The ClipArt gallery of Miscellaneous Ship Illustrations offers 129 views of nautical tools and instruments, rigging, ship ornament, and practices.

"The stern of a ship, also the gunwale of a ship, the extremity of a ship's beak."-Whitney, 1902

Acrostolium

"The stern of a ship, also the gunwale of a ship, the extremity of a ship's beak."-Whitney, 1902

An anchor which is an instrument used for retaining a ship in a particular spot.  a, a, stock; b, shank; c, c, flukes; d, d, arms.

Anchor

An anchor which is an instrument used for retaining a ship in a particular spot. a, a, stock; b, shank;…

"The bow or clevis, with two eyes and a screwbolt, or bolt and key, which is used for securing a cable to the ring of the anchor."-Whitney, 1902

Anchor Shackles

"The bow or clevis, with two eyes and a screwbolt, or bolt and key, which is used for securing a cable…

"An Anchor. The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron, and its form resembled that of the modern anchor. Galley with the Cable to which the Anchor is attached passing through the Oculus in the Prow." — Smith, 1873

Ancora

"An Anchor. The anchor used by the ancients was for the most part made of iron, and its form resembled…

"The ornament rising above the stern of ancient ships."-Whitney, 1902

Aplustre

"The ornament rising above the stern of ancient ships."-Whitney, 1902

US Navy ship: Atlanta.

Atlanta

US Navy ship: Atlanta.

"The dredges on this pattern, used in Britain for ten years after their first introduction, about the year 1838, were usually small and rather heavy, not more than 12 to 15 inches in length, by 4 or 4.5 inches in width at the mouth. Two scrapers, the length of the dredge-frame, and 1.5 to 2 inches wide, were set at an angle of about 110 degrees to the plane of the dredge's mouth, so that when the dredge was gently hauled along it took hold of the ground and secured anything loose on its surface." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Ball's Naturalists' Dredge

"The dredges on this pattern, used in Britain for ten years after their first introduction, about the…

"A Binnacle, corrupted from bittacle, a wooden case or box in which the compass on board a ship is kept to protect it from injury."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Binnacle

"A Binnacle, corrupted from bittacle, a wooden case or box in which the compass on board a ship is kept…

A wooden case or box in which the compass on board a ship is kept to protect it from injury. A light is placed within it at night to insure that its indications are seen. It is placed immediately in front of the wheel or steering apparatus, and secured to the deck, usually by metal stays. The after portion has glass windows, so that the compass is at all times visible to the helmsman, who stands at the wheel.

Binnacle

A wooden case or box in which the compass on board a ship is kept to protect it from injury. A light…

Bell.

Boat trip

Bell.

A collapsible boat includes a skeleton and an impervious skin tensioned about the skeleton. The skeleton includes a plurality of longitudinal and transverse frame members forming stringers and former, the frame members being attached to the gunwale frame of the boat and the transverse members being turn able relative to the gunwale frame. The flexible skin is permanently attached to the gunwale frame and the longitudinal frame members are hinge connected to the gunwale frame at front and rear portions thereof. The longitudinal members are turn able relative to the gunwale frame in a direction transversely of the boat, and the longitudinal frame members along their horizontal portion each being provided with one or more hinge members turn able through an angle of 180°.

Collapsible Boat

A collapsible boat includes a skeleton and an impervious skin tensioned about the skeleton. The skeleton…

A small boat with mortar.

A Mortar Boat

A small boat with mortar.

Brooklyn, a US navy ship.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn, a US navy ship.

A life buoy, is a life saving buoy designed to be thrown to a person in the water, to provide buoyancy, to prevent drowning.

Life Buoy

A life buoy, is a life saving buoy designed to be thrown to a person in the water, to provide buoyancy,…

A machine used for raising anchors on ships.

Capstan

A machine used for raising anchors on ships.

"The capstan, in universal use, on board of ships, is an axle placed upright, with a head, or drum, A, pierced with holes for the levers B, C, D. The weight is drawn by the rope E, passing two or three times round the axle to prevent its slipping. This is a very powerful and convenient machine. When not in use, the levers are taken out of their places and laid aside, and when great force is required two or three men can push at each lever." —Comstock, 1850

Capstan

"The capstan, in universal use, on board of ships, is an axle placed upright, with a head, or drum,…

A captain on his ship. "At high noon every day he makes an observation, telling by the sun just where we are." -Carpenter, 1912

Captain of a Ship

A captain on his ship. "At high noon every day he makes an observation, telling by the sun just where…

A mooring swivel

Chain

A mooring swivel

A plank of considerable thickness bolted edgewise to a vessels's side, nearly abreast of a mast, and serving to extend the shrouds of the lower rigging and keeping them clear of the gunwale.

Channel

A plank of considerable thickness bolted edgewise to a vessels's side, nearly abreast of a mast, and…

"Paying out cable gear, from Chart House."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

Chart House

"Paying out cable gear, from Chart House."—E. Benjamin Andrews 1895

A cleat with no rope around it.

Cleat

A cleat with no rope around it.

A cleat with rope tied around it.

Cleat

A cleat with rope tied around it.

A type of boat made from many pieces of boards or plates which overlap one another.

Clincher

A type of boat made from many pieces of boards or plates which overlap one another.

A notched cleat on the yard arm of a vessel to facilitate hauling out the reef earings.

Cockscomb

A notched cleat on the yard arm of a vessel to facilitate hauling out the reef earings.

To wind in rings, as a rope.

Coil

To wind in rings, as a rope.

Columbia, a US navy cruiser.

Columbia

Columbia, a US navy cruiser.

Two ships at sea with a crest and lions between them.

Crest and Ships

Two ships at sea with a crest and lions between them.

A round, laterally flattened wooden block, encircled by a rope or an iron band, and pierced with three holes to recieve the lanyard, used to extend the shrouds and stays, and for other purposes.

Deadeye

A round, laterally flattened wooden block, encircled by a rope or an iron band, and pierced with three…

A round, laterally flattened wooden block, encircled by a rope or an iron band, and pierced with three holes to recieve the lanyard, used to extend the shrouds and stays, and for other purposes.

Deadeye

A round, laterally flattened wooden block, encircled by a rope or an iron band, and pierced with three…

"Upon a tripod provided with levelling screws stands the pillar P, to which is fixed the graduated azimuthal circle CC. The compass box B, with the vernier V, attached to it, moves on the azimuthal circle by means of a pivot at the pillar P. Two uprights, U, U, are fixed to the side of the compass-box, on the tops of which rests the axis of the telescope T. A graduated are A, is fixed to the bottom of one of the uprights, and the angle of elevation of the telescope is marked by the vernier on the arm E, attached to the axis of the telescope. A level, L, is also hung on the axis of the telescope, for adjusting the instrument. Inside the compass-box is another graduated circle, F, the line joining the zero-points of which is parallel to the axis of the telescope. All the fittings are in brass or copper, iron, of course, being unsuitable." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Declinometer

"Upon a tripod provided with levelling screws stands the pillar P, to which is fixed the graduated azimuthal…

"A deep-sea dredge. The iron lip of the sack scrapes shells mud, etc., into it, and small animals are caught by the "tangles."

Deep Sea Dredge

"A deep-sea dredge. The iron lip of the sack scrapes shells mud, etc., into it, and small animals are…

Dredging, the excavating or scooping out of soil, mud, sand or rock under water by a machine called a dredge. Dredging is used in deepening and widening the beds of rivers, canals, harbors. The forms of modern dredges are very numerous, different conditions requiring different forms.

Dredge

Dredging, the excavating or scooping out of soil, mud, sand or rock under water by a machine called…

"A machine used for clearing out or deepening the channels of rivers or harbors. Dredging-machines are variously constructed, the simplest being like the oyster-dredge described above, only having a perforated cowhide bag instead of the chain-net, and a stronger 'spoon' or iron mouth to the bag." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Dredge Machine

"A machine used for clearing out or deepening the channels of rivers or harbors. Dredging-machines are…

An illustration of a conical dredge being hoisted in.

Conical Dredge

An illustration of a conical dredge being hoisted in.

Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gathering up bottom sediments and disposing of them at a different location.

Excavating Purpose Dredger

Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow…

"Naut.: A strip of board with holes in it for running rigging to pass through and be kept clear, so as to be easily distinguished at night." -Whitney, 1911

Fair-Leader

"Naut.: A strip of board with holes in it for running rigging to pass through and be kept clear, so…

"Fake. Naut., one of the circles or windings of a cable or hawser as it lies in a coil; a single turn or coil, as one of the oblong loops into which a shot-line is wound in being placed in a faking-box." -Whitney, 1911

Rope Coiled in Fakes on Deck

"Fake. Naut., one of the circles or windings of a cable or hawser as it lies in a coil; a single turn…

"Elijah Galloway patented, in 1829, the Feathered Paddle-wheel, in which the floats are mounted on axes, and are connected by rods with a common center, which is made to revolve eccentrically to the axis of the paddle-wheel. By this method, the floats are kept, while immersed, at right angles to the surface of the water. So long as the water is smooth, and the immersion constant, the gain is great." — Chambers, 1881

Feathered Paddle-wheel

"Elijah Galloway patented, in 1829, the Feathered Paddle-wheel, in which the floats are mounted on axes,…

"Naut.: A square bar of wood or iron, with a shoulder at one end, used to support a topmast or topgallantmast when swayed up into place. The fid passes through a square hole in the heel of its mast, and its ends rest on the trestletrees." -Whitney, 1911

Mast Fid

"Naut.: A square bar of wood or iron, with a shoulder at one end, used to support a topmast or topgallantmast…

"A conical pin of hard wood, from 12 to 24 inches long, and from 1 to 3 inches in diameter at the butt, used to open the strands of rope in splicing." -Whitney, 1911

Setting Fid

"A conical pin of hard wood, from 12 to 24 inches long, and from 1 to 3 inches in diameter at the butt,…

"Naut., an ornament at the bow of a ship, over the cutwater, consisting of carved work in the form of a volute or scroll, resembling somewhat that at the head of a violin." -Whitney, 1911

Fiddle Head

"Naut., an ornament at the bow of a ship, over the cutwater, consisting of carved work in the form of…

"An ornamental figure, as a statue or bust, on the projecting part of the head of a ship, over the cutwater and immediately under the bowsprit." -Whitney, 1911

Figurehead of Ship

"An ornamental figure, as a statue or bust, on the projecting part of the head of a ship, over the cutwater…

Fishermen on a boat with a small boy. A sailboat can be seen in the background as well.

Fishermen

Fishermen on a boat with a small boy. A sailboat can be seen in the background as well.

A floating battery at Charleston, SC.

Floating Battery at Charleston

A floating battery at Charleston, SC.

The first American floating battery was seen in the Charles River, at Boston, in October, 1775.

The First American Floating Battery

The first American floating battery was seen in the Charles River, at Boston, in October, 1775.

"Ship's Floor. Nautical, that part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most nearly horizontal. AA, floor-plates; BBB, keelsons; FF, main frame; K, keel; LL, lightening-holes; RR, reverse frame." -Whitney, 1911

Floor of Ship

"Ship's Floor. Nautical, that part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most…

This illustration shows the basic parts and construction of a flying boat.

Flying Boat

This illustration shows the basic parts and construction of a flying boat.

"1. A horn used on board a vessel to sound a warning signal to other vessels in foggy weather. 2. A sounding instrument for warning vessels off shore during a fog. The most powerful of these instruments is the siren, or siren fog-horn." -Whitney, 1911

Brown's Siren Foghorn

"1. A horn used on board a vessel to sound a warning signal to other vessels in foggy weather. 2. A…

"Nautical: A rope extended under a yard from the middle to the yardarm, and under the jib- and spanker-booms, for the men to stand on while reefing or furling." -Whitney, 1911

Footrope of Sailing Vessel

"Nautical: A rope extended under a yard from the middle to the yardarm, and under the jib- and spanker-booms,…

"Frame of Iron Ship. A, double bottom; B, bracket frame; C, coal-bunkers; D, upper or spar deck; D', upper- or or spar-deck beam; F, main frame; H, hammock-berthing; I, inner bottom plating; K, keel; L, longitudinals; M, main deck; M', main-deck beam; P, outside plating; R, reverse frame; S, boilers; Y, protective deck; Y', protective-deck beam." -Whitney, 1911

Frame of Iron Ship

"Frame of Iron Ship. A, double bottom; B, bracket frame; C, coal-bunkers; D, upper or spar deck; D',…

"Muller gives a quaint description not very unlike that used by Hall and Forbes, only the mouth of the dredge was square, a form which, unless used with great caution, gives fatal facilities for "washing out" in the process of hauling in." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Fredrick Muller's Dredge

"Muller gives a quaint description not very unlike that used by Hall and Forbes, only the mouth of the…

USS <em>Fulton</em>, a 2455-ton center-wheel steam battery, was built at New York City to a design prepared by Robert Fulton, who called her "Demologos".

Floating Battery Fulton the First

USS Fulton, a 2455-ton center-wheel steam battery, was built at New York City to a design prepared…

USS <em>Fulton</em>, a 2455-ton center-wheel steam battery, was built at New York City to a design prepared by Robert Fulton, who called her "Demologos".

Section of the Floating Battery Fulton

USS Fulton, a 2455-ton center-wheel steam battery, was built at New York City to a design prepared…

"Iron rods leading from the futtock-plates to an iron band round the topmast or lower mast." -Whitney, 1911

Futtock Shrouds

"Iron rods leading from the futtock-plates to an iron band round the topmast or lower mast." -Whitney,…

"Gaff. B, boom; CC, cheeks; G, gaff; M, mast; P, peak; T, throat or jaw. Nautical, a spar used to extend the upper edge of fore-and-aft sails which are not set on stays, as the mainsail of a sloop or spanker of a ship." -Whitney, 1911

Gaff Rig

"Gaff. B, boom; CC, cheeks; G, gaff; M, mast; P, peak; T, throat or jaw. Nautical, a spar used to extend…

"Galley." &mdash; Greenough, 1899

Galley

"Galley." — Greenough, 1899

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans, Genoese, Pisans, and Venetians.

The Venetian galley was generally three-masted, and was usually around 160 feet long, 32 feet broad, and supplied with sixty-four oars, to each of which were chained six or seven slaves. Such galleys were equipped with powerful rams used for boarding and sinking enemy ships. Criminals in France and elsewhere were frequently condemned to serve at the oars in these craft. In modern speech, the term "galley" refers the common kitchen of a ship.

Galley (ship)

A Galley is a low, flat-built vessel furnished with one deck.It was primarily employed by the Romans,…

"Nautical, on men-of-war, a pair of strong frames of oak made in the form of a gallows, fixed between the fore and main hatchways, with concave cross-beams called gallows-tops tenoned on to the uprights, to support spare topmasts, yards, booms, boats, etc." -Whitney, 1911

Gallows-Bitts

"Nautical, on men-of-war, a pair of strong frames of oak made in the form of a gallows, fixed between…

"Garland lashed on a lower mast. A large rope strap or grommet lashed to a spar when hoisting it on board." -Whitney, 1911

Nautical Garland

"Garland lashed on a lower mast. A large rope strap or grommet lashed to a spar when hoisting it on…

A gimbals is a contrivance designed to keep a marine compass, chronometer, lamp, or other instrument in the horizontal position on board ship, notwithstanding the rolling and pitching of the vessel. The instrument is suspended in the diametral axis of a ring, which is again suspended in the diametral axis of another ring, the two axes being at right angles to one another.

Gimbals

A gimbals is a contrivance designed to keep a marine compass, chronometer, lamp, or other instrument…