This ClipArt gallery includes 78 illustrations related to the State of Georgia.

An illustration of a Savannah, Georgia sergeant of police.

Savannah Sergeant of Police

An illustration of a Savannah, Georgia sergeant of police.

"Review of Confederate troops on their march to Virginia, in front of the Pulaski Monument, Monument Square, Savannah, Ga., August 7th, 1861. The Pulaski Monument is situated in Johnson or Monument Square. It is a fine Doric obelisk of marble, 53 feet in height. The base of the pedestal is 10 feet 4 inches by 6 feet 8 inches, and its elevation is about 12 feet. The corner stone was laid by Lafayette during his visit to the United States in 1825. The needle which surmounts the pedestal is 37 feet high. Another and very elegant structure has also been erected to the memory of this gallant foreigner in Chippewa Square. Pulaski was killed in the attack made by the allied American and French armies in 1779, when the British held possession of Savannah." —Leslie, 1896

Pulaski Monument

"Review of Confederate troops on their march to Virginia, in front of the Pulaski Monument, Monument…

An illustration of the Pulanski monument located in Savannah, Georgia. Pulaski was laid out in 1837 and is named for General Casimir Pulaski, a Polish-born Revolutionary War hero who died of wounds received in the Siege of Savannah (1776). It is one of the few squares without a monument -- General Pulaski's statues is actually in nearby Monterey Square.

Pulaski Monument

An illustration of the Pulanski monument located in Savannah, Georgia. Pulaski was laid out in 1837…

Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island at the entrance to the Savannah River, Georgia, was built by the United States Government in 1829-31, for the defense of Tybee Roads and the Savannah River approach to the city of Savannah, Georgia. In January, 1861, it was seized and occupied by the military authorities of the State of Georgia, and held by them until transferred to the Confederate Government, by whom it was strongly armed and garrisoned. In form it was pentagonal; its walls were forty feet high, and presented two faces on the sea approach. The full armament of the fort consisted on the lower tier of 65 32-pounders, and the upper tier of 53 24-pounders, 4 18-pounders flanking howitzers, 1 13-inch mortar, 12 8-inch columbiads, and 7 10-inch mortars. The interior of the fort was well supplied with massive furnaces for heating shot, officers' quarters, soldiers' barracks, magazines, and a tolerable supply of shot and powder.

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island at the entrance to the Savannah River, Georgia, was built by the United…

"Sherman's Campaign in Georgia- the Battle of Resaca."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Resaca

"Sherman's Campaign in Georgia- the Battle of Resaca."— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Savannah River is a major river in the southeastern United States, forming most of the border between the states of South Carolina and Georgia. Two tributaries of the Savannah, the Tugaloo Rivers and the Chattooga River, form the northernmost part of the border. The Savannah River drainage basin extends into the southeastern side of the Appalachian Mountains just inside North Carolina, bounded by the Eastern Continental Divide. The ricer is about 350 miles long.

Savannah River

The Savannah River is a major river in the southeastern United States, forming most of the border between…

"The war in Georgia- the Sixteenth Army Corps fording the Chattahoochee at Roswell's Ferry, July 10th, 1864."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Roswell's Ferry

"The war in Georgia- the Sixteenth Army Corps fording the Chattahoochee at Roswell's Ferry, July 10th,…

Savannah, from a print of 1741.

Savannah

Savannah, from a print of 1741.

"View of Savannah, Ga., looking east, toward Fort Jackson. Savannah, the entry port of Georgia, is built on a sandy plain, forty feet above low-water mark. It is the centre of a very extensive system of railroads, which contribute greatly to its commercial importance. As a harbor for blockade runners it was not of much importance after Fort Pulaski fell into the Federal hands. Savannah was founded by General Oglethorpe in 1732. The river is navigable for steamers up to Augusta, 230 miles from its mouth, Savannah itself being 18 miles from the sea. Our view was taken from the cupola of the Exchange, looking east, with Fort Jackson on the left."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Savannah

"View of Savannah, Ga., looking east, toward Fort Jackson. Savannah, the entry port of Georgia, is built…

An illustration of Savannah, Georgia.

Savannah, Georgia

An illustration of Savannah, Georgia.

"Sherman's Campaign in Georgia- the attack of the Fourteenth, Sixteenth and Twentieth Army Corps on Kenesaw Mountain, June 22nd, 1864. Kenesaw Mountain, a second Lookout among its fellows, is about four miles in length and some four hundred feet high, difficult of ascent, with spurs on the flanks, and presenting a most dignified appearance. Sherman resolved to flank it, and on June 22nd the corps of the right and left of his army advanced, the centre maintaining its position around and upon the base of the mountain in the teeth of a very heavy artillery fire from the Confederate batteries. The Twentieth and Twenty-third wheeled on the left to hem in the Confederates between the Federal line and the railroad. The Fourteenth Kentucky met the enemy first, who charged furiously to check the movement. Schofield and Hooker were, however, ready. Williams's division drove back the enemy with artillery alone, without the employment of a musket. Batteries I and M of the First New York had second position, which gave them a cross fire upon the Confederates as they advanced over an open field, and it proved entirely too hot for them. Again, about six o'clock, they made the same attempt, and were driven back still more rapidly by a combined fire of artillery and musketry, which must, from the openness of the ground, have proved very destructive. The Federal losses were slight. They did not exceed two hundred killed and wounded during the day, and one-quarter of this loss was suffered by the Fourteenth Kentucky."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Sherman's Campaign

"Sherman's Campaign in Georgia- the attack of the Fourteenth, Sixteenth and Twentieth Army Corps on…

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

An illustration of Atlanta, Georgia's state house as depicted in 1874.

State House

An illustration of Atlanta, Georgia's state house as depicted in 1874.

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was an American politician from Georgia. He was Vice President of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.

Alexander Hamilton Stephens

Alexander Hamilton Stephens (February 11, 1812 – March 4, 1883) was an American politician from Georgia.…

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

The prison at Millen

A view of the prison-pen at Millen, Georgia.

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Georgia

George Walton

Signer of the Declaration of Independence representing Georgia

(1749-1804) First Governor of Georgia

George Walton

(1749-1804) First Governor of Georgia

Toccoa Falls waterfall is located on the campus of Toccoa Falls College in Stephens County, Georgia. Toccoa is the Cherokee Indian name for "beautiful."

Toccoa Falls

Toccoa Falls waterfall is located on the campus of Toccoa Falls College in Stephens County, Georgia.…