This ClipArt gallery offers 318 images of the Roman Empire including culture, people, everyday life, coats of arms, and more.

"In Rom. antiq., bundles of rods, usually of birch, with an ax bound in with them, the blade projecting, borne by lictors before the superior Roman magistrates as a badge of their power over life and limb." -Whitney, 1911

Fasces of a Roman Magistrate

"In Rom. antiq., bundles of rods, usually of birch, with an ax bound in with them, the blade projecting,…

Musician playing a double flute

Double flute

Musician playing a double flute

Roman Foot Soldier during the Conquest of Italy

Foot Soldier

Roman Foot Soldier during the Conquest of Italy

A Roman foot soldier.

Roman foot soldier

A Roman foot soldier.

"Restoration of the Roman fortified wall on the German frontier." -Breasted, 1914

Fortified Wall

"Restoration of the Roman fortified wall on the German frontier." -Breasted, 1914

"Fortifying the Camp." — Greenough, 1899

Fortifying Camp

"Fortifying the Camp." — Greenough, 1899

"Elated by the victory, the Romans now determined to drive Carthage out of the island altogether. This, however, could not be accomplished without a fleet. Such ships as Rome possessed were old and out of date, and a wrecked Carthaginian galley was taken as a model for the new fleet." — The Delphian Society, 1913

Roman galley

"Elated by the victory, the Romans now determined to drive Carthage out of the island altogether. This,…

"Ancient Statue of Gallic Chief." — Greenough, 1899

Gallic Chief

"Ancient Statue of Gallic Chief." — Greenough, 1899

Gallic Horsemen during the Gallic Invasion (390 B.C.) upon Rome.

Gallic Horsemen

Gallic Horsemen during the Gallic Invasion (390 B.C.) upon Rome.

Iron Helmet used in the Gallic War with horns and a spiral decoration.

Gallic Iron Helmet

Iron Helmet used in the Gallic War with horns and a spiral decoration.

Iron Holder used in the Gallic War.

Gallic Iron Holder

Iron Holder used in the Gallic War.

Iron Shield Boss off of a shield used in the Gallic War.

Gallic Iron Shield Boss

Iron Shield Boss off of a shield used in the Gallic War.

Necklace worn in the Gallic war. Has amber and coral pendants.

Gallic Necklace

Necklace worn in the Gallic war. Has amber and coral pendants.

Necklace worn in the Gallic war. Has amber and coral pendants.

Gallic Necklace

Necklace worn in the Gallic war. Has amber and coral pendants.

"1 and 3, necklaces with amber and coral pendants; 2, military standard; 4, bronze trumpet; 5, iron boss of shield; 6, iron fastening; 7, sword-hilt and belt; 8, iron helmet; 9, iron belt-chain."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Gallic Remains

"1 and 3, necklaces with amber and coral pendants; 2, military standard; 4, bronze trumpet; 5, iron…

Sword-hilt and girdle used in the Gallic War.

Gallic Sword-hilt and Girdle

Sword-hilt and girdle used in the Gallic War.

Gallic soldier blowing long trumpet known as carnyx.

Gaul with Trumpet

Gallic soldier blowing long trumpet known as carnyx.

"A Mirmillo and a Retiarius." — Smith, 1873.

Gladiatores

"A Mirmillo and a Retiarius." — Smith, 1873.

"Thracians" — Smith, 1873.

Gladiatores

"Thracians" — Smith, 1873.

Roman Gladiators fighting each other in front of an audience in an arena.

Gladiators

Roman Gladiators fighting each other in front of an audience in an arena.

This illustration shows various types of gladiators, each type with with his specific weapons attributed to him.
Gladiators were swordsmen whose profession was to fight for the public amusement. Gladiators are said to have been borrowed by Rome from the Etruscans. They were first exhibited in Rome in 246 BC, primarily at funerals, but afterwards at festivals, particularly those celebrated by the aediles and other magistrates. More than ten thousand were shown at Trajan's triumph over the Dacians. They were either free-born citizens, usually of a low class, who fought for hire, or captives, slaves, or malefactors, and were kept in schools, where they were carefully trained. Chief varieties were Andabatae, who wore helmets with no openings for the eyes, so that their blindfold movements provoked the spectators' mirth; Mirmillones, who used Gallic weapons, sword and shield; Retiarii, who carried a net and a three-pronged lance -- the net to entangle their opponents; and Thraces, who, like the Thracians, used a short sword and a round buckler. 
When a gladiator was severely wounded and defeated, the people cried out 'Habet' (He has it), and he lowered his arms; then, if the spectators wished his life to be spared, they turned their thumbs down; but it they desired his death, they turned them up. These combats were often attended by great cruelty and callousness on the part of the spectators; sometimes they were fights à outrance, none being spared alive. Discharged gladiators were presented with a rudis, or wooden sword, and hence were called rudiarii. Gladiatorial combats were disliked by the Greeks, and practically never took place in Greek cities.

Gladiators

This illustration shows various types of gladiators, each type with with his specific weapons attributed…

Four Roman Gladiators with Armor.

Roman Gladiators

Four Roman Gladiators with Armor.

A harbor from the era of the Roman Empire.

An Ancient Harbor

A harbor from the era of the Roman Empire.

Military formation of the Romans, also agmen quadratum. Square formation with no troops in the middle.

Hollow Square

Military formation of the Romans, also agmen quadratum. Square formation with no troops in the middle.

A poster of important images and facts about the Holy Roman Empire.

Holy Roman Empire Poster

A poster of important images and facts about the Holy Roman Empire.

How Horatius kept the bridge

Horatius

How Horatius kept the bridge

"A Roman house. In early times the private houses of the Romans were very simple, showing little attempt at adornment or luxury, but in the later days of the republic and under the empire, the dwellings of the wealthy were costly and beautiful."—Colby, 1899

House

"A Roman house. In early times the private houses of the Romans were very simple, showing little attempt…

Ancient household utensils from Pompeii

Household Utensils

Ancient household utensils from Pompeii

"[Caesar] mustered the soldiers in the Campius Martius, and requested a statement of their grievances. Their demands appeared to have a reference to a payment of their dues, the bestowal of promised presents, and a release from further duty. Caesar well knew that the best way to humiliate an insurrection is to grant what it clamors for. He accordingly made an address to his old legion, being careful to begin with "Citizens," instead of "Soldiers." This was gall and wormwood. To be addressed as citizens by their beloved commander! "I discharge you." said he. "You have had enough of fatigue and wounds. I release you from your oath. As to your presents, you shall be paid to the last sesterce." The old veterans could stand no more. They burst into tears, and began to beg for forgiveness. With a certain prudent hesitation, Caesar received them back to favor; but he took care that the leaders who had fomented the mutiny should be executed."—Ridpath, 1885

Citizens! I Discharge You.

"[Caesar] mustered the soldiers in the Campius Martius, and requested a statement of their grievances.…

A depiction of Julian the Apostate, a noted philosopher and Roman Emperor, and his death.

Death of Julian the Apostate

A depiction of Julian the Apostate, a noted philosopher and Roman Emperor, and his death.

Kitchen Furniture at Pompeii.

Kitchen Furniture at Pompeii

Kitchen Furniture at Pompeii.

Silver krater from Hildesheim.

Silver Krater

Silver krater from Hildesheim.

A laboratory as found in Pompeii.

Laboratory, Ancient

A laboratory as found in Pompeii.

"The Legionary." — Greenough, 1899

Legionary

"The Legionary." — Greenough, 1899

"Arms of Leo X (Medici)." — Young, 1901

Arms of Leo X

"Arms of Leo X (Medici)." — Young, 1901

Lictors were guards of magistrates who carried fasces to show power to execute.

Lictors with Fasces

Lictors were guards of magistrates who carried fasces to show power to execute.

"Light-armed Soldier." — Greenough, 1899

Light Soldier

"Light-armed Soldier." — Greenough, 1899

"The litter consists of an ordinary couch with four posts and a pair of posts. Curtains fastened to the rod above the canopy shielded the occupant from observation."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Litter

"The litter consists of an ordinary couch with four posts and a pair of posts. Curtains fastened to…

"Soldiers Making Camp." — Greenough, 1899

Making Camp

"Soldiers Making Camp." — Greenough, 1899

An illustration of a man and woman standing in typical Roman clothing. Clothing in ancient Rome generally consisted of the toga, the stola, brooches for these, and breeches. The toga, a distinctive garment of Ancient Rome, was a sash of perhaps twenty feet (6 meters) in length which was wrapped around the body and was generally worn over a tunic. The stola was the traditional garment of Roman women, corresponding to the toga that was worn by men. In ancient Rome, it was considered disgraceful for a woman to wear a toga; wearing the male garment was associated with prostitution. The stola was a long, pleated dress, worn over a tunic. A brooch (also known in ancient times as a fibula) is a decorative jewelry item designed to be attached to garments. It is usually made of metal, often silver or gold but sometimes bronze or some other material.

Man and Woman in Roman Clothing

An illustration of a man and woman standing in typical Roman clothing. Clothing in ancient Rome generally…

An ancient marble table that was found at Pimpeii.

Marble Table

An ancient marble table that was found at Pimpeii.

"Marcus Aurelius receiving the submission of German captives. (From a Bas-relief in the Capitoline Museum, Rome.)" -Allen, 1890

Marcus Aurelius and German Captives

"Marcus Aurelius receiving the submission of German captives. (From a Bas-relief in the Capitoline Museum,…

"Equestrian state of Marcus Aurelius." — Young, 1901

Statue of Marcus Aurelius

"Equestrian state of Marcus Aurelius." — Young, 1901

One of the world's earliest sewage system, located in ancient Rome.

Cloaca Maxima

One of the world's earliest sewage system, located in ancient Rome.

An ancient chariot racing stadium used during the Roman Empire.

Circus Maximus

An ancient chariot racing stadium used during the Roman Empire.

A medal of Abila, representing the head of Faustina, wife of emperor Marcus Aurelius on one side. The other side depicts a bunch of grapes with the inscription LEUK ABILA and the date 236.

Medal of Abila

A medal of Abila, representing the head of Faustina, wife of emperor Marcus Aurelius on one side. The…

A medal engraved with the portrait of Empress Plautina, her name inscribed on one side. The other side depicts Gabenon of Gaba; either <i>Gabe</i> in Syria, or <i>Geba</i> in Judea.

Medal of Geba

A medal engraved with the portrait of Empress Plautina, her name inscribed on one side. The other side…

One side of the medal is engraved with the portrait of Proserpine, who was worshiped in Sardis.  The reverse shows her being carried by Pluto, whose horses are being directed by a cupid. Under their feet lies an overturned urn; a serpent is also present in the tableau.

Medal of Sardis

One side of the medal is engraved with the portrait of Proserpine, who was worshiped in Sardis. The…

A man's sandal from the Roman era.

Men sandal

A man's sandal from the Roman era.

Roman soldiers breaking into the German camp.

Milites Nostri in Castra Inruperunt

Roman soldiers breaking into the German camp.

Two Roman As, or mite, a denomination of Roman currency.

Mite

Two Roman As, or mite, a denomination of Roman currency.

Augustulus is deposed from the crown by Odoacer, and was thus the last Western Roman Emperor.

Odoacer Compels Augustulus to Yield the Crown

Augustulus is deposed from the crown by Odoacer, and was thus the last Western Roman Emperor.

"Oppugnatio." &mdash; Greenough, 1899

Oppugnatio

"Oppugnatio." — Greenough, 1899

"A thick cloak, cheifly used by the Romans in traveling, instead of the toga, as a protection against the cold and rain. It appears to have had no sleeves, and only an opening for the head, as shown in the preceding figure." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Paenula

"A thick cloak, cheifly used by the Romans in traveling, instead of the toga, as a protection against…

"The spade was but little used in ancient husbandry, the ground having been broken and turned over by the plough, and also by the use of large hoes and rakes. The preceding woodcut, taken a deceased countryman with his falx and bidens, and also with a pala, modified by the addition of a strong cross-bar, by the use of which he was enabled to drive it nearly twice as deep into the ground, as he could have done without it." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pala

"The spade was but little used in ancient husbandry, the ground having been broken and turned over by…

"An outer garment. The English cloak, though commonly adopted as the translation of these terms, conveys no accurate conception of the form, material, or use of that which they denoted. The article designated by them was always a rectangular piece of cloth, exactly, or at least nearly square. It was indeed used in the very form in which it was taken from the loom, being made entirely by the weaver, without and aid from the tailor except to repair the injuries which it sustained by time. Whatever additional richness and beauty it received from the art of the dyer, " &mdash; Smith, 1873

Pallium

"An outer garment. The English cloak, though commonly adopted as the translation of these terms, conveys…

"The cloak worn by a Roman general commanding an army, his principal officers and personal attendants, in contradistinction to the sagum of the common soldiers, and the toga or garb of peace. It was the practice for a Roman magistrate, after he had received imperium from the comitia curiata and offered up his vows in the capitol, to march out of the city arrayed in the paludamentum, attended by his lictors in similar attire, nor could he again enter the gates undil he had formally divested himself of this emblem of military power. The paludamentum was open in front, reached down to the knees or a litle lower, and hung loosely over the shoulders, being fastened across the chest by a clasp. The colour of the paludamentum was commonly white or purple, and hence it was marked and remembered that Crassus no the morning of the fatal battle of carrhae went forth in a dark-coloured mantle." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Paludamentum

"The cloak worn by a Roman general commanding an army, his principal officers and personal attendants,…

"A round shield, three feet in diameter, carried by the celites in the Roman army. Though small, compared with the Clipeus, it was so strongly made as to be a very effectual protection. This was probably owing to the use of iron in its framework. The parma was also worn by the cavalry. We find the term parma often applied to the target (Cetra), which was also a small round shield, and therefore very similar to the parma. The preceding cut represents a votive parma, embossed and gilt, representing onits border, as is supposed the taking of Rome by the Gauls under Brennus, and its recovery by Camillus." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Parma

"A round shield, three feet in diameter, carried by the celites in the Roman army. Though small, compared…

This painting is by Andrea Mantegna is a good example of how the artist placed the figures in the background. The people seem to flow together in his work. The painting can now be found Hampton Court in Kensington Palace.

Part of the Triumphs of Julius Cesar

This painting is by Andrea Mantegna is a good example of how the artist placed the figures in the background.…

Silver patera from Hildesheim.

Silver Patera

Silver patera from Hildesheim.