…

"A reconnoitring detachment of General Banks's cavalry, Hyattstown, Md., in the distance. There are few sights more picturesque than a detachment of cavalry winding along the road to some quiet little village. Nature and man seem then so little in harmony that the contradiction becomes strikingly attractive. Our illustration represents a scene of this kind- a detachment of Federal cavalry, sent by order of General Banks, reconnoitring in the neighborhood of Hyattstown, a post village of Montgomery County, Md., and situated on Bennett's Creek, about thirty-six miles to the northwest of Washington." —Leslie, 1896

Cavalry of General Banks

"A reconnoitring detachment of General Banks's cavalry, Hyattstown, Md., in the distance. There are…

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie, 1896

March of General Banks

"Incident in the march of General Banks's Division during a storm in Western Maryland." — Frank Leslie,…

Senator from Maryland and president of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company.

Arthur Pue Gorman

Senator from Maryland and president of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company.

On May 3, 1813, during the War of 1812, Havre de Grace was under siege by British Admiral George Cockburn.

Havre de Grace

On May 3, 1813, during the War of 1812, Havre de Grace was under siege by British Admiral George Cockburn.

Thomas Holliday Hicks (September 2, 1798 - February 14, 1865) was an American politician from Maryland. He served as Governor of Maryland from 1858 until 1862, and as a U.S. Senator from Maryland from 1862 until his death in 1865.

Thomas Holliday Hicks

Thomas Holliday Hicks (September 2, 1798 - February 14, 1865) was an American politician from Maryland.…

John Eager Howard (June 4, 1752 - October 12, 1827) was an American soldier and Senator from Maryland as well as Maryland's fifth governor. He was born in and died in Baltimore County.

John Eager Howard

John Eager Howard (June 4, 1752 - October 12, 1827) was an American soldier and Senator from Maryland…

The Johns Hopkins University is a private university based in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. It was established in 1876.

Johns Hopkins University

The Johns Hopkins University is a private university based in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. It…

Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796 – February 10, 1876) was a statesman and jurist from Maryland.

Reverdy Johnson

Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796 – February 10, 1876) was a statesman and jurist from Maryland.

First Governor of Maryland

Thomas Johnston

First Governor of Maryland

"Lee's army crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, in scows guided by wires, after the invasion of Maryland."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Lee's Army

"Lee's army crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, in scows guided by wires, after the invasion of Maryland."—…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Maryland in 1889.

Maryland

The official seal of the U.S. state of Maryland in 1889.

The United States seal of Maryland with the Blue Ridge Mountains in the background.

Maryland

The United States seal of Maryland with the Blue Ridge Mountains in the background.

The state banner of Maryland, the old line state.

Maryland

The state banner of Maryland, the old line state.

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1875

Maryland seal

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1875

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1876

Maryland seal

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1876

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1876

Maryland seal

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1876

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1890

Maryland seal

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1890

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1904

Maryland seal

Seal of the state of Maryland, 1904

Maryland shilling from Colonial period

Maryland Shilling

Maryland shilling from Colonial period

The Great Seal of the State of Maryland. The seal is a shield being held by plowman and a fisherman. The motto 'Fatti maschii, parole femine' means "Strong deeds, gentle words."

Seal of Maryland

The Great Seal of the State of Maryland. The seal is a shield being held by plowman and a fisherman.…

"How the Daughters of Maryland received the Sons of the North as they marched against the Confederate invaders- scene on the march."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Daughters of Maryland

"How the Daughters of Maryland received the Sons of the North as they marched against the Confederate…

"The invasion of Maryland- citizens of Baltimore barricading the streets, Monday evening, June 29th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Invasion of Maryland

"The invasion of Maryland- citizens of Baltimore barricading the streets, Monday evening, June 29th,…

"The invasion of Maryland- General Kilpatrick repulsing the Confederate Stuart at Boonsborough, July 8th, 1863. The Civil War showed many affairs quite confusing old ideas. We had colonels commanding fleets and marines serving ashore, mounted infantry and dismounted cavalry. On the 8th of July, 1863, General Kilpatrick, who was endeavoring to cut off the Confederate trains from Gettysburg, was attacked by Stuart, and both these fine cavalry officers fought with their men dismounted, Kilpatrick repulsing his antagonist and subsequently capturing a large number of prisoners and wagons."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Invasion of Maryland

"The invasion of Maryland- General Kilpatrick repulsing the Confederate Stuart at Boonsborough, July…

The seal of colonial Maryland, a British colony in 1632.

Seal of Maryland

The seal of colonial Maryland, a British colony in 1632.

Commodore Charles Morris, USN (1784 – 1856) was a U.S. naval administrator and officer whose service extended through the first half of the 19th century.

Charles Morris's Monument

Commodore Charles Morris, USN (1784 – 1856) was a U.S. naval administrator and officer whose service…

"'Fresh Bread!'- Impromptu oven built by the Nineteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers, in General Banks's division, Western Maryland. The impromptu oven which we illustrate testified to the Federal cleverness, and ministered to the wants of the brave defenders of the Union. The regiment undoubtedly contained men whose means gave them every epicurean indulgence; but we question if any French bread, fresh butter, with all the appliances of Delmonico, ever tasted so sweet as the newly baked bread they got from the primitive oven." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Oven

"'Fresh Bread!'- Impromptu oven built by the Nineteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers, in General Banks's…

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Maryland

William Paca

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Maryland

One Ninth of a Dollar (1/9 dollar) Maryland currency from 1775. No image on bill.

Paper Money, One Ninth of a Dollar Bill, 1775

One Ninth of a Dollar (1/9 dollar) Maryland currency from 1775. No image on bill.

Two Thirds of a Dollar (2/3 dollar) Maryland currency from 1774. Image on the right shows a shield with a farmer on the left and a fisherman on the right.

Paper Money, Two Thirds of a Dollar Bill, 1774

Two Thirds of a Dollar (2/3 dollar) Maryland currency from 1774. Image on the right shows a shield with…