This ClipArt gallery offers 318 images of the Roman Empire including culture, people, everyday life, coats of arms, and more.

"All histories of England commence with the invasion of Julius Caesar, the earliest event in that quarter of which we have any authentic account. The Island of Britain was an unknown region to the Romans, and nearly so to the rest of mankind, at the period when Caesar's conquests had reduced the greater part of Gaul to the Roman government. Britain, lying within sight of the northern shores of Gaul, attracted his notice, and he began to meditate schemes of conquest." — Goodrich, 1844

Caesar in England

"All histories of England commence with the invasion of Julius Caesar, the earliest event in that quarter…

"The Death of Caesar. Naturaly such extraordinary success made him enemies, and though the city seemed in the main to be contented with his rule, it was easy for his ill-wishers to play on the passions of the people by pointing out that he had aimed at the complete overthrow of the constitution and the establishment of a tyranny. It was said that he intended to assume the title of king. Several times a crown was publicly offered to him and he refused it; but his refusal was thought to proceed merely from his perception of the displeasure of the people. A plot was formed against him, and the Ides (15th day) of March, 44 B.C., was fixed upon for his assassination. The rumors of the intended murder got abroad and Caesar was warned of the plot, but he took no notice of these warnings. On the appointed day he was surrounded in the Senate by the conspirators and killed. Among the assassins was one of whom Caesar had always regarded as his especial friend. This was Brutus, and it is said that Caesar, when he recognized him among his assailants, ceased to offer resistance, and exclaiming, 'Thou too, Brutus!' allowed himself to be slain."—Colby, 1899

Caesar's Death

"The Death of Caesar. Naturaly such extraordinary success made him enemies, and though the city seemed…

Julius Caesar riding on a horse.

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar riding on a horse.

Julius Caesar heard that a little way off there was a country nobody knew anything about, except that the people were very fierce and savage, and that a sort of pearl was found in the shells of mussels which lived in the rivers. He could not bear that there should be any place that his own people, the Romans, did not know and subdue. So he commanded the ships to be prepared, and he and his soldiers embarked, watching the white cliffs in the other side of the sea grow higher and higher as he came nearer and nearer.

Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar heard that a little way off there was a country nobody knew anything about, except that…

An image depicting Julius Caesar, a Roman general and statesman. He was a key component to the shift of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire. He emerged as the unrivaled leader of the Roman world in 49 BC.

Julius Caesar

An image depicting Julius Caesar, a Roman general and statesman. He was a key component to the shift…

"Caliga." — Greenough, 1899

Caliga

"Caliga." — Greenough, 1899

Cameo, a term applied to gems of different colors sculptured in relief. The art of engraving on gems boasts of high antiquity, having been practised with various degrees of success by the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans.

Cameo

Cameo, a term applied to gems of different colors sculptured in relief. The art of engraving on gems…

"Sacrifice in Camp. Military Band." — Greenough, 1899

Camp Sacrifice

"Sacrifice in Camp. Military Band." — Greenough, 1899

"Originally a candlestick, but afterwards the name of a stand for supporting lamps, in which signification most commonly occurs. The candelara of this kind were usually made to stand upon the ground, and were of a considerable height. The most common kind were made of wood; but those which have been found in Herculaneum and Pompeii are mostly of bronze. sometimes they were made of the more precious metals, and even of jewels. The candelbra did not always stand upon the ground, but were also placed upon the table. Such candelabra usually consisted of pillars, from the capitals of which several lamps hung down, or of trees, from whose branches lamps also were suspended. the preceding cut represents a very elegant candelabrum of this kind, found in Pompeii." — Smith, 1873;

Candelabrum

"Originally a candlestick, but afterwards the name of a stand for supporting lamps, in which signification…

Candelabrum

Candelabrum

Candelabrum

Candelabrum on a triangular pedistal in Vatican Museum.

Candelabrum

Candelabrum on a triangular pedistal in Vatican Museum.

"A robe worn by the Medes and Persians over their trowsers and other garments. It had wide sleeves, and was made of woollen cloth, which was either purple or of some other splendid colour. In the Persepolitan sculptres, from which the annexed figures are taken, nearly all the principal personages wear it." — Smith, 1873;

Candys

"A robe worn by the Medes and Persians over their trowsers and other garments. It had wide sleeves,…

The Capitoline Hill is a Roman hill between the Forum and the Campus Martius. The Cloaca Maxima was one of the world's earliest sewage systems. "The Capitoline and Cloaca Maxima. A restoration." -Allen, 1890

Capitoline and Cloaca Maxima

The Capitoline Hill is a Roman hill between the Forum and the Campus Martius. The Cloaca Maxima was…

"A box for holding books among the Romans. These boxes were of cylindrical form. There does not appear to have been any difference between the capsa and scrinium, except that the latter word was usually applied to those boxes which held a considerable number of rolls. The slaves who had the charge of these book-chests were called capsarii, and also custodes scriniorum; and te slaves who carried in a capsa behind their young masters the books of the sons of respectable Romans, when they went to school, were called by the same name." — Smith, 1873;

Capsa

"A box for holding books among the Romans. These boxes were of cylindrical form. There does not appear…

Caracalla is remembered as one of the most notorious emperors of Rome.

Caracalla

Caracalla is remembered as one of the most notorious emperors of Rome.

Caractacus was a British Chief that had fought very bravely against the Romans. He was brought to Rome with chains on his hands and feet and set before the emperor of Rome. The wife of Caratacus, who had also been brought a prisoner to Rome, fell upon her knees imploring pity, but Caractacus asked for nothing and exhibited no signs of fear.

Caractacus And Claudius

Caractacus was a British Chief that had fought very bravely against the Romans. He was brought to Rome…

The system of encampment among the romans was one of singular regularity and order.

Castra

The system of encampment among the romans was one of singular regularity and order.

"Catapult from the Roman military system. The Roman army was divided into legions, each of which contained about 6,000 men, although at first the number was much smaller. Each legion was in turn subdivided into ten cohorts. Besides the legionary soldiers, the army comprised bodies of auxiliar troops from the provinces or the allies of Rome. The common weapons were the pilum, or javelin, and a short sword, but slings and bows were also used."—Colby, 1899

Catapult

"Catapult from the Roman military system. The Roman army was divided into legions, each of which contained…

A catapult as used during the Roman Empire. The catapult is an effective device used to hurl an object a great distance without the assistance of explosive devices.

A Catapult

A catapult as used during the Roman Empire. The catapult is an effective device used to hurl an object…

Roman catapulta war machine.

Catapulta

Roman catapulta war machine.

"A seat or chair, was more particularly applied to a soft seat used by women, whereas sella signified a seat common to both sexes. The cathedrae were, no doubt, of various forms and sizes; but they usually appear to have had backs to them. On the cathedra in the annexed cut, is seated a bride, who is being fanned by a female slave with a fan made of peacock's feathers. Women were also accustomed to be carried abroad in these cathedrae instead of in lecticae, which practice was sometimes adopted by effeminate persons of the other sex. The word cathedra was also applied to the chair or pulpit from which lectures were read." — Smith, 1873

Cathedra

"A seat or chair, was more particularly applied to a soft seat used by women, whereas sella signified…

"Cavalryman Charging." — Greenough, 1899

Cavalryman

"Cavalryman Charging." — Greenough, 1899

"Cavalryman with Vexillum." — Greenough, 1899

Cavalryman

"Cavalryman with Vexillum." — Greenough, 1899

Charging cavalryman pictured trampling an enemy soldier and holding a spear in the Gallic War.

Cavalryman Charging

Charging cavalryman pictured trampling an enemy soldier and holding a spear in the Gallic War.

Cavalryman pictured on rearing horse with Vexillum.

Cavalryman with Vexillum

Cavalryman pictured on rearing horse with Vexillum.

"In makin Aeneas burn incense, Virgil follows the custom of his own time rather than historical verity." — Anthon, 1891

Ancient censer

"In makin Aeneas burn incense, Virgil follows the custom of his own time rather than historical verity."…

"The commander of a centuria or company of infantry, varying in number with the legion. The century was a military division, corresponding to the civil one curia; the centurio of the one answered to the curio of the other. From analogy we are led to conclude that the century originally consisted of thirty men. In later times the legion was composed of thirty maniples, or sixty centuries. As its strength varied from about three to six thousand, the numbers of a century would vary in proportion from about fifty to a hundred." — Smith, 1873

Centurio

"The commander of a centuria or company of infantry, varying in number with the legion. The century…

A Centurio was a low-to-middle ranking officer in charge of a "century", ideally 100 men but ranging higher and lower than that number.

Roman Centurio

A Centurio was a low-to-middle ranking officer in charge of a "century", ideally 100 men but ranging…

"The cestus used in later times, in the public games, was a most formidable weapon. It was frequently covered with knobs and nails, and loaded with lead and iron.  Figures with the cestus frequently occur on ancient remains. They appear to have been of various forms as appears in the fololowing specimens taken from ancient monuments." — Anthon, 1891

Cestus

"The cestus used in later times, in the public games, was a most formidable weapon. It was frequently…

"The cestus was used by boxers from the earliest times. It consisted of thongs of raw ox-hide, or of leather, tied round the hands of pugilists, in order to render their blows more powerful. Sometimes these bands were tied round the arms as high as the elbow." — Anthon, 1891

Boxer with cestus

"The cestus was used by boxers from the earliest times. It consisted of thongs of raw ox-hide, or of…

A section of chain mail from a suit of chain mail armor, lorica hamata.

Chain Mail

A section of chain mail from a suit of chain mail armor, lorica hamata.

A Roman chariot.

Chariot

A Roman chariot.

The King of the Franks from 768 and the Emperor of the Romans from 800 until his death in 814.

Charlemagne

The King of the Franks from 768 and the Emperor of the Romans from 800 until his death in 814.

"Charlemagne's signature. Only the central portion was made by Charles, the other letters, forming the name Karolus, being written by a secretary."—Colby, 1899

Charlemagne's Signature

"Charlemagne's signature. Only the central portion was made by Charles, the other letters, forming the…

"More particularly was the new sect of Christians selected as the objects of vengeance. These people had already gained the intense dislike of Rome. The austerity of their manners, the severe tenets of their faith so opposed to the license of paganism, their customs and laws so antagonistic to the usages of the state, all combined to render them odious to the commonwealth."—Ridpath, 1885

Christians Given to the Lions in the Roman Amphitheater

"More particularly was the new sect of Christians selected as the objects of vengeance. These people…

Cinerary chest and urn in the Vatican Museum.

Cinerary Chest and Urn

Cinerary chest and urn in the Vatican Museum.

"Chariot-racing was a favorite amusement, and the great circuses were arranged especially for such contests. The space was broad enough to accommodate three of four chariots side by side, each with four horses abreast."—Ridpath, 1885

Circus Maximus

"Chariot-racing was a favorite amusement, and the great circuses were arranged especially for such contests.…

An illustration of a Roman cithara.

Roman Cithara

An illustration of a Roman cithara.

A Roman clipeus.

Roman clipeus

A Roman clipeus.

"A pair of panniers, and therefore only used in the plural number. In Italy they were commonly used with mules or asses; but in other countries they were also applied to horses, of which an instance is given in the annexed woodcut from the column of Trajan." — Smith, 1873

Clitellae

"A pair of panniers, and therefore only used in the plural number. In Italy they were commonly used…

"The following cut represents a Roman clypeus, from the column of Trajan. The projection in the centre was called the <em>umbo</em>, or boss, and sometimes a spike or other prominent excrescence, was placed upon this." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Roman clypeus

"The following cut represents a Roman clypeus, from the column of Trajan. The projection in the centre…

Ruins of the Coliseum in Rome.

Coliseum

Ruins of the Coliseum in Rome.

The Colosseum at Rome was the greatest of Roman ampitheatres.

Colosseum at Rome

The Colosseum at Rome was the greatest of Roman ampitheatres.

This Roman console is shown in the front and side view. It is a design that includes two decorative swans found at the Vatican in Rome, Italy.

Roman Console

This Roman console is shown in the front and side view. It is a design that includes two decorative…

Emperor of Rome from 306 to 337. He is best known for being the first Christian Roman emperor.

Constantine the Great

Emperor of Rome from 306 to 337. He is best known for being the first Christian Roman emperor.

The Arch of Constantine was erected to celebrate Constantine's victory of Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge. It is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill.

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine was erected to celebrate Constantine's victory of Maxentius at the Battle of…

The consul was the highest elected office of the Roman Republic. They were elected every year. The lictors were a member of a special class of Roman civil servant. Their tasks were to attend and guard the magistrates of the Roman Republic.

Consul and Lictors

The consul was the highest elected office of the Roman Republic. They were elected every year. The lictors…

Roman Cornu. Brass instrument used by the Roman Armies to give orders in battle.

Cornu

Roman Cornu. Brass instrument used by the Roman Armies to give orders in battle.

"A musical instrument, in the shape of two half globes, which were held one in each hand of the performer, and played by being struck against each other. The cymbal was a very ancient instrument, being used in the worship of Cybele, Bacchus, Juno, and all the earlier deities of the Grecian and Roman mythology. It probably came from the east. for sistrum, which some have regerred to the class of cymbala." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Cymbalum

"A musical instrument, in the shape of two half globes, which were held one in each hand of the performer,…

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

Dacian Stronghold

A Roman siege, led by Trajan, of a Dacian stronghold, a stone wall of protection.

"A rider in the Roman games, who generally rode two horses at the same time, sitting on them without a saddle, and vaulting upon either of them at is pleasure. The annexed woodcut shows three figures of desultores." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Desultor

"A rider in the Roman games, who generally rode two horses at the same time, sitting on them without…

A coin engraved with images of Minerva and Jupiter. Minerva was the Roman equivalent to the Greek goddess Athena, and Jupiter was similar to the Greek god of thunder, Zeus.

Dieties

A coin engraved with images of Minerva and Jupiter. Minerva was the Roman equivalent to the Greek goddess…

Petrified corpse discovered at Pompeii.

Discovered Body at Pompeii

Petrified corpse discovered at Pompeii.

"A circular plate of stone or metal, made for throwing to a distance as in exercise of strength and dexterity. It was one of the principal gymnastic exercises of the ancients, being included in the Penthathlum. The preceding woodcut represents a player with the discus, and is copied from an ancient statue by Myron." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Discus

"A circular plate of stone or metal, made for throwing to a distance as in exercise of strength and…

Restoration of the column of Gaius Duilius, a Roman politician and admiral in the First Punic War.

Column of Duilius

Restoration of the column of Gaius Duilius, a Roman politician and admiral in the First Punic War.

"The column was adorned with the brazen beaks of the captured Carthaginian vessels. Part of the inscription reciting the achievements of the Roman fleet has been preserved."&mdash;Webster, 1913

Column of Duilis

"The column was adorned with the brazen beaks of the captured Carthaginian vessels. Part of the inscription…

"A bar of copper marked with the figure of a bull. Dates from the fourth century B.C."&mdash;Webster, 1913

Early Roman Bar Money

"A bar of copper marked with the figure of a bull. Dates from the fourth century B.C."—Webster,…

An Egyptian sandal, with a curved front.

Egyptian sandal

An Egyptian sandal, with a curved front.

"Soldiers Attacked while Encamping." &mdash; Greenough, 1899

Encamping

"Soldiers Attacked while Encamping." — Greenough, 1899

"The Italian city of Volterra still preserves in the Porta dell' Arco an interesting relic of Ertuscan times. The archway, one of the original gates of the ancient town, is about twenty feet in height and twelve feet in width. On the keystone and imposts are three curious heads, probably representing the guardian deities of the place."—Webster, 1913

An Ertuscan Arch

"The Italian city of Volterra still preserves in the Porta dell' Arco an interesting relic of Ertuscan…