This ClipArt gallery offers 43 images related to Scotland, including famous landmarks, scenic views, buildings, and coins.

The obverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

Écu, Obverse

The obverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

The reverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

Écu, Reverse

The reverse side of an écu of James V of Scotland, a Scotch gold coin also called a crown.

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic style Christian monastery located in Melrose, Scotland. The Abbey was founded in 1136 by Cistercian Monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland.

Melrose Abbey

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic style Christian monastery located in Melrose, Scotland. The Abbey was founded…

"As the ruins of Fountains Abbey are a memorial of the iconoclasm of the Reformation movement in England, so are the remains of Melrose Abbey a like monument of the iconoclastic phase of the Reformation in Scotland With the change in doctrines there, the monks of the historic abbey - it was founded in the thirteenth century - were driven out and the beautiful sculptures of the abbey church defaced."—Myers, 1905

Melrose Abbey

"As the ruins of Fountains Abbey are a memorial of the iconoclasm of the Reformation movement in England,…

A symmetrical anticlinal fold, the top of which has been eroded. Near St. Abb's Head, Scotland.

Anticlinal Fold

A symmetrical anticlinal fold, the top of which has been eroded. Near St. Abb's Head, Scotland.

A musical instrument used in Scotland.

Bagpipe

A musical instrument used in Scotland.

Basaltic Columns at Finagl's Cave in Scotland. It is formed entirely from hexagonally-jointed basalt.

Basaltic Columns

Basaltic Columns at Finagl's Cave in Scotland. It is formed entirely from hexagonally-jointed basalt.

The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge over the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland, to the east of the Forth Road Bridge, and 14 km (9 miles) west of central Edinburgh. It is often called the Forth Rail Bridge or Forth Railway Bridge to distinguish it from the Forth Road Bridge, but should correctly be referred to as the Forth Bridge. The bridge connects Scotland's capital Edinburgh with the Kingdom of Fife, and acts as a major artery connecting the north-east and south-east of the country. Described as "the one internationally recognised Scottish landmark", it may be nominated by the British government as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The bridge and its associated railway infrastructure is owned by Network Rail Infrastructure Limited.

Forth Bridge

The Forth Bridge is a cantilever railway bridge over the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland, to…

(1759-1796) Scottish poet

Robert Burns

(1759-1796) Scottish poet

"Castle Rock, Edinburgh." — Chambers, 1881

Castle Rock

"Castle Rock, Edinburgh." — Chambers, 1881

An illustration of the entrance to the chapel at St. Salvators College.

Chapel

An illustration of the entrance to the chapel at St. Salvators College.

"Chief of the Clan MacDonell." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Chief

"Chief of the Clan MacDonell." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

During the Middle Ages, Perth's only parish church was the Burgh Kirk of St. John the Baptist. With the town centre dominated by this huge building. The building was split into three congregations (the East, West and Middle Kirks), divided by internal walls, after the Reformation, and was only returned to its medieval proportions in the 1920s by Sir Robert Lorimer, who restored the building as a war-memorial for those soldiers from Perthshire who had fallen in the Great War.

The Old Church, Perth, N.B.

During the Middle Ages, Perth's only parish church was the Burgh Kirk of St. John the Baptist. With…

"Crail Church (before the restoration)." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Crail Church

"Crail Church (before the restoration)." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

A memorial cross found in Forteviot, Scotland.

Cross

A memorial cross found in Forteviot, Scotland.

"A royal and parliamentary burgh and seaport, situated on the east coast of Scotland, in the county of Forfar, on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, twelve miles from the confluence of that estuary with the German Ocean. It is the third town in Scotland as regards to population, and the second in commercial importance." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Dundee

"A royal and parliamentary burgh and seaport, situated on the east coast of Scotland, in the county…

Heraldry representing the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

Edinburgh

Heraldry representing the city of Edinburgh, Scotland.

An illustration of Glasgow University from Kelvingrove Park.

Glasgow University

An illustration of Glasgow University from Kelvingrove Park.

An illustration of the Scot Choppin, also known as the half-pint.

Half-Pint

An illustration of the Scot Choppin, also known as the half-pint.

A Scottish hotel located in Edinburgh.

Cockburn Hotel

A Scottish hotel located in Edinburgh.

Iona is a small island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Iona has an important place in the history of Christianity in Scotland and is renowned for its tranquility and natural beauty.

Iona

Iona is a small island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Iona has an important place in the history…

The most complete remains of a medieval nunnery.

The Ruins of Iona

The most complete remains of a medieval nunnery.

King of Scotland

James I

King of Scotland

Kelso Abbey is a Scottish abbey built in the 12th century by a community of Tironensian monks who had moved from the nearby Selkirk Abbey. The monks constructed the Abbey on land granted to them by King David I. The construction commenced in 1128, and when completed fifteen years later, in 1143, it was dedicated to The Blessed Virgin and Saint John. The importance of the Abbey at that time was shown when King James III of Scotland was crowned at the Abbey in 1460. However, the Abbey's proximity to the border with England led to it suffering damage from cross-border raids. It was first damaged in the Anglo-Scottish wars at the start of the 1300s, but was later repaired by the monks.

Ruins of Kelso Abbey

Kelso Abbey is a Scottish abbey built in the 12th century by a community of Tironensian monks who had…

(1797-1875) Scotch geologist

Sir Charles Lyell

(1797-1875) Scotch geologist

Queen of Scotland. Executed by Queen Elizabeth of England.

Mary Queen of Scots

Queen of Scotland. Executed by Queen Elizabeth of England.

(1542-1587) Queen of Scotland

Mary Queen of Scots

(1542-1587) Queen of Scotland

Although the Stewart family had gained the Scottish throne Marjory, Mary, Queen of Scots became Queen only because all male alternatives had been exhausted.

Mary Queen of Scots

Although the Stewart family had gained the Scottish throne Marjory, Mary, Queen of Scots became Queen…

Mary I (popularly known in the English-speaking world as Mary, Queen of Scots and, in France, as Marie Stuart) (8 December 1542 – 8 February 1587) was Queen of Scots (the monarch of the Kingdom of Scotland) from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567. She was also the queen consort of France from 10 July 1559 to 5 December 1560. After a long period of custody in England, she was tried and executed for treason following her alleged involvement in three plots to assassinate Elizabeth I of England and place herself on the English throne.

Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary I (popularly known in the English-speaking world as Mary, Queen of Scots and, in France, as Marie…

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic-style abbey in Melrose, Scotland. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks, on the request of King David I of Scotland. In 1544, as English armies raged across Scotland and badly damaged the Abbey which was never fully repaired.

Melrose Abbey Ruins

Melrose Abbey is a Gothic-style abbey in Melrose, Scotland. It was founded in 1136 by Cistercian monks,…

"The buildings which have been constructed in these various styles differ essentially from those which have been carried out in the same styles in other countries. In churches and other buildings erected in the Gothic style this difference mainly consists in deficiency of strongly marked architectural keeping, for both main and subordinate features are generally irregular. In most cases the whole group is highly unsymmetrical, and the tower is at one corner, by which a picturesque effect is aimed at [shown here]. The material and the mode of construction are generally left visible, and it is endeavoured to utilize them as ornament; and this not only externally but also in the interior, where the beams and rafters of the roof are often left quite bare; they are even thus exposed where their appearance is not in keeping with the destination of the buildings."

Memorial Church in Scotland

"The buildings which have been constructed in these various styles differ essentially from those which…

"Piper of the Clan Gregarach." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Piper

"Piper of the Clan Gregarach." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Royal Arms of Scotland, previous to the Union." — Chambers, 1881

Royal Arms of Scotland

"Royal Arms of Scotland, previous to the Union." — Chambers, 1881

Scotch Highlander with bagpipe

Scotch Highlander with Bagpipe

Scotch Highlander with bagpipe

The king of Scots bore Gold a lion within a double tressure flowered and counterflowered gules

Scotland

The king of Scots bore Gold a lion within a double tressure flowered and counterflowered gules

Scotland, St. Andrew's Banner. St. Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.

Scotland, St. Andrew's Banner

Scotland, St. Andrew's Banner. St. Andrew is the patron saint of Scotland.

Scene from "How a Thistle Saved Scotland."

Scots

Scene from "How a Thistle Saved Scotland."

(1771-1832) Scottish novelist

Sir Walter Scott

(1771-1832) Scottish novelist

Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, at Winsfield Castle

Marty Stuart

Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, at Winsfield Castle

Queen of Scots, born in the palace of Linlithgow, Scotland, Dec. 8, 1542; executed Feb. 8, 1587. She was the daughter of James V. of Scotland and Mary of Lorraine, a daughter of the duke of Guise of France.

Mary Stuart

Queen of Scots, born in the palace of Linlithgow, Scotland, Dec. 8, 1542; executed Feb. 8, 1587. She…

(1542-1587) Mary, Queen of Scots (Mary I of Scotland).

Mary, Queen of Scots

(1542-1587) Mary, Queen of Scots (Mary I of Scotland).

Synclinal fold near Banff, Scotland.

Synclinal Fold

Synclinal fold near Banff, Scotland.

"Plan of chambered barrow or cairn, at Garrywhin, Caithness. BARROW, a sepulchral mound of earth or stones raised over the site of a burial as a mark of honor to the dead." -Hazeltine, 1894

Tumulus

"Plan of chambered barrow or cairn, at Garrywhin, Caithness. BARROW, a sepulchral mound of earth or…