The Miscellaneous Civil War ClipArt gallery includes 167 illustrations of general topic from the American Civil War, fought between the North (Union) and the South (Confederacy).

Pittsburg Landing is a town in Hardin County, Tennessee and is named for the industrial heritage of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Much of the Battle of Shiloh was fought at Pittsburg Landing during the Civil War.

Pittsburg Landing in Tennessee

Pittsburg Landing is a town in Hardin County, Tennessee and is named for the industrial heritage of…

"The Plantation Police, or Patrol, was an institution peculiar to the Slave States. It was a semi-military organization, raised and supported by the planters, but recognized by the old State authorities. Their principal duty was to visit the various plantations and patrol the roads at night, arresting all [African Americans] and others not having proper passes. The war, the President's proclomation, and the actual possession of most of the State of Louisiana by the Federal authorities, rendered these patrols doubly rigorous. Some of the [African Americans] submitted reluctantly. The [African American] in the foreground is a speciman of this class. He seems to yield to the superior force of a tottering power, satisfied that his day is at hand; others show the obsequious, submissive stamp- the [African American] satisfied with his lot if he is clothed and fed."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Plantation Police

"The Plantation Police, or Patrol, was an institution peculiar to the Slave States. It was a semi-military…

Men in the Civil War building a pontoon bridge across a river.

Pontoon Bridge

Men in the Civil War building a pontoon bridge across a river.

"The advance of Port Hudson. The baggage train of General Augur's division crossing the Bayou Montecino, March 13th, 1863. Our sketch represents a baggage train belonging to General Augur's division crossing a little creek, or bayou, about four miles from Baton Rouge. It will be remembered that General Banks made a feigned advance against Port Hudson on March 13th, in order to facilitate Commodore Farragut's movements past the batteries."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Port Hudson

"The advance of Port Hudson. The baggage train of General Augur's division crossing the Bayou Montecino,…

Prisoners eluding capture.

Prison and Escape

Prisoners eluding capture.

The reward poster ordered by te Secretary of War after President Lincoln's assassination.

Reward Poster

The reward poster ordered by te Secretary of War after President Lincoln's assassination.

"Statue of Major General John f. Reynolds."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Reynolds Statue

"Statue of Major General John f. Reynolds."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Rhode Island Regiments embarking at Providence for New York and Washington. Within five days after the President's call for troops the Rhode Island Marine Artillery, with 8 guns and 110 horses, commanded by Colonel Tompkins, passed through New York on their way to Washington, and the First Regiment of infantry, 1,200 strong, under Colonel Ambrose E. Burnside, was ready to move. It was composed of many of the wealthier citizens of the State, and accompanied by the patriotic Governor, who had, from his private purse, armed and equipped the regiment, as well as contributed to the general war fun. The little State, on May 18th, 1861, appropriated $500,000 for equipping volunteers."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Rhode Island Regiments

"Rhode Island Regiments embarking at Providence for New York and Washington. Within five days after…

"Siege of Vicksburg- sharpshooters in the rifle pits constructed by Captain Hickenlooper."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Rifle Pits

"Siege of Vicksburg- sharpshooters in the rifle pits constructed by Captain Hickenlooper."— Frank…

The Robinson House belonged to a free African American during the First Battle of Bull Run. The house was captured and the battle was fought near the famous house.

Robinson's House in Battle of Bull Run

The Robinson House belonged to a free African American during the First Battle of Bull Run. The house…

"Practicing with the celebrated Sawyer gun on the Confederate batteries at Swell's Point, near Norfolk, Va., from Fort Calhoun, on the Ripraps, infront of Fortress Monroe. The Ripraps, on w hich Fort Calhoun was erected, was in advance of Fortress Monroe, being between it and Sewell's Point, and was an important position, as with guns of a proper calibre it could completely command and destroy the enemy's battery at Sewell's Point. General Butler gave special attention to this point, and various kinds of ordinances were experimented with, the Sawyer rifled cannon and the Hotchkiss shell having been proved the most complete and effective." —Leslie, 1896

Sawyer gun

"Practicing with the celebrated Sawyer gun on the Confederate batteries at Swell's Point, near Norfolk,…

Scouting party of the ninth Indian volunteers, or, as they were called, "The tigers of the bloody ninth."

Scouting Party

Scouting party of the ninth Indian volunteers, or, as they were called, "The tigers of the bloody ninth."

Sergeant Champe escaping by horseback and swimming.

Sergeant Champe

Sergeant Champe escaping by horseback and swimming.

"Taking away the colors of the Seventy-ninth New York Regiment for insubordination and mutiny, Washington, D. C., August 14th, 1861. The scene during the reading of the order of General McClellan was exceedingly impressive. The sun was just going down, and in hazy mountain twilight the features and forms of officers and men could scarcely be distinguished. Immediately behind his aid was General Porter, firm and self-possessed. Colonel Stevens was in front of the regiment, endeavoring to quiet his rather nervous horse. In the rear of the regulars, and a little distance apart, General Sickles sat carelessly on horseback, cooly smoking a cigar and conversing with some friends. At one time during the reading a murmur passed through the lines of the mutineers; and when the portion of the order directing the regiment to surrentder its colors was read a private in one of the rear lines cried out, in broad Scotch tones, "Let's keep the colors, boys!" No response was made by the remainder of the regiment. Major Sykes at once rode up the line to where the voice was heard. It would have been more than the soldier's life was worth had he been discovered at the moment in pistol range by any of the officers." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Seventy-ninth Regiment

"Taking away the colors of the Seventy-ninth New York Regiment for insubordination and mutiny, Washington,…

"Dead sharpshooters on Little Round Top."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Sharpshooters

"Dead sharpshooters on Little Round Top."— Frank Leslie, 1896

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65). He is pictured here with his generals.

Sherman and His Generals

William Tecumseh Sherman served as a General in the Union Army during the American Civil War (1861–65).…

The Shiloh Church is an important landmark during the Civil War during the Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing fought on April 6 and April 7, 1862.

Shiloh Church at Battle of Shiloh

The Shiloh Church is an important landmark during the Civil War during the Battle of Shiloh, also known…

"Federal soldiers shooting cattle for the supply of the army."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Shooting Cattle

"Federal soldiers shooting cattle for the supply of the army."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Federal signal station on Loudoun Heights, Harper's Ferry, communicating with the station on Maryland Heights."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Signal Station

"Federal signal station on Loudoun Heights, Harper's Ferry, communicating with the station on Maryland…

"Signaling with a piece of looking glass. Hints to Soldiers in the camp and on campaign."— Frank Leslie, 1896

signal with glass

"Signaling with a piece of looking glass. Hints to Soldiers in the camp and on campaign."— Frank…

Thousands of patriotic citizens filled every available space in the big railroad station in Jersey City when the Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts entered, on its way to defend the Capital, Washington, April 18th. 1861, after marching through the streets of New York. The regiment was composed of eight hundred men. This was the regiment which, upon arrival in Baltimore, was stoned and shot at by a mob of Southern men who attempted to stop its progress to Washington.

The Sixth regiment

Thousands of patriotic citizens filled every available space in the big railroad station in Jersey City…

An illustration of a group of slaves fleeing from Army.

Slaves Fleeing from Army

An illustration of a group of slaves fleeing from Army.

"The soldier's rest- the friends of the Seventh and Eighth Regiments, New York Volunteers, welcoming the return of their heroes to New York, Tuesday, April 28th, 1863."— Frank Leslie, 1896

soldiers resting

"The soldier's rest- the friends of the Seventh and Eighth Regiments, New York Volunteers, welcoming…

"A southern caricature- 'Generals Wheeler and Wharton falling slowly back, contesting every foot of the way.'"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Southern Caricature

"A southern caricature- 'Generals Wheeler and Wharton falling slowly back, contesting every foot of…

"Going into camp at Stafford's store, Va. Third Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Corps, carrying off rails and gathering persimmons. Stafford's store is on the road from New Baltimore to Falmouth, and had attached to it a meadow of about an acre, entirely surrounded with a rail fence, which was somewhat unusual in Virginia. When the Third Brigade of the Third Division and Six Army Corps approached it they found that they had come upon a place where the supplies were more abundant than in other districts; there were heard the cackling of hens, the crowing of roosters, the bleating of sheep, and all those pleasant sounds so suggestive of a good larder. Our artist significantly added that those sounds would be heard no more, plainly intimating that our hungry soldiers made their originators go the way of all flesh. It was a curious sight to see the Federal soldiers each pull up a rail and shoulder it. Before long, therefore, the fence had disappeared, leaving the field without the palisades."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Stafford's store

"Going into camp at Stafford's store, Va. Third Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Corps, carrying off rails…

"Landing state prisoners at Fort Lafayette, New York harbor, in 1861. Fort Lafayette, New York harbor, by the state prison of the republic during the Civil War, is built upn a shoal abut four hundred yards from Long Island, and is entirely surrounded by water. In shape it is quadrangular, with the angles pointing to the sea and shore diamondwise; hence it was formerly called Fort Diamond." —Leslie, 1896

State prisoners

"Landing state prisoners at Fort Lafayette, New York harbor, in 1861. Fort Lafayette, New York harbor,…

An illustration of soldiers on a Civil War hospital steamer.

Hospital Steamer

An illustration of soldiers on a Civil War hospital steamer.

"Erecting stockades at Newport News, Va., by the Federal Troops, June 1861."— Frank Leslie, 1896

stockades

"Erecting stockades at Newport News, Va., by the Federal Troops, June 1861."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"The stocks"— Frank Leslie, 1896

The Stocks

"The stocks"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Scene in the afternoon at the Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro was fought from December 31, 1862 to January 2, 1863 in Tennessee in what is known as the Stones River Campaign in the Civil War.

Battle of Stones River Scene

Scene in the afternoon at the Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro…

The Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro was fought from December 31, 1862 to January 2, 1863 in Tennessee in what is known as the Stones River Campaign in the Civil War.

Battle of Stones River

The Battle of Stones River, also known as the Second Battle of Murfreesboro was fought from December…

"Soldiers and women participating in a Thanksgiving Ball. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Thanksgiving Ball

"Soldiers and women participating in a Thanksgiving Ball. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski,…

"Thanksgiving dinner. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Thanksgiving Dinner

"Thanksgiving dinner. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862.…

A Union soldier

Union

A Union soldier

"Unite or Die." This snake device first appeared when the Stamp Act excitement was at its height.

A Union Device

"Unite or Die." This snake device first appeared when the Stamp Act excitement was at its height.

"Bringing in Union men."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Union Men

"Bringing in Union men."— Frank Leslie, 1896

"Hanging of thirty Union men."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Hanging of Union men

"Hanging of thirty Union men."— Frank Leslie, 1896

This sketch depicts Americans exchanging rages for U.S. Army clothing or uniforms to fight for the Union Army during the Battle of Fredericksburg.

Union Uniforms

This sketch depicts Americans exchanging rages for U.S. Army clothing or uniforms to fight for the Union…

"Encampment of the First Vermont Regiment, Colonel Phelps, at Newport News, Va."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Vermont Regiment

"Encampment of the First Vermont Regiment, Colonel Phelps, at Newport News, Va."— Frank Leslie,…

"Scene in camp life- company mess of the Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers in their camp before Corinth, Miss." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers

"Scene in camp life- company mess of the Thirteenth Illinois Volunteers in their camp before Corinth,…

Watts' House was an important house during the Battle of Gaines' Mill, also known as the First Battle of Cold Harbor or the Battle of Chickahominy River took place on June 27, 1862.

Watts' House at Battle of Gaines' Mill

Watts' House was an important house during the Battle of Gaines' Mill, also known as the First Battle…

"Soldiers aparticipating in a wheelbarrow race. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday, November 27th, 1862. While the loyal citizens of the North were eating their turkeys the Federal soldiers in the South were also celebrating their Thanksgiving. We illustrate the amusement indulged in at Fort Pulaski, Ga. The grand attraction of the day, however, was th <em>fete</em> given by the officers of the Forty-eighth Regiment, New York Volunteers, Colonel Barton, and Company G, Third Rhode Island Regiment."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Wheelbarrow Race

"Soldiers aparticipating in a wheelbarrow race. Thanksgiving festivities at Fort Pulaski, Ga., Thursday,…

"Sheridan's Campaign- an incident at the Battle of Winchester- a faithful dog watching and defending the dead body of his Confederate master."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Dog at Winchester

"Sheridan's Campaign- an incident at the Battle of Winchester- a faithful dog watching and defending…

An illustration of the USS Kearsarge and Captain Winslow.

Captain Winslow & USS Kearsarge

An illustration of the USS Kearsarge and Captain Winslow.

"Towing the wounded Federal soldiers down the bayou on a raft, on the night of January 14th, 1863, after the Battle of Bayou Teche, La. General Banks had arranged to stop the depredations which the Confederate steamer <em>J. A. Cotton</em> had been long committing along the Bayou Teche. He had advanced from Labadieville on January 11th with four gunboats, ten regiments of infantry and one of artillery, reaching Carney's Bridge, near Pattersonville, early on the 14th. Their progress here was stopped by several earthworks, under whose guns lay the <em>J. A. Cotton</em>. Early on the 15th Commander McKean Buchanan opened fire from the <em>Calhoun</em>, and was joined in it by the other gunboats, while the troops were advancing on shore to engage the Confederate vessels and batteries from the rear. The troops were not long in subjecting their enemy to a fierce enfilading musketry and artillery fire from the woods; and such was its destructive effect that the <em>J. A. Cotton</em> had finally to retire toward an upper battery at Butte La Rose, on the Atchafalaya. Early on the following morning the <em>J. A. Cotton</em> was seen floating down the bayou in a sheet of flame, having been set afire and abandoned by the Confederates. The troops, therefore, returned to Brashcar City, the Federal wounded having been meanwhile placed on a raft and towed down the river."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Wounded Federals

"Towing the wounded Federal soldiers down the bayou on a raft, on the night of January 14th, 1863, after…

"Group of Ellsworth's Chicago Zouave Cadets. No military organization during the war was more brilliant than the Chicago Zouave Cadets, with their striking and gay uniforms; their flowing red pants; their jaunty crimson caps; their peculiar drab gaiters and leggings, and the loose blue jackets, with rows of small, sparkling buttons, and the light-blue shirt beneath. In all their evolutions the Zouaves displayed great precision."&mdash; Frank Leslie, 1896

Zouave Cadets

"Group of Ellsworth's Chicago Zouave Cadets. No military organization during the war was more brilliant…

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. This famous body of fiery and active soldiers at length got free from the trammels and confinement of their city quarters, a change which was both pleasant and beneficial to them. They were encamped on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington, D. C., and, as our sketch will show, were most comfortably situated. Colonel Ellsworth was indefatigable in drilling his regiment, and his men most willingly seconded his efforts by close attention to duty and alacrity in the performance of all the details of camp life. The Zuoaves proved to be one of the most effective regiments in the field; they rendered efficent service in building breastworks on the outskirts of Alexandria, thereby preyenting the possibility of a surprise from the enemy, and distinguished themselves at the Battle of Bull Run in their successful assault on a confederate battery at the point of the bayonet." &mdash;Leslie, 1896

Zouaves

"Encampment of Colonel Ellsworth's New York Fire Zuoaves, on the heights opposite the Navy Yard, Washington,…