This ClipArt gallery includes 59 illustrations related to the State of Louisiana.

Color illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee. This flag was in use from July 04, 1818 until July 3, 1819.

20 Star United States Flag, 1818

Color illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of Indiana,…

Black line illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of Indiana, Louisiana, Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee. This flag was in use from July 04, 1818 until July 3, 1819.

20 Star United States Flag, 1818

Black line illustration of a 20 Star United States flag. The additional stars represent the states of…

The attack on New Orleans, during the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812.

Attack on New Orleans

The attack on New Orleans, during the Battle of New Orleans during the War of 1812.

The Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil War fought in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana.

Battle of Baton Rouge

The Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil…

"Banks's Expedition- burning of the state capitol of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, Tuesday night, December 30th, 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Burning of Baton Rouge

"Banks's Expedition- burning of the state capitol of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, Tuesday night, December…

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle in the Civil War fought in East Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on August 5, 1862. The Union victory halted Confederate attempts to recapture the capital city of Louisiana.

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge

Gunboats at the Battle of Baton Rouge, also known as Magnolia Cemetery, was a ground and naval battle…

An illustration of Baton Rouge, Louisiana from the Mississippi River. Baton Rouge is located in the southeast portion of the state along the Mississippi River. It owes it located and its historical importance to its site upon Istrouma Bluff, the first bluff upriver from the Mississippi delta, which protects the city's residents from flooding or other natural disasters.

Baton Rouge, LA

An illustration of Baton Rouge, Louisiana from the Mississippi River. Baton Rouge is located in the…

Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. He was a member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Louisiana, and member of the cabinet posts in the Confederate States of America.

Judah Philip Benjamin

Judah Philip Benjamin (August 6, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was an American politician and lawyer. He was…

(1680-1767) Famous colonizer and governor of French Louisiana.

Sieur de Bienville

(1680-1767) Famous colonizer and governor of French Louisiana.

(1680-1767) Governor of French Louisiana.

Sieur de Bienville

(1680-1767) Governor of French Louisiana.

The Battle of New Orleans took place on January 8, 1815, and was the final major battle of the War of 1812. It took place about five miles south of New Orleans on the grounds of Chalmette Plantation.

Chalmette's Plantation

The Battle of New Orleans took place on January 8, 1815, and was the final major battle of the War of…

"Extempore musical and terpischorean entertainment at the United States arsenal, Baton Rouge, La., under the patronage of the Forty-First Massachusetts, the one hundred and Thirty-First New York and the Twenty-Fifth Connecticut Volunteers- contraband children dancing the breakdown. If anything were necessary to show the sensuous nature of music, it would be found in the eagerness with which the contraband race pursued it. The Federals, with that love of fun which ever distinguishes the brave soldier off duty, got up, a few evenings after their arrival at Baton Rouge, an extempore musical and terpsichorean entertainment, in which the darky element was largely and loudly represented. The hall was one of the extensive rooms in the United States Arsenal building, and prominent among the promoters were the Forty-first Massachusetts, One Hundred and Thirty-first New York and the Twenty-fifth Cennecticut Volunteers. One of the features was a breakdown, which was dance, or rather jumped, with great vigor by a couple of contraband juveniles."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Civil War entertainment

"Extempore musical and terpischorean entertainment at the United States arsenal, Baton Rouge, La., under…

First Governor of Louisiana

William C. C. Claiborne

First Governor of Louisiana

William Charles Cole Claiborne (1775 - 23 November 1817) was a United States politician, best known as the first U.S. governor of Louisiana.

William Charles Cole Claiborne

William Charles Cole Claiborne (1775 - 23 November 1817) was a United States politician, best known…

A cotton press yard of the Cotton Centennial in the 1884 World's Fair in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Cotton Centennial

A cotton press yard of the Cotton Centennial in the 1884 World's Fair in New Orleans, Louisiana.

When civil law was restored, Jackson was fined for contempt of court for proclaiming martial law in New Orleans.

The Old Courthouse Where Jackson was Fined for Contempt of Court

When civil law was restored, Jackson was fined for contempt of court for proclaiming martial law in…

"Cutting the levees near the state line of Louisiana and Arkansas, twenty miles above Lake Providence, by order of General Grant. War calls upon men imperatively to do many things which seem most inhuman, and only justified on the ground of being a choice of evils. Our sketch represents one of those painful acts, the cutting of the levees, near the State line of Louisiana and Arkansas. The scene our artist has sketched is about twenty miles above Lake Providence, which is now connected with the Mississippi by a canal dug by the Federal troops, under General McPherson's command, whose headquarters was on the shore of this beautiful lake. Mr. Lovie said, in his letter to us: 'The soil is very tough, and will not wash away. The levees consequently have to be blown up with gunpowder. The soil is then loosened with spades. On the spot which I sketch, about half a mile has been removed and the water covers the ground to the depth of ten feet, and steamboats now run in to Bayou Macon.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Cutting Levees

"Cutting the levees near the state line of Louisiana and Arkansas, twenty miles above Lake Providence,…

"Capture of Fort De Russy, La., on the 14th of March, 1864, by the Federal forces under General Andrew Jackson Smith. This fort was captured, March 14th, 1864, by the Federal forces under General A. J. Smith. The expedition left Vicksburg on March 10th, landed at Summerville, La., on the 13th, and marched to Bayou Glace, where General Scurri's Confederate brigade had been encamped, which fled on the approach of the transports, leaving considerable camp equipage and commissary stores. General Smith pushed forward to Yellow Bayou, where strong fortifications had been erected; but the Confederates again fled. As he came up the enemy was pressed, and some skirmishing occurred, resulting in the capture of several prisoners and a small wagon train. At daylight the entire command started for Fort de Russy, twenty-eight miles distant, hotly pursued by General Dick Taylor, who hoped to save the fort; but Smith had the lead, and at four o'clock in the afternoon the Third and Ninth Indiana Batteries opened on the fort, which replied vigorously with three of its heaviest guns. The cannonade continued an hour, when General Smith ordered the First and Second illinois Regiments, Sixteenth Corps, under General Mower, to charge the enemy's rifle pits and storm the fort. The Eighty-ninth and One Hundred and Nineteenth Indiana and Twenty-fourth Missouri Regiments charged over deep ditches and a thick abatis in the face of a galling fire, and within twenty minutes after the order was given the [African American] sergeant of the Fifty-eighth Illinois Volunteers planted the American flag upon the enemy's works."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort de Russy

"Capture of Fort De Russy, La., on the 14th of March, 1864, by the Federal forces under General Andrew…

James Biddle Eustis (August 27, 1834 - September 9, 1887) was a United States Senator from Louisiana.

James Biddle Eustis

James Biddle Eustis (August 27, 1834 - September 9, 1887) was a United States Senator from Louisiana.

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans, LA., April 19th, 1862. The bombardment of the forts lasted six days, commencing on Friday, April 18th, and practically closing on the 24th, when Flag Officer Farragut passed up with his fleet, Captain Bailey, in the <em>Cayuga</em>, leading. First Division- Captain Bailey commanding: <em>Cayuga, Pensacola, Mississippi, Oneida, Varuna, Katahdin, Kineo, Wissahickon, Portsmouth</em>, towed by <em>J. P. Jackson</em>. Second Division- Flag Officer Farragut commanding: <em>Hartford, Brooklyn, Richmond</em>. Third Division- Captain Bell, commanding: <em>Scioto, Iroquois, Pinola, Itasca, Winona, Kennebec</em>. On Friday, April 25th, at twenty-two minutes past one, this magnificent fleet brought up before the renowned city of New Orleans in battle array. A flag of truce was immediately dispatched by Flag Officer Farragut, demanding an immediate and unconditional surrender." —Leslie, 1896

Federal fleet

"Panoramic view of the Federal fleet passing the forts of the Mississippi, on its way to New Orleans,…

"Battle of Grand Coteau, La., November 3rd, furious attack on the Sixtieth Indiana, Colonel Owen. On the 3rd of November, 1863, the enemy, about six thousand strong, under General Green, attacked in force; but the Seventeenth Ohio Battery kept them at bay, supported by the Eighty-third Ohio, the Sixtieth Indiana watching the flank. A lull soon occurred, and the Sixtieth was sent to hold a bridge and small bayou on the skirt of the woods. This they did, and at last, by Burbridge's order, advanced till friend and foe were so mingled in strife that cannon could not be used; but finally the Sixtieth Indiana, with the Ninety-sixth Ohio and the Twenty-third Wisconsin, who come to its aid, fell back, the Twenty-third losing their brave colonel, Guppy. In this retrograde movement the enemy's mounted Texan infantry surrounded the Sixty-seventh Indiana. General Burbridge in vain endeavored to save them with a section of the Seventeenth Ohio Battery, but the Confederates closed around them so that he had to suspend his fire for fear of killing his own men, and Lieutenant Colonel Bushler, with two hundred men, surrendered to the enemy."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Grand Coteau

"Battle of Grand Coteau, La., November 3rd, furious attack on the Sixtieth Indiana, Colonel Owen. On…

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Grand Coteau- capture of the Sixty-seventh Indiana by the Texas Mounted Infantry, November 3rd, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Grand Coteau

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Grand Coteau- capture of the Sixty-seventh Indiana by the Texas Mounted…

"Assault of the Second Louisiana [African American] Regiment on the Confederate works at Fort Hudson, May 27th, 1863. The Battle of Fort Hudson was a severe and well-fought action. The Federal troops displayed their usual bravery, and were well handled by General Banks, driving the enemy to his second line of works. Of the [African American] regiments General Banks, in his official report, says: 'They answered every expectation. Their conduct was heroic. No troops could be more determined or more daring. They made during the day three charges upon the batteries of the enemy, suffering very heavy losses, and holding their position at nightfall with the other troops on the right of our line. The highest commendation is bestowed upon them by all officers in command on the right. Whatever doubt may have existed heretofore as to the efficiency of organizations of this character, the history of this day proves conclusively to those who were in a condition to observe the conduct of these regiments that the Government will find in this class of troops effective supporters and defenders. The severe test to which they were subjected, and the determined manner with which they encountered the enemy leave upon my mind no doubt of their ultimate success. They require only good officers, commands of limited numbers, and careful discipline to make them excellent soldiers.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Fort Hudson

"Assault of the Second Louisiana [African American] Regiment on the Confederate works at Fort Hudson,…

The headquarters of Andrew Jackson in New Orleans during the War of 1812.

Jackson's Headquarters

The headquarters of Andrew Jackson in New Orleans during the War of 1812.

During the War of 1812, when British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses, including militia from several western states and territories.

Jackson's Headquarters, New Orleans

During the War of 1812, when British forces threatened New Orleans, Jackson took command of the defenses,…

Andrew Jackson's reception by the citizens of New Orleans following his defeat of the British in the Battle of New Orleans.

Jackson's Reception by the Citizens of New Orleans

Andrew Jackson's reception by the citizens of New Orleans following his defeat of the British in the…

"The war in Louisiana- General Franklin's army crossing the prairie in Lafayette Parish, November 16th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Lafayette Parish

"The war in Louisiana- General Franklin's army crossing the prairie in Lafayette Parish, November 16th,…

"Lake Providence, La., headquarters of General McPherson and the Federal division under his command. Our artist wrote: 'The Seventeenth Army Corps, under General McPherson, have been exceedingly fortunate in being ordered to Lake Providence, La. Their tents are pitched in pleasant places. I have not seen a position anywhere along the Mississippi River, or anywhere else, which offers such inducements for any army 'to stay awhile' as the banks of this beautiful lake. There is a little town on the landing, which is only fit for, and therefore only occupied by, negro quarters and sutler shops. The lake is immediately back of the village, and not more than a quarter of a mile from the river. Immense cotton fields stretch away on both sides of it, and beautiful residences, surrounded by elaborate gardens full of Southern shrubbery, adorn its banks.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Lake Providence

"Lake Providence, La., headquarters of General McPherson and the Federal division under his command.…

Edward Livingston (26 May 1764–23 May 1836) was a prominent American jurist and statesman. He was an influential figure in the drafting of the Louisiana Civil Code of 1825, a civil code based largely on the Napoleonic Code. He represented both New York, and later Louisiana in Congress and he served as the U.S. Secretary of State from 1831 to 1833.

Edward Livingston

Edward Livingston (26 May 1764–23 May 1836) was a prominent American jurist and statesman. He was…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Louisiana in 1889.

Louisiana

The official seal of the U.S. state of Louisiana in 1889.

The state banner of Louisiana, the pelican state.

Louisiana

The state banner of Louisiana, the pelican state.

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1876

Louisiana seal

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1876

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1876

Louisiana seal

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1876

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1890

Louisiana seal

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1890

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1904

Louisiana seal

Seal of the state of Louisiana, 1904

The seal of the state of Louisiana. The seal shows a pelican in her piety, feeding her young with her own blood. This image is surrounded with the state motto, "Union, justice, and confidence."

Seal of Louisiana

The seal of the state of Louisiana. The seal shows a pelican in her piety, feeding her young with her…

Martial Law in Louisiana in 1875. The U.S. Bayonet is not partisan in the Louisiana Legislature.

Louisiana's Martial Law in 1875

Martial Law in Louisiana in 1875. The U.S. Bayonet is not partisan in the Louisiana Legislature.

"The war in Louisiana. The army of General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou, October 10th, 1863. Our artist presents a view of the Federal army under General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou on October 10th, 1863. He reached it on the 9th, and finding the bridge destroyed, shelled the shores, and meeting no response, ordered his engineers to lay the pontoon bridges, on which the forces crossed, as shown in our engraving."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana. The army of General Banks crossing Vermilion Bayou, October 10th, 1863. Our artist…

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Mansfield, between General Banks and General Dick Taylor, April 8th, 1864."— Frank Leslie, 1896

War in Louisiana

"The war in Louisiana- Battle of Mansfield, between General Banks and General Dick Taylor, April 8th,…

The Mississippi at Port Hudson, Louisiana.

Mississippi at Port Hudson

The Mississippi at Port Hudson, Louisiana.

"The war in Louisiana- New Iberia."— Frank Leslie, 1896

New Iberia

"The war in Louisiana- New Iberia."— Frank Leslie, 1896

New Orleans in 1719

New Orleans

New Orleans in 1719

View of New Orleans in 1719

New Orleans

View of New Orleans in 1719

A scene of swampy New Orleans, Louisiana in 1719.

New Orleans in 1719

A scene of swampy New Orleans, Louisiana in 1719.

New Orleans levee.

New Orleans levee

New Orleans levee.

Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans

Battle of New Orleans

Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans

The levee at New Orleans, Louisiana in the 1800's.

The Levee at New Orleans

The levee at New Orleans, Louisiana in the 1800's.

A drawing of a street in old New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Bit of Old New Orleans

A drawing of a street in old New Orleans, Louisiana.

"The Plantation Police, or Patrol, was an institution peculiar to the Slave States. It was a semi-military organization, raised and supported by the planters, but recognized by the old State authorities. Their principal duty was to visit the various plantations and patrol the roads at night, arresting all [African Americans] and others not having proper passes. The war, the President's proclomation, and the actual possession of most of the State of Louisiana by the Federal authorities, rendered these patrols doubly rigorous. Some of the [African Americans] submitted reluctantly. The [African American] in the foreground is a speciman of this class. He seems to yield to the superior force of a tottering power, satisfied that his day is at hand; others show the obsequious, submissive stamp- the [African American] satisfied with his lot if he is clothed and fed."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Plantation Police

"The Plantation Police, or Patrol, was an institution peculiar to the Slave States. It was a semi-military…

Port Eads, Louisiana, is located at the southern tip of the Mississippi River, also known as South Pass in Plaquemines Parish. It is the southern most point in Louisiana.

Port Eads

Port Eads, Louisiana, is located at the southern tip of the Mississippi River, also known as South Pass…

The Red River Campaign or Red River Expedition consisted of a series of battles fought along the Red River in Louisiana during the American Civil War. Pictured here is the fleet passing the dam.

Red River Expedition

The Red River Campaign or Red River Expedition consisted of a series of battles fought along the Red…

The Battle of Rodriguez's Canal was a prelude to the Battle of New Orleans that occurred near New Orleans on January 1st 1815.

Remains of Rodriguez's Canal in 1861

The Battle of Rodriguez's Canal was a prelude to the Battle of New Orleans that occurred near New Orleans…

"Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi- United States war steamer "Mississippi" firing on a Confederate steamer." —Leslie, 1896

Ship Island

"Ship Island, near the mouth of the Mississippi- United States war steamer "Mississippi" firing on a…

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

A Slave Auction in New Orleans

A slave auction in New Orleans, Louisiana.

John Slidell (1793 – July 26, 1871) was an American politician, lawyer and businessman.

John Slidell

John Slidell (1793 – July 26, 1871) was an American politician, lawyer and businessman.

"Voluntary dispersion of Kirby Smith's Confederate army at Shreveport, La., May 23rd, 1865. There was a great difference between the surrenders of General Lee and Kirby Smith. The former surrendered his army to General Grant; while the army under Kirby Smith dispersed itself, leaving the Confederate leader no army. Our sketch represents the manner in which those roughest of the Confederates broke up their military organization, and scattered to their homes and haunts. The following is Kirby Smith's orders, dated Houston, May 30th. 'Soldiers: The day after I refused the demand of the Federal Government to surrender this department I left Shreveport for Houston; I ordered the Missouri, Arkansas and Louisiana troops to follow. My purpose was to concentrate the entire strength of the department, await negotiations, and, if possible, secure terms alike honorable to soldier and citizen. I reached here to find the Texas troops disbanded and hastening to their homes. They had forsaken their colors and commanders; had abandoned the cause for which we were struggling, and appropriated the public property to their personal use. Soldiers, I am left a commander without an army; a general without troops. You have made your choice. The enemy will now possess your country, and dictate his own laws. You have voluntarily destroyed your organization and thrown away all means of resistance.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kirby Smith

"Voluntary dispersion of Kirby Smith's Confederate army at Shreveport, La., May 23rd, 1865. There was…

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Louisiana Confederacy Stamp (5 cent) from 1861

Louisiana Confederacy Five Cent Stamp, 1861

Louisiana Confederacy Stamp (5 cent) from 1861

Jacques Phillippe Viller&eacute; (April 28, 1761 - 7 March 1830) was the second Governor of Louisiana after it became a state. Pictured is his home in New Orleans.

Villere's mansion

Jacques Phillippe Villeré (April 28, 1761 - 7 March 1830) was the second Governor of Louisiana…