This ClipArt gallery offers 243 examples of gothic architecture, from full churches and buildings to structural details. Gothic architecture is defined as the archiecture noted from the 12th to 16th century, originating in France. It superceded Romanesque architecture, and preceded the Renaissance.

The Westminster Abbey is a Gothic church located in Westminster, London. The church has a pointed style of architecture which signifies the Gothic style.

Westminster Abbey

The Westminster Abbey is a Gothic church located in Westminster, London. The church has a pointed style…

All Saints Cathedral at Albany.

All Saints Cathedral

All Saints Cathedral at Albany.

All Saints' Church, Brixworth, is an outstanding example of early Anglo-Saxon architecture located in central England, and has been called "perhaps the most imposing architectural memorial of the seventh century yet surviving north of the Alps"

All Saints' Church, Brixworth

All Saints' Church, Brixworth, is an outstanding example of early Anglo-Saxon architecture located in…

"Plan of Amiens Cathedral. A, Apsidal aisle. B B, Outer aisles of choir. F G, Transepts. H, Central tower. I J, Western turrets. M, Principal or western doorway. N N, Western side doors. P Q, North and south aisles of choir. R R R, Chapels. T U, North and south aisles of nave." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Amiens Cathedral

"Plan of Amiens Cathedral. A, Apsidal aisle. B B, Outer aisles of choir. F G, Transepts. H, Central…

The cross section of the Amiens Cathedral. (E) triforium, (F) clerestory.

Amiens Cathedral

The cross section of the Amiens Cathedral. (E) triforium, (F) clerestory.

"An arcade of small dimensions, such as a balustrade, formed by a series of little arches. Image: Arcature.- Cathedral of Petersborough, England."-Whitney, 1902

Arcature

"An arcade of small dimensions, such as a balustrade, formed by a series of little arches. Image: Arcature.-…

"An arcade of small dimensions, such as a balustrade, formed by a series of little arches. Image: Arcature.- Cathedral of Petersborough, England."-Whitney, 1902

Arcature

"An arcade of small dimensions, such as a balustrade, formed by a series of little arches. Image: Arcature.-…

Cinquefoil, part of a Gothic ornament commonly found in stone decorations of windows or panels.

Architecture

Cinquefoil, part of a Gothic ornament commonly found in stone decorations of windows or panels.

Gothic architecture has pointed arches, clustered pillars, vaulted roofs, and profusion of ornaments.

Gothic Architecture

Gothic architecture has pointed arches, clustered pillars, vaulted roofs, and profusion of ornaments.

Rayonnnant Gothic balustrade.

Balustrade

Rayonnnant Gothic balustrade.

Flamboyant French Gothic balustrade at Chateau of Josselyn.

Balustrade

Flamboyant French Gothic balustrade at Chateau of Josselyn.

Early Gothic or transitional balustrade.

Balustrade

Early Gothic or transitional balustrade.

Early Gothic balustrade.

Balustrade

Early Gothic balustrade.

Flamboyant balustrade from the Chateau of Josselyn.

Balustrade

Flamboyant balustrade from the Chateau of Josselyn.

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the 6th century around c.525 on land given by the king of Gwynedd, Maelgwn Gwynedd. Deiniol is said to have been consecrated as a bishop by Saint David, making him the first Bishop of Bangor. This monastery was sacked in 634 and again in 1073. Nothing of the original building survives.

Bangor Cathedral, Caernarvonshire

The site of Bangor Cathedral was originally occupied by St. Deiniol's monastery, established in the…

"The Banqueting Hall at Haddon is a good type of the baronial halls in this century. The minstrels' gallery, at the end opposite the daïs, is usually a feature; under the passage called the Screens, leading from the outer to the inner courtyard and giving access to the kitchen, pantry, and gallery." —Bargield, 1914

Gothic Architecture Banquet Hall

"The Banqueting Hall at Haddon is a good type of the baronial halls in this century. The minstrels'…

Early type gothic column base from Halberstadt.

Base

Early type gothic column base from Halberstadt.

Late type gothic column base from Rouen, France.

Base

Late type gothic column base from Rouen, France.

One bay from Salisbury Cathedral, England.

Bay

One bay from Salisbury Cathedral, England.

One bay from the choir of Lincoln Cathedral, England.

Bay

One bay from the choir of Lincoln Cathedral, England.

One bay from the nave of Lichfield Cathedral, England.

Bay

One bay from the nave of Lichfield Cathedral, England.

A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault or the unit of an opening and its framing on a façade.

Bay of Abbey of St. Denis

A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault…

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English cathedral with three spires. Architecturally, the choir (alt. spelling quire) is the area of a church or cathedral, usually in the western part of the chancel between the nave and the sanctuary (which houses the altar). A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault or the unit of an opening and its framing on a façade.

One Bay of Choir, Lichfield Cathedral

Lichfield Cathedral is situated in Lichfield, Staffordshire, England. It is the only medieval English…

The Catholic Cathedral of Limburg, also known as <em>Georgsdom</em> or <em>Limburger Dom</em> in German (English: Cathedral of St. George) after its dedication to Saint George, is one of the most accomplished buildings of the late Romanesque style. A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault or the unit of an opening and its framing on a fa&ccedil;ade.

One Bay of Limburg Cathedral

The Catholic Cathedral of Limburg, also known as Georgsdom or Limburger Dom in German…

A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault or the unit of an opening and its framing on a fa&ccedil;ade.

Bay of Speyer Cathedral

A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault…

The Cathedral of St Martin (Italian Duomo) is a church in Lucca, Italy. It was begun in 1063 by Bishop Anselm (later Pope Alexander II). Of this structure, the great apse with its tall columnar arcades and the fine campanile remain. A bay is a module in classical or Gothic architecture, the distance between two supports of a vault or the unit of an opening and its framing on a fa&ccedil;ade.

One Bay, Nave of Lucca Cathedral

The Cathedral of St Martin (Italian Duomo) is a church in Lucca, Italy. It was begun in 1063 by Bishop…

A bell gable is a kind of turret placed on the apex of a gable at the west end of small churches and chapels.

Bell Gable

A bell gable is a kind of turret placed on the apex of a gable at the west end of small churches and…

The Cathedral of Bourges is located in Bourges, France. It Cathedral was built in dedication to Saint Stephen. The structure of the Cathedral is designed in a Gothic style with the use of flying buttresses.

Cathedral of Bourges

The Cathedral of Bourges is located in Bourges, France. It Cathedral was built in dedication to Saint…

Buttress and Flying Buttress.

Buttress

Buttress and Flying Buttress.

Buttress pinnacle from Notre Dame, Paris.

Buttress Pinnacle

Buttress pinnacle from Notre Dame, Paris.

Buttress pinnacle from Notre Dame, Paris.

Buttress Pinnacle

Buttress pinnacle from Notre Dame, Paris.

A corner buttress from Chancel of Claybrooke Church, Leicestershire. The buttress would have a statues inside the buttress for decoration.

Chancel of Claybrooke Church Corner Buttress

A corner buttress from Chancel of Claybrooke Church, Leicestershire. The buttress would have a statues…

Flying Buttress, St. Ouen.

Buttress, Flying

Flying Buttress, St. Ouen.

A flying buttress, or arc-boutant, is a specific type of buttress usually found on a religious building such as a cathedral. They are used to transmit the horizontal thrust of a vault across an intervening space (which might be an aisle, chapel or cloister), to a buttress outside the building. The employment of the flying buttress means that the load bearing walls can contain cut-outs, such as for large windows, that would otherwise seriously weaken them. Flying buttresses are often found in Gothic architecture.

Early Gothic Flying Buttress

A flying buttress, or arc-boutant, is a specific type of buttress usually found on a religious building…

"The civic buildings of Venice are many of them fine specimens of the same style; of these, one of the richest is the palace called the Ca d'Oro." &mdash;D'Anvers, 1895

Ca d'Oro

"The civic buildings of Venice are many of them fine specimens of the same style; of these, one of the…

A canopy is the projecting moulding that surrounds the arches and heads of Gothic niches.

Canopy

A canopy is the projecting moulding that surrounds the arches and heads of Gothic niches.

A canopy is the projecting moulding that surrounds the arches and heads of Gothic niches.

Canopy Detail

A canopy is the projecting moulding that surrounds the arches and heads of Gothic niches.

"Canterbury Cathedral, which was a key place during the contest with King John. In the quarrel with John of England the issue was not a matter of personal morality, but of Church authority. There was a dispute about the election to the Archbishopric of Canterbury, the most important church office in England. The monks of Canterbury chose one candidate and the king another, and then both parties appealed to the pope. Innocent rejected both candidates and proposed one of his own, Stephen Langton, a man in every way suitable for the office. John refused to submit, and the pope used against him the same means that had been employed to coerce Philip Augustus. He laid England under an interdict, and, though its effect was not so immediate as in France, it finally brought John to terms. Not only was John obliged to accept the pope's candidate, but he went so far as to surrender the kingdom of England to the pope and receive it back as the pope's vassal, paying in token of vassalage a sum of money each year."&mdash;Colby, 1899

Canterbury Cathedral

"Canterbury Cathedral, which was a key place during the contest with King John. In the quarrel with…

Early French Gothic capital from Sainte Chapelle.

Capital

Early French Gothic capital from Sainte Chapelle.

Fourteenth century French Gothic capital from the transept of Notre Dame, Paris.

Capital

Fourteenth century French Gothic capital from the transept of Notre Dame, Paris.

French Gothic capital from St. Martin des Champs, Paris.

Capital

French Gothic capital from St. Martin des Champs, Paris.

French Gothic capital from St. Martin des Champs, Paris.

Capital

French Gothic capital from St. Martin des Champs, Paris.

French Gothic capital with corner leaf from Notre Dame, Paris.

Capital

French Gothic capital with corner leaf from Notre Dame, Paris.

French Rayonnant capital.

Capital

French Rayonnant capital.

Capital from Salisbury Cathedral, England.

Capital

Capital from Salisbury Cathedral, England.

Capital from Lincoln Cathedral

Capital

Capital from Lincoln Cathedral

Decorated capital from Beverley Cathedral

Capital

Decorated capital from Beverley Cathedral

Early English capital from Lincoln Cathedral.

Capital

Early English capital from Lincoln Cathedral.

Decorated English capital from Beverley Cathedral.

Capital

Decorated English capital from Beverley Cathedral.

Decorated English capital from Beverley Cathedral.

Capital

Decorated English capital from Beverley Cathedral.

A French Gothic capital from Sainte Chapelle in Paris from the thirteenth century. The capitals were tall and slender, concave in profile, with heavy square or octagonal abaci. After the middle of the thirteenth century the carving became more realistic; the leaves, larger and more mature, were treated as if applied to the capital or moulding, not as if they grew out of it.

French Gothic Capital

A French Gothic capital from Sainte Chapelle in Paris from the thirteenth century. The capitals were…

A fourteenth century capital from transept of Notre Dame, Paris. The capitals were tall and slender, concave in profile, with heavy square or octagonal abaci. After the middle of the thirteenth century the carving became more realistic; the leaves, larger and more mature, were treated as if applied to the capital or moulding, not as if they grew out of it.

French Gothic Capital

A fourteenth century capital from transept of Notre Dame, Paris. The capitals were tall and slender,…

A fifteenth century capital from the north spire of Chartres. The capitals were tall and slender, concave in profile, with heavy square or octagonal abaci. After the middle of the thirteenth century the carving became more realistic; the leaves, larger and more mature, were treated as if applied to the capital or moulding, not as if they grew out of it.

French Gothic Capital

A fifteenth century capital from the north spire of Chartres. The capitals were tall and slender, concave…

This Graeco-Ionic capital is a scroll design with intervals of egg band and palmettes.

Graeco-Ionic Capital

This Graeco-Ionic capital is a scroll design with intervals of egg band and palmettes.

The late Gothic capital has an abacus that is octagonal with projected leaves. This capital has an appearance of an inverted bell.

Late Gothic Capital

The late Gothic capital has an abacus that is octagonal with projected leaves. This capital has an appearance…

The late Gothic capital has an abacus that is octagonal with projected leaves. This capital has an appearance of an inverted bell.

Late Gothic Capital

The late Gothic capital has an abacus that is octagonal with projected leaves. This capital has an appearance…

Capitals from the chapter house of Southwell Cathedral.

Capitals

Capitals from the chapter house of Southwell Cathedral.

An illustration of a Gothic capitals from Wells Cathedral. In several traditions of architecture including Classical architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, 'head') forms the crowning member of a column or a pilaster. The capital projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the form of the latter (normally square) with the circular shaft of the column.

Gothic Capitals

An illustration of a Gothic capitals from Wells Cathedral. In several traditions of architecture including…

An illustration of a Gothic capitals from from Amiens Cathedral. In several traditions of architecture including Classical architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, 'head') forms the crowning member of a column or a pilaster. The capital projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the form of the latter (normally square) with the circular shaft of the column.

Gothic Capitals

An illustration of a Gothic capitals from from Amiens Cathedral. In several traditions of architecture…

"A Castle is a building constructed for the purpose of repelling attack. The castella left by the Romans were constructed on the general model of their stationary encampments, and though they may have suggested the castles of the Middle Ages, they differed from them in being designed for military purposes only, and not as places of permanent residence."&mdash;(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Castle

"A Castle is a building constructed for the purpose of repelling attack. The castella left by the Romans…