The Miscellaneous Civil War ClipArt gallery includes 167 illustrations of general topic from the American Civil War, fought between the North (Union) and the South (Confederacy).

"Federal cavalry covering the escape of Federal prisoners from Libby Prison, Richmond, Va. The feeling of sympathy for the unfortunate Federal officers and men who so long suffered outrage at the hands of the Confederates gave way to a momentary feeling of joy as news came of the escape, at one time, of one hundred and nine officers and men. From time to time a few had escaped, and the narrative of their escapes had been among the most intensely exciting incidents of the war. But when more than a hundred contrived to get out of the Southern dungeon the interest knew no bounds. The method employed was as follows: Having managed to find access to the cellar, they commenced work, relieving one another as opportunity offered. Their instruments were case knives, pocket knives, chisels and files. After getting through the wall they disposed of the excavated soil by drawing it out in a spittoon, which they attached to a cord. This would be filled by the party at work in the tunnel, and pulled out into the cellar by their companions, who disposed of it by spreading it in shallow layers over the floor, concealing it beneath the straw. The tunnel, completed by fifty-one days of patient toil, was about sixty feet long, and opened into an old tobacco shed beyond the line of guards. In order to elude their pursuers, who they knew would soon be on their track, they scattered as much as possible. Many were their hardships and sufferings, and frequent were their narrow escapes from the Confederate cavalry, who the next morning were bushwhacking in every direction for them. The joy which Colonel Streight and four comrades, the pioneers of the band, experienced when they first caught sight of the Federals, sent out to help them and protect them from their pursuers, cannot be expressed."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federal Prisoners

"Federal cavalry covering the escape of Federal prisoners from Libby Prison, Richmond, Va. The feeling…

"First and last review of the First Regiment, South Carolina [African American] Volunteers, on Hilton Head, S. C., under Colonel Fessenden, U. S. A., June 25th, 1862. Our correspondent at Hilton Head wrote us: "I witnessed the parade entire, as well as the company drills in the manual of arms, etc., afterward, and I must acknowledge my complete surprise at the discipline and even vim evinced by the sable crowd. Dressed in the regulation uniform of the United States Army, tall and strong men generally speaking, they, considering that the regiment had not been fully armed but about ten days, spoke well for officers and men."" — Frank Leslie, 1896

First Regiment

"First and last review of the First Regiment, South Carolina [African American] Volunteers, on Hilton…

"Scene on the floating battery, Charleston Harbor, during the bombardment of Fort Sumter. A very important factor in the bombardment of Fort Sumter was an immense floating battery, which did effective work in the silencing of the fort's guns. Major Anderson directed many of his shots at the floating battery; but while it was struck fifteen or eighteen times, not the slightest impression was made upon its iron-cased sides."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Floating Battery

"Scene on the floating battery, Charleston Harbor, during the bombardment of Fort Sumter. A very important…

"Return of a foraging party of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, with their spoils, to Baton Rouge, having captured horses, carts, wagons, mules, contrabands, provisions, etc. On January 29th, 1863, General Grover, who commanded at Baton Rouge, having received intelligence that a large quantity of supplies had been gathered at a place some miles away, sent a foraging party, consisting of the Twenty-fourth Connecticut Regiment, to capture them. This was happily accomplished without losing a man, the Confederate guard flying at the first sight of the Federal party. The spoils were several horses, carts, wagons, mules, corn and potatoes, saying nothing of a few 'contrabands' who came to enjoy 'Massa Linkum's' proclomation."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Foraging spoils

"Return of a foraging party of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, with their spoils,…

"Return of a foraging party of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, with their spoils, to Baton Rouge, having captured horses, carts, wagons, mules, contrabands, provisions, etc. On January 29th, 1863, General Grover, who commanded at Baton Rouge, having received intelligence that a large quantity of supplies had been gathered at a place some miles away, sent a foraging party, consisting of the Twenty-fourth Connecticut Regiment, to capture them. This was happily accomplished without losing a man, the Confederate guard flying at the first sight of the Federal party. The spoils were several horses, carts, wagons, mules, corn and potatoes, saying nothing of a few 'contrabands' who came to enjoy 'Massa Linkum's' proclomation."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Foraging Spoils

"Return of a foraging party of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, with their spoils,…

"Return of a foraging party of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, with their spoils, to Baton Rouge, having captured horses, carts, wagons, mules, contrabands, provisions, etc. On January 29th, 1863, General Grover, who commanded at Baton Rouge, having received intelligence that a large quantity of supplies had been gathered at a place some miles away, sent a foraging party, consisting of the Twenty-fourth Connecticut Regiment, to capture them. This was happily accomplished without losing a man, the Confederate guard flying at the first sight of the Federal party. The spoils were several horses, carts, wagons, mules, corn and potatoes, saying nothing of a few 'contrabands' who came to enjoy 'Massa Linkum's' proclomation."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Foraging Spoils

"Return of a foraging party of the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers, with their spoils,…

"A street in Fredericksburg, Va., showing the result of the bombardment- federal soldiers grouped about. Our correspondent wrote: 'Considering the terrible nature of the bombardment, it is wonderful that not a single inhabitant was killed by it, although many families refused to avail themselves of the opportunity to leave before the firing commenced. These found shelter in the cellars of the houses, and thus escaped. The rest of the building, in many cases, was so shattered as to be perfectly uninhabitable. A fine old mansion in Main Street presented a melancholy spectacle, no less than thirty round shot having gone right through it, leaving the appearance of so many portholes. In the street the Federals bivouacked the night before the battle and the night after.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Street in Fredericksburg

"A street in Fredericksburg, Va., showing the result of the bombardment- federal soldiers grouped about.…

Group of people leaving a rural area.

Fugitives Before the Approach of a Hostile Army

Group of people leaving a rural area.

"A reconnoitring detachment of General Banks's cavalry, Hyattstown, Md., in the distance. There are few sights more picturesque than a detachment of cavalry winding along the road to some quiet little village. Nature and man seem then so little in harmony that the contradiction becomes strikingly attractive. Our illustration represents a scene of this kind- a detachment of Federal cavalry, sent by order of General Banks, reconnoitring in the neighborhood of Hyattstown, a post village of Montgomery County, Md., and situated on Bennett's Creek, about thirty-six miles to the northwest of Washington." —Leslie, 1896

Cavalry of General Banks

"A reconnoitring detachment of General Banks's cavalry, Hyattstown, Md., in the distance. There are…

"Emmittsburg, Md., Gen. Meade's Army pursuing Gen. Lee."— Frank Leslie, 1896

General Meade's Army

"Emmittsburg, Md., Gen. Meade's Army pursuing Gen. Lee."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Confederate ironclad ram <em>Georgia</em> lying off Fort Jackson, Savannah River, Ga., December 1862."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Georgia

"Confederate ironclad ram Georgia lying off Fort Jackson, Savannah River, Ga., December 1862."—…

The gold box presented to Major Robert Anderson for his command of Fort Sumter during the American Civil War.

Gold Box Presented to Anderson

The gold box presented to Major Robert Anderson for his command of Fort Sumter during the American Civil…

"Rush's lancers guarding the roads, the day after the Battle of Antietam, to prevent the passage of civilians."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Guarding Lancers

"Rush's lancers guarding the roads, the day after the Battle of Antietam, to prevent the passage of…

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan before Yorktown, April 26th, 1862. On the morning of Saturday, April 26th, 1862, Company H of the first Massachusetts Volunteers, led by Camptain Carruth, made a most brilliant charge on a Confederate redoubt, and took it at the point of the bayonet. It was defended by a company of the First Virginia Regiment, who fought with that Old Dominion valor which, to use a phrase probably heard before, "was worthy of a better cause." The Federals were exposed to a most galling fire from the instant they left the shelter of the woods until they reached the brink of the deep ditch fronting the parapet." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Company H

"Successful charge of Company H, first Massachusetts regiment (Captain Carruth), on a Confederate redan…

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Hand with Gun

"Picture of a hand with a gun at the Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the…

"Hanging and flogging."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

hanging and flogging

"Hanging and flogging."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Harrison's Landing at Berkeley Plantation is one of the first great estates in America located on the banks of the James River on State Route 5 in Charles City County, Virginia. During the Civil War, Union troops occupied Berkeley Plantation at Harrison's Landing.

Harrison's Landing

Harrison's Landing at Berkeley Plantation is one of the first great estates in America located on the…

"Hanging of Mrs. Hillier by men in disguise."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Mrs. Hillier

"Hanging of Mrs. Hillier by men in disguise."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

Horses and Wagons

Horses and wagons at the Battle of Willis Church.

"Howlett's Confederate Battery on the James River, Va., shelling the Federal monitors and laborers on the Dutch Gap Canal. Our sketch, derived from a Confederate source, represents the battery which annoyed the Federal gunboats on the James River and retarded the labor on the Dutch Gap Canal. This Confederate work was situated on the upper side of the James, in almost a northerly direction from Dutch Gap. The illustration representing it is very spirited, and will enable our readers to comprehend at a glance both the character of the enterprise and the peril under which it was prosecuted. Our sketch represents the gunners at work. In the distance are seen the obstructions which defended the river at the end of Farrar's Island. Dutch Gap, which is more to the left, does not appear in the picture. Its position is, however, sufficiently indicated by the direction of the guns and shells."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Howlett's Battery

"Howlett's Confederate Battery on the James River, Va., shelling the Federal monitors and laborers on…

"Humphrey's Division 3rd Corps."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Humphrey's Division

"Humphrey's Division 3rd Corps."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Federal soldiers participating in a hurdle sack race. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Hurdle Sack Race

"Federal soldiers participating in a hurdle sack race. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga.,…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." —Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." —Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command in the West in 1861, while he shrank from employing the Indians as soldiers, saw the advantage of using them as scouts, and for this purpose organized a band of them, selecting only the most reliable, robust and best characterized. They soon made their value known by the early intelligence they brought of the enemy's movements. Some of them were also employed by General Grant." —Leslie, 1896

Delaware Indians

"Delaware Indians acting as scouts for the Federal army in the West. General Fremont, on taking command…

"Infernal machine designed by the Confederates to destroy the Federal Flotilla in the Potomac discovered by Captain budd of the steamer "Resolute." An infernal machine designed by the Confederates to blow up the "Pawnee" and the vessels of the Potomac flotilla, which was set adrift near Aquia Creek, was picked up on the 7th of July, 1861, floating toward the "Pawnee." The following description of the article was sent to the Navy Department: "Two large eighty-gallon oil casks, perfectly watertight, acting as buoys, connected by twenty-five fathoms of three-and-a-half-inch-rope, buoyed with large squares of cork, every two feet secured to casks by iron handles. A heavy bomb of boiler iron, fitted with a brass tap and filled with powder, was suspended to the casks six feet under water. On top of the cask was a wooden box, with fuse in a gutta-percha tube. In the centre of the cork was a platform with a great length of fuse coiled away, occupying the middle of the cask." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Infernal machine

"Infernal machine designed by the Confederates to destroy the Federal Flotilla in the Potomac discovered…

Bombardment and capture of Island Number 10 was an engagement at the New Madrid or Kentucky Bend on the Mississippi River during the Civil War lasting from February 28 to April 8, 1862.

Battle of Island Number Ten

Bombardment and capture of Island Number 10 was an engagement at the New Madrid or Kentucky Bend on…

"The campaign in Kentucky, Federal troops under General Johnston, advancing on the Louisville and Nashville Turnpike, overtaken by the equipage and baggage train on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Campaign in Kentucky

"The campaign in Kentucky, Federal troops under General Johnston, advancing on the Louisville and Nashville…

Wrote many poems during the Civil War. Some of her published works include <em>Wild Roses of Cape Ann</em> and <em>Childhood Songs.</em>

Lucy Larcom

Wrote many poems during the Civil War. Some of her published works include Wild Roses of Cape Ann

The chair in which General Lee sat when signing the surrender.

General Lee's Chair

The chair in which General Lee sat when signing the surrender.

The table on which General Lee signed the surrender.

General Lee's Table

The table on which General Lee signed the surrender.

"Loading a 15-inch gun in the turret of an ericsson ironclad during the attack on Fort Sumter."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

loading gun

"Loading a 15-inch gun in the turret of an ericsson ironclad during the attack on Fort Sumter."—…

"Five locomotives built at Vicksburg, Miss., by the Federal soldiers, under the superintendence of Colonel Collbaugh, of General McPherson's staff. Our special artist transmitting this sketch wrote: 'I herein inclose a sketch of five locomotives just completed here, being the result of the mechanical ingenuity displayed by the men in this department. General Grant, in one of his reports during the siege, remarked that there was no department of mechanical labor required to be performed but that men were always on hand well skilled in the business. The completion of these fine specimens of workmanship affords ample proof of the truth of his remark. On entering the city, last July, we found the <em>debris</em> of a machine shop and some scattered fragments of locomotives. Out of these our men have created a good workshop, with all the necessary machinery for casting car wheels, etc., and the result stands forth in these engines, of which our Rogers & Baldwins might well be proud.'"&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

locomotives

"Five locomotives built at Vicksburg, Miss., by the Federal soldiers, under the superintendence of Colonel…

"The crew of the United States gunboat <em>Mahaska</em>, Captain Foxhall A. Parker destroying the water battery built by the Confederates at West Point, York River."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Mahaska Crew

"The crew of the United States gunboat Mahaska, Captain Foxhall A. Parker destroying the water…

Soldiers on the march in a storm during the Civil War.

March in the Storm

Soldiers on the march in a storm during the Civil War.

"A sketch on the battlefield- marking the corps positions."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

marking positions

"A sketch on the battlefield- marking the corps positions."— Frank Leslie, 1896

It is four o'clock in the afternoon when a messenger rides up to the house of Captain Knott V. Martin. The captain has killed a pig and is ready to dress it, when the messenger hands him a slip of paper. With knife in hand he reads it: "You are ordered to appear with your company on Boston Common at the earliest possible moment." He throws down his knife to put on the uniform. Mrs. Martin asks what he will do with the pig and Captain Martin says the pig isn't important anymore. Not an instant does he wait; the members of his company must be summoned, his knapsack packed.

Captain Knott V. Martin's Pig

It is four o'clock in the afternoon when a messenger rides up to the house of Captain Knott V. Martin.…

The Massachusetts Sixth is the first to leave to save Washington from the Confederates. However, they have trouble in Baltimore on their journey where they are attacked by the Confederates.

Massachusetts Sixth Attacked When Marching Through Baltimore

The Massachusetts Sixth is the first to leave to save Washington from the Confederates. However, they…

A council of war at Massaponax Church in Virginia.

Massaponax Church

A council of war at Massaponax Church in Virginia.

"McCandles's Brigade P.V.R.C."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

McCandles's Brigade

"McCandles's Brigade P.V.R.C."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The war in Mississippi- McPherson's troops foraging at the Confederate General Whitfield's headquarters."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

McPherson's Troops

"The war in Mississippi- McPherson's troops foraging at the Confederate General Whitfield's headquarters."—…

The First Battle of Memphis was a naval battle fought on the Mississippi River directly above the city of Memphis on June 6, 1862 during the Civil War. The battle marked the eradication of a Confederate naval presence on the Mississippi River.

First Battle of Memphis

The First Battle of Memphis was a naval battle fought on the Mississippi River directly above the city…

"The military authorities at Washington, D. C., examining passes in 1861. This scene was of frequent occurrence. A gallant volunteer wishes to take a short furlough in order to show his fiancee the wonders of the capital city. The provost marshal is scrutinizing the document with considerable interest, as though he has some latent doubts of its genuineness." &mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Military authorities

"The military authorities at Washington, D. C., examining passes in 1861. This scene was of frequent…

"Morning mustering of the 'Contrabands' at Fortress Monroe, on their way to their day's work. As a living illustration of one of the aspects of the Civil War, a sketch is given above of the contrabands, [African Americans], going to their daily work at Fortress Monroe. The variety of the Ethiopian countenance is capitally given, and while some remind us of the merry phiz of George Christy in his sable mood, others wear the ponderous gravity of a New Jersey justice. The [African American] men had a comparatively pleasant time under their state of contraband existence."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Morning Mustering

"Morning mustering of the 'Contrabands' at Fortress Monroe, on their way to their day's work. As a living…

"Heroic conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Morrison, Seventy-Ninth New York Highlanders, on the parapet of the Tower Battery, James Island, S. C." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Lieutenant Colonel Morrison

"Heroic conduct of Lieutenant Colonel Morrison, Seventy-Ninth New York Highlanders, on the parapet of…

"Interior of the Mortar Battery Stanton, Tybee Island, Ga., showing the operation of 13-inch mortars during the bombardment of Fort Pulaski, April 10th, 1862. The works erected were eleven batteries, with a parapet in front eight feet high, with a bomb-proof traverse between every two guns, the sides of the parapets and traverses being riveted with rods, fascines or hurdle works. The mortars fire over the parapets, and the guns through embrasures cut in the parapets. The batteries nearest to Fort Pulaski were connected with trenches to permit a safe communication between them. All the advanced batteries had splinter-proof shelters, and each one three reliefs, so that two of them were all the time under shelter. These advanced batteries had also a bomb-proof surgery, supplied with a table and all requisites for surgical operations, and each battery had also a well of water. In a word, the admirable manner in which these works were constructed and arranged stamped General Gilmore as one of the greatest engineers of the age Mortar Battery Stanton had three 13-inch mortars, each weighing 17,120 pounds, with a range of 3,476 yards."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Mortar Battery Stanton

"Interior of the Mortar Battery Stanton, Tybee Island, Ga., showing the operation of 13-inch mortars…

Mortar practice- putting in the shell.

Mortar practice

Mortar practice- putting in the shell.

"Mortar practice- 13-inch shell mortar, as used by the Federal government- weight of mortar 17,000 pounds." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Mortar practice

"Mortar practice- 13-inch shell mortar, as used by the Federal government- weight of mortar 17,000 pounds."…

"Mortar practice- rear view of 13-inch mortar, with its usual complement of seven gunners. The mortar is one of the most ancient forms of cannon, being used as early as 1495 by Charles VIII at the siege of Naples. In 1478 the first attempt was made to project hollow shot filled with powder; but owing to their clumsy make the accidents were so frequent as to cause their discontinuance. In 1634 a French mechanic overcame the difficulty, and mortars were revived in the French service. Our illustrations represent a 13-inch mortar, the largest in general practice, weight 17,000 pounds, exclusive of the carriage. The number of men required to work one of these guns is seven, for all of whom there is distinct and adequate occupation. Mortars are not used in hand-to-hand encounters, their value consisting in pitching shells into camps and towns, or shelling fortifications erected on elevations, against which cannons are of no avail." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Mortar practice

"Mortar practice- rear view of 13-inch mortar, with its usual complement of seven gunners. The mortar…

"The discovery of Nat Turner."&mdash;E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Nat Turner

"The discovery of Nat Turner."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

"The New Jersey troops crossing the Chesapeake Bay, in sixteen propellers, on their way to Washington, May 4th, 1861." — Frank Leslie, 1896

New Jersey troops

"The New Jersey troops crossing the Chesapeake Bay, in sixteen propellers, on their way to Washington,…

The secessionists tore up the railroad but the men of the eighth Massachusetts knew how to build railroads. Together with the New York Seventh Regiment, they began to spike down the rails and relaid the rails and made their way to Washington.

New York Seventh Regiment Marching Down Broadway

The secessionists tore up the railroad but the men of the eighth Massachusetts knew how to build railroads.…

"Night burial of Colonel Garesche, Chief of Staff to Major General Rosecrans, on the battlefield of Stone River, Tenn."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Night burial

"Night burial of Colonel Garesche, Chief of Staff to Major General Rosecrans, on the battlefield of…

The Norfolk Naval Yard, also known as the Norfolk Naval Shipyard became an integral shipyard during the Civil War. In 1861, Virginia joined the Confederate States of America. The shipyard commander feared that the Confederacy would take control of the shipyard so he ordered it to be burned. However, the Confederates still took over the shipyard without armed conflict which caused the Union forced to withdrawal to Fort Monroe.

Norfolk Navy Yard Burning

The Norfolk Naval Yard, also known as the Norfolk Naval Shipyard became an integral shipyard during…

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle grounds of New Jersey. This picture is a representation of the officers' tents of the Jersey City Zouave Company, acting as guard of honor to General Runyon." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Officer's tents

"New Jersey Camp at Arling, Va., designated as Camp Princeton in honor of one of the Revolutionary battle…

"The old stone fence."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Old Stone Fence

"The old stone fence."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Ornaments made of blue silk ribbon with a button in the center bearing the image of a palmetto tree. They were worn by ladies of Charleston immediately after the passage of the ordinance of succession.

Palmetto Cockade

Ornaments made of blue silk ribbon with a button in the center bearing the image of a palmetto tree.…

The pen with which President Abraham Lincoln wrote the Emancipation Proclamation.

President Lincoln's Pen

The pen with which President Abraham Lincoln wrote the Emancipation Proclamation.

Battle of Fort Pillow is also known as the Fort Pillow Massacre, fought on April 12, 1864 on the Mississippi River in Henning Tennessee, during the Civil War.

Battle of Fort Pillow

Battle of Fort Pillow is also known as the Fort Pillow Massacre, fought on April 12, 1864 on the Mississippi…