This ClipArt gallery offers 377 images of the Roman Empire including culture, people, everyday life, coats of arms, and more. See also the Roman Coins, Roman Architecture, Roman Ornament, Roman Mythology, and Ancient Roman Musical Instruments ClipArt galleries.

A cavlaryman of Cæsar's army during the Roman Republic.

Roman Cavalryman

A cavlaryman of Cæsar's army during the Roman Republic.

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass.

Roman cuirass

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass.

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass with scale armor.

Roman cuirass

Roman soldier wearing a cuirass with scale armor.

"Eagle, as a military standard, was adopted by the Romans, and even by nations preceding them in history. The Persians, in the time of Cyrus the Younger, bore an eagle on a spear as a standard. The Romans for some time used the eagle, the wolf, the boar, the horse, and the minotaur for standards, but afterwards abandoned the last four, and confined themselves to the first." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Roman Eagle

"Eagle, as a military standard, was adopted by the Romans, and even by nations preceding them in history.…

"This ship lies besides the wharf at Ostia. In the afterpart of the vessel is a cabin with two windows. Notice the figure of Victory on the top of the single mast and the decoration of the mainsail with the wolf and twins. The ship is steered by a pair of huge paddles."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Freight Ship

"This ship lies besides the wharf at Ostia. In the afterpart of the vessel is a cabin with two windows.…

A Roman Galley with three banks of oars.

Roman Galley

A Roman Galley with three banks of oars.

An illustration of a Roman galley from the Roman empire.

Roman Galley

An illustration of a Roman galley from the Roman empire.

The spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

The attaching point for the spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The attaching point for the spear point of the Roman javelin, or pila.

The Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The Roman javelin, or pila.

The Roman javelin, or pila.

Roman Javelin

The Roman javelin, or pila.

A lamp used by the ancient Romans for light.

Roman Lamp

A lamp used by the ancient Romans for light.

"From a monument of the imperial age. The soldier wears a metal helmet, a leather doublet with shoulder-pieces, a metal-plated belt, and a sword hanging from a strap thrown over the left shoulder. His left hand holds a large shield, his right, a heavy javelin."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Legionary

"From a monument of the imperial age. The soldier wears a metal helmet, a leather doublet with shoulder-pieces,…

Roman Pack-wagons and carts carrying goods being drawn by horses.

Roman Pack-wagons

Roman Pack-wagons and carts carrying goods being drawn by horses.

A Roman gladiator-style sandal.

Roman sandal

A Roman gladiator-style sandal.

A Roman School

Roman School

A Roman School

A scene from a Roman wall painting.

Roman School Scene

A scene from a Roman wall painting.

"Roman Battle Ship." — Greenough, 1899

Roman Ship

"Roman Battle Ship." — Greenough, 1899

A Roman Siege Works, with A and B, a double wall; C, C, C, Vineæ; D, an Agger; E, a movable tower; F, a ditch.

Roman Siege Works

A Roman Siege Works, with A and B, a double wall; C, C, C, Vineæ; D, an Agger; E, a movable tower;…

A projectile weapon used to throw a blunt projectile.

A Roman Slinger

A projectile weapon used to throw a blunt projectile.

Roman soldiers with spears and shields.

Roman Soldiers

Roman soldiers with spears and shields.

The distinction between rank and unit type doesn't seem to have been as precise as in a modern-day army, in which a soldier has a separate pay-grade, job description, and assigned unit.

Roman Soldiers

The distinction between rank and unit type doesn't seem to have been as precise as in a modern-day army,…

"1, funditor; 2, 2, milites levis armaturae; 3, 3, legionarii; 4, sarcina."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Roman Soldiers and Equipment

"1, funditor; 2, 2, milites levis armaturae; 3, 3, legionarii; 4, sarcina."—D'ooge & Eastman,…

"From a gravestone of the first century A.D. The standard consists of a spear crowned with a wreath, below which is a crossbar bearing pendant acorns. Then follow, in order, a metal disk. Jupiter's eagle standing on a thunderbolt, a crescent moon, an amulet, and a large tassel."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Standard Bearer

"From a gravestone of the first century A.D. The standard consists of a spear crowned with a wreath,…

Group of Roman standards.

Roman Standards

Group of Roman standards.

Roman Sword or gladii. In sheath decorated with carvings.

Roman Sword

Roman Sword or gladii. In sheath decorated with carvings.

"The best preserved of Roman temples. Located at Nimes in southern France, where it is known as La Maison Carree ("the square house"). The structure is now used as a museum of antiquities."—Webster, 1913

A Roman Temple

"The best preserved of Roman temples. Located at Nimes in southern France, where it is known as La Maison…

"The Roman soldiers seem to have used two sorts of tents, one, a tent proper, of canvas or some analogous material, and constructed with two solid upright poles, and a roof piece between them; the other more resembling a light hut, of a wooden skeleton, covered by bark, hides, mud, straw, or any material which afforded warmth." — Chambers, 1881

Roman Tent

"The Roman soldiers seem to have used two sorts of tents, one, a tent proper, of canvas or some analogous…

"Roman Transports." — Greenough, 1899

Roman Transports

"Roman Transports." — Greenough, 1899

Marble hydria from Pompeii.

Roman Vase

Marble hydria from Pompeii.

Underside of silver vase, Hildesheim Treasure.

Roman Vase

Underside of silver vase, Hildesheim Treasure.

An ancient Roman villa.

A Roman Villa

An ancient Roman villa.

A Roman warship.

Roman Warship

A Roman warship.

Writing materials from the Roman empire.

Roman Writing Materials

Writing materials from the Roman empire.

A small cubed marked on its faces with spots numbering from one to six, used in gaming from being thrown from a box or hand.

Roman Die

A small cubed marked on its faces with spots numbering from one to six, used in gaming from being thrown…

"A, via principalis. B, via documana. C, porta praetoria. D, porta decumana. E, portq principalis dextra. F, porta principalis sinistra. G, praetorium. H, forum. K,K, tribuni. L, auxilia. M, ara. N, tribunal. O, equites. P, pedites. Q, fossa. R, via quintana. S, agger. T, intervallum. V, vallum."—D'ooge & Eastman, 1917

Castra Romana

"A, via principalis. B, via documana. C, porta praetoria. D, porta decumana. E, portq principalis dextra.…

"Romans of the Augustan Age." — Quackenbos, 1882

Romans

"Romans of the Augustan Age." — Quackenbos, 1882

A poster about Rome's Republic 509-31 B.C.

Rome Poster

A poster about Rome's Republic 509-31 B.C.

A poster about the Roman Empire 31 B.C.-476 A.D.

Rome Poster

A poster about the Roman Empire 31 B.C.-476 A.D.

A poster about the Rome's social customs.

Rome Poster

A poster about the Rome's social customs.

A poster about Rome's "Legendary Period" 753-509 B.C.

Rome Poster

A poster about Rome's "Legendary Period" 753-509 B.C.

"Constructed by Aurelian and rebuilt by Honorius. The material is concrete faced with brick; thickness, 13 feet; greatest height, 58 feet. This is still the wall of the modern city, although at present no effort is made to keep it in repair."—Webster, 1913

The Wall of Rome

"Constructed by Aurelian and rebuilt by Honorius. The material is concrete faced with brick; thickness,…

An image of Julius Caesar and his army crossing the Rubicon River, which is located in northeastern Italy. The idiom "Crossing the Rubicon" refers to Julius Caesar passing this river in 49 BC, and means to pass a point of no return.

Caesar Crossing the Rubicon

An image of Julius Caesar and his army crossing the Rubicon River, which is located in northeastern…

First walls discovered in Pompeii.

Ruins

First walls discovered in Pompeii.

"The sagum was open in the front, and usually fastened across the shoulders by a clasp. The form of the sagum worn by the northern nations of Europe may be seen in the following cut from the column of Trajan, representing three Sarmatians with saga." — Anthon, 1891

Sagum

"The sagum was open in the front, and usually fastened across the shoulders by a clasp. The form of…

Saint Augustine, bishop of Hippo in Africa, sits among various other clergy and teaches from his writings. He is dressed in a bishop's cassock. His head is surrounded by a halo. Some of the men surrounding him are holding books.

Saint Augustine of Hippo Teaches from His Writings

Saint Augustine, bishop of Hippo in Africa, sits among various other clergy and teaches from his writings.…

"A harp, was of oriental origin. The performances of sambucistriae were only known to the early Romans as luxuries brought over from Asia." — Smith, 1873

Sambuca

"A harp, was of oriental origin. The performances of sambucistriae were only known to the early Romans…

"Saracen Arms. Charlemagne now had to deal with certain non-Germanic peoples who were threatening his borders. These were the Saracens, Slavs, and Avars. The Mohammedan Saracens, or Moors, had gained possession of the whole of Spain, but there were still small fragments of the ancient Visigothic kingdom in the north. It was to save these little Christian states from their Mohammedan oppressors, as well as to round out the limits of his own kingdom, that Charlemagne undertook a campaign against the Saracens."—Colby, 1899

Saracen Arms

"Saracen Arms. Charlemagne now had to deal with certain non-Germanic peoples who were threatening his…

"Soldiers Marching with Packs (sarcinae)." — Greenough, 1899

Sarcinae

"Soldiers Marching with Packs (sarcinae)." — Greenough, 1899

"Etruscan Sarcophagus, Late Style." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Sarcophagus

"Etruscan Sarcophagus, Late Style." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"Sarcophagus, plural Sarcophagi, is a kind of stone used among the Greeks for making coffins, and so called because it was believed to have the property of consuming the flesh of dead bodies deposited in it within a few weeks. Hence a coffin or tomb of stone; a kind of stone chest used for containing a dead body. In modern times stone coffins are occasionally used for royal or distinguished persons."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Sarcophagus of Scipio

"Sarcophagus, plural Sarcophagi, is a kind of stone used among the Greeks for making coffins, and so…

Sarcophagus of Lucius Cornelius Scipio Barbatus, an elected Roman consul in 298 BC.

Sarcophagus of Scipio Barbatus

Sarcophagus of Lucius Cornelius Scipio Barbatus, an elected Roman consul in 298 BC.

Scales found at Pompeii

Scales

Scales found at Pompeii

"Scorpio." — Greenough, 1899

Scorpio

"Scorpio." — Greenough, 1899

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

A Roman scutum shield.

Roman scutum

A Roman scutum shield.

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state. Curulis is derived by the ancient writers from currus, but it more probably contains the same root as curia. The sella curulis is said to have been used at Rome from a very remote period as an emblem of kingly power, having been imported, along with various other insignia of royalty, from Etruria. Under the republic the right of sitting upon this chair belonged to the consuls, praetors, curule aediles, and censors; to the flamen dialis; to the dictator, and to those whom he deputed to act under himself, as the magister equitum, since he might be said to comprehend all magistracies within himself. After the downfall of the constitution, it was assigned to the emperors also, or to their statues in their absence." — Smith, 1873

Sella

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state.…