This ClipArt gallery offers 318 images of the Roman Empire including culture, people, everyday life, coats of arms, and more.

"A harp, was of oriental origin. The performances of sambucistriae were only known to the early Romans as luxuries brought over from Asia." — Smith, 1873

Sambuca

"A harp, was of oriental origin. The performances of sambucistriae were only known to the early Romans…

"Saracen Arms. Charlemagne now had to deal with certain non-Germanic peoples who were threatening his borders. These were the Saracens, Slavs, and Avars. The Mohammedan Saracens, or Moors, had gained possession of the whole of Spain, but there were still small fragments of the ancient Visigothic kingdom in the north. It was to save these little Christian states from their Mohammedan oppressors, as well as to round out the limits of his own kingdom, that Charlemagne undertook a campaign against the Saracens."—Colby, 1899

Saracen Arms

"Saracen Arms. Charlemagne now had to deal with certain non-Germanic peoples who were threatening his…

"Soldiers Marching with Packs (sarcinae)." — Greenough, 1899

Sarcinae

"Soldiers Marching with Packs (sarcinae)." — Greenough, 1899

"Sarcophagus, plural Sarcophagi, is a kind of stone used among the Greeks for making coffins, and so called because it was believed to have the property of consuming the flesh of dead bodies deposited in it within a few weeks. Hence a coffin or tomb of stone; a kind of stone chest used for containing a dead body. In modern times stone coffins are occasionally used for royal or distinguished persons."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Sarcophagus of Scipio

"Sarcophagus, plural Sarcophagi, is a kind of stone used among the Greeks for making coffins, and so…

Sarcophagus of Lucius Cornelius Scipio Barbatus, an elected Roman consul in 298 BC.

Sarcophagus of Scipio Barbatus

Sarcophagus of Lucius Cornelius Scipio Barbatus, an elected Roman consul in 298 BC.

Scales found at Pompeii

Scales

Scales found at Pompeii

"Scorpio." — Greenough, 1899

Scorpio

"Scorpio." — Greenough, 1899

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

Scutum

The scutum was a semi-cylindrical shield used by ancient Roman legionaries.

A Roman scutum shield.

Roman scutum

A Roman scutum shield.

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state. Curulis is derived by the ancient writers from currus, but it more probably contains the same root as curia. The sella curulis is said to have been used at Rome from a very remote period as an emblem of kingly power, having been imported, along with various other insignia of royalty, from Etruria. Under the republic the right of sitting upon this chair belonged to the consuls, praetors, curule aediles, and censors; to the flamen dialis; to the dictator, and to those whom he deputed to act under himself, as the magister equitum, since he might be said to comprehend all magistracies within himself. After the downfall of the constitution, it was assigned to the emperors also, or to their statues in their absence." — Smith, 1873

Sella

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state.…

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state. Curulis is derived by the ancient writers from currus, but it more probably contains the same root as curia. The sella curulis is said to have been used at Rome from a very remote period as an emblem of kingly power, having been imported, along with various other insignia of royalty, from Etruria. Under the republic the right of sitting upon this chair belonged to the consuls, praetors, curule aediles, and censors; to the flamen dialis; to the dictator, and to those whom he deputed to act under himself, as the magister equitum, since he might be said to comprehend all magistracies within himself. After the downfall of the constitution, it was assigned to the emperors also, or to their statues in their absence." — Smith, 1873

Sella

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state.…

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state. Curulis is derived by the ancient writers from currus, but it more probably contains the same root as curia. The sella curulis is said to have been used at Rome from a very remote period as an emblem of kingly power, having been imported, along with various other insignia of royalty, from Etruria. Under the republic the right of sitting upon this chair belonged to the consuls, praetors, curule aediles, and censors; to the flamen dialis; to the dictator, and to those whom he deputed to act under himself, as the magister equitum, since he might be said to comprehend all magistracies within himself. After the downfall of the constitution, it was assigned to the emperors also, or to their statues in their absence." — Smith, 1873

Sella

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state.…

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state. Curulis is derived by the ancient writers from currus, but it more probably contains the same root as curia. The sella curulis is said to have been used at Rome from a very remote period as an emblem of kingly power, having been imported, along with various other insignia of royalty, from Etruria. Under the republic the right of sitting upon this chair belonged to the consuls, praetors, curule aediles, and censors; to the flamen dialis; to the dictator, and to those whom he deputed to act under himself, as the magister equitum, since he might be said to comprehend all magistracies within himself. After the downfall of the constitution, it was assigned to the emperors also, or to their statues in their absence." — Smith, 1873

Sella

"Sella, the general term for a seat or chair of any description. Sella Curulis, the chair of state.…

An illustration of two lictors, members of a special class of Roman civil servants. Lictors had special tasks of attending and guarding magistrates of the Roman Republic and Empire who held imperium; essentially, a bodyguard. The origin of the tradition of lictors goes back to the time when Rome was a kingdom, perhaps acquired from their Etruscan neighbours.

Roman Civil Servants

An illustration of two lictors, members of a special class of Roman civil servants. Lictors had special…

Roman Shipbuilder at work with tool.

Roman Shipbuilder

Roman Shipbuilder at work with tool.

"View of Siege Works." — Greenough, 1899

Siege Works

"View of Siege Works." — Greenough, 1899

"Plan of Siege Works." — Greenough, 1899

Siege Works

"Plan of Siege Works." — Greenough, 1899

"Signa Militaria, military ensigns or standards. The most ancient standard employed by the Romans is said to have been a handful of straw fixed to the top of a spear or pole. Hence the company of soldiers belonging to it was called Manipulus. The bundle of hay or fern was soon succeeded by the figures of animals, viz. the eagle, the wolf, the minotaur, the horse, and the boar. These appear to have corresponded to the five divisions of the Roman army." — Smith, 1873

Signa Militaria

"Signa Militaria, military ensigns or standards. The most ancient standard employed by the Romans is…

Various standards of military units of Rome in the Gallic War.

Signa Militaria

Various standards of military units of Rome in the Gallic War.

"Walls of Signia. The colony of Signia was said to have been founded by the last Tarquin; but its possession was lost in the early years of the republic." -Allen, 1890

Walls of Signia

"Walls of Signia. The colony of Signia was said to have been founded by the last Tarquin; but its possession…

"Signifer." — Greenough, 1899

Signifer

"Signifer." — Greenough, 1899

"Signum." — Greenough, 1899

Signum

"Signum." — Greenough, 1899

"A runaway slave, if recaptured, was sometimes compelled to wear a metal collar riveted about his neck."—Webster, 1913

A Slave's Collar

"A runaway slave, if recaptured, was sometimes compelled to wear a metal collar riveted about his neck."—Webster,…

A soldier using a sling to cast stones as weapons, known as a funditor.

Slinger

A soldier using a sling to cast stones as weapons, known as a funditor.

"Slinger (funditor)." — Greenough, 1899

Slinger

"Slinger (funditor)." — Greenough, 1899

Ancient Middle Eastern slipper.

Slipper

Ancient Middle Eastern slipper.

A Roman soldier

Soldier

A Roman soldier

A Roman soldier

Soldier

A Roman soldier

A Roman soldier

Soldier

A Roman soldier

A soldier of the Roman Empire.

Light-Armed Soldier

A soldier of the Roman Empire.

The armor worn by ancient Roman emperors and generals.

Roman soldier

The armor worn by ancient Roman emperors and generals.

A Roman soldier.

Roman soldier

A Roman soldier.

Soldiers standing at a gate

Soldiers

Soldiers standing at a gate

"Soldiers Foraging." — Greenough, 1899

Soldiers Foraging

"Soldiers Foraging." — Greenough, 1899

"Statue of St Peter in the Bascilica." — Young, 1901

Statue of St Peter

"Statue of St Peter in the Bascilica." — Young, 1901

Saint Columba was an outstanding figure among the Gaelic missionary monks who, some of his advocates claim, introduced Christianity to the Kingdom of the Picts during the Early Medieval Period. He was one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland.

St. Columba at Oronsay

Saint Columba was an outstanding figure among the Gaelic missionary monks who, some of his advocates…

"A female dress worn over the tunic; it came as low as the ankles or feet, and was fastened round the body by a girdle, leaving above the breast broad folds. The tunic did not reach much below the knee, but the essential distinction between the tunic and stole seems to have been, that the latter always had an institia or flounce sewed to the bottom and reaching to the instep. Over the stole the palla or pallium was worn, as we see in the cut annexed." — Smith, 1873

Stola

"A female dress worn over the tunic; it came as low as the ankles or feet, and was fastened round the…

A brooch popular during Saxon times.

Stone Quoit

A brooch popular during Saxon times.

Four stringils in which the hollow for collecting the oil or perspiration from the body may be observed.

Four Stringils

Four stringils in which the hollow for collecting the oil or perspiration from the body may be observed.

A Roman rider battling a Sueve. Suevi were Germanic people that posed a threat to the Romans.

Sueve and Roman Rider

A Roman rider battling a Sueve. Suevi were Germanic people that posed a threat to the Romans.

The suovetaurilia was a sacred Roman sacrifice of a pig, a ram, and a bull to Mars, the god of war to purify the land.

Suovetaurilia

The suovetaurilia was a sacred Roman sacrifice of a pig, a ram, and a bull to Mars, the god of war to…

"The relief pictures an ancient Italian sacrifice of a bull, a ram, and a boar, offered to Mars to secure purification from sin. Note the sacred laurel trees, the two altars, and the officiating magistrate, whose head is covered with the toga. He is sprinkling incense from a box held by an attendant. Another attendant carries a ewer with the libation. In the rear is the sacrificer with his ax."—Webster, 1913

Suovetaurilia

"The relief pictures an ancient Italian sacrifice of a bull, a ram, and a boar, offered to Mars to secure…

"Loading Boats with Supplies." — Greenough, 1899

Supply Boats

"Loading Boats with Supplies." — Greenough, 1899

"Tabernaculum." — Greenough, 1899

Tabernaculum

"Tabernaculum." — Greenough, 1899

"Tela, a loom. Although weaving was among the Greeks and Romans a distinct trade, carried on by a separate class of persons, yet every considerable domestic establishment, especially in the country, contained a loom, together with the whole apparatus necessary for the working of wool. These occupations were all supposed to be carried on under the protection of Athena or Minerva, specially denominated Ergane. When the farm or the palace was sufficiently large to admit of it, a portion of it called the histon or textrinum, was devoted to this purpose. The work was there principally carried on by female slaves, under the superintendence of the mistress of the house." &mdash Smith; 1873

Tela

"Tela, a loom. Although weaving was among the Greeks and Romans a distinct trade, carried on by a separate…

"Tela, a loom. Although weaving was among the Greeks and Romans a distinct trade, carried on by a separate class of persons, yet every considerable domestic establishment, especially in the country, contained a loom, together with the whole apparatus necessary for the working of wool. These occupations were all supposed to be carried on under the protection of Athena or Minerva, specially denominated Ergane. When the farm or the palace was sufficiently large to admit of it, a portion of it called the histon or textrinum, was devoted to this purpose. The work was there principally carried on by female slaves, under the superintendence of the mistress of the house." &mdash Smith; 1873

Tela

"Tela, a loom. Although weaving was among the Greeks and Romans a distinct trade, carried on by a separate…

Temple of the Sun at Rome.

Temple of the Sun

Temple of the Sun at Rome.

"Testudo." — Greenough, 1899

Testudo

"Testudo." — Greenough, 1899

"A relief from the Column of Trajan, Rome. The name testudo, a tortoise (shell), was applied to the covering made by a body of soldiers who placed their shields over their heads. The shields fitted so closely together that men could walk on them and even horses and chariots could be driven over them."—Webster, 1913

A Testudo

"A relief from the Column of Trajan, Rome. The name testudo, a tortoise (shell), was applied to the…

Teutoboch was a legendary king of the Teutons, a Germanic tribe.

The Capture of Teutoboch

Teutoboch was a legendary king of the Teutons, a Germanic tribe.

"Toga, a gown, the name of the principal outer garment worn by the romans, seems to have been received by them from the Etruscans. The toga was the peculiar distinction of the Romans, who were thence called togats or gens togata. It was originally worn only in Rome itself, and the use of it was forbidden alike to exiles and to foreigners. Gradually, however, it went out of common use, and was supplanted by the pallium and lacerna, or else it was worn in public under the lacerna. But it was still used by the upper classes, who regarded it as an honourable distinction, in the courts of justice, by clients when they received the Sportula, and in the theatre or at the games, at least when the emperor was present." &mdash Smith; 1873

Toga

"Toga, a gown, the name of the principal outer garment worn by the romans, seems to have been received…

"The following cuts represent, the first more ancient, and the second the later mode of wearing the toga." — Anthon, 1891

Roman Togas

"The following cuts represent, the first more ancient, and the second the later mode of wearing the…

"The romans had no knowledge of gunpowder, siege cannon, or field guns; but the place of modern artillery was supplied by what in general were called tormenta. These were powerful engines for hurling missiles, the propelling force being furnished by the twisting of rope, sinews, or hair. They were used in siege operations rather than in ordinary battle."

Tormenta Within a Fortified Camp

"The romans had no knowledge of gunpowder, siege cannon, or field guns; but the place of modern artillery…

Gallic Torques were heavy necklaces of braided metal. Gauls carried their wealth in the form of Gold Torques which they wore around their necks.

Gallic Torques

Gallic Torques were heavy necklaces of braided metal. Gauls carried their wealth in the form of Gold…

"The column was originally surmounted by a colossal statue of Trajan (replaced in the seventh century by one of St. Peter), and contains no less than 2500 human figures and a great number of horses." —D'Anvers, 1895

Relief of Trajan Column

"The column was originally surmounted by a colossal statue of Trajan (replaced in the seventh century…

An opulent apartment in Pompeii.

Triclinium

An opulent apartment in Pompeii.

Bronze tripod in the Berlin Museum.

Bronze Tripod

Bronze tripod in the Berlin Museum.