The American Revolution Miscellaneous ClipArt gallery contains 92 illustrations of Continental money, the Liberty Bell, stamps of the Stamp Act, and other assorted images related to the American Revolution.

Andrew Jackson's operations during the American Revolution.

Andrew Jackson's Operations

Andrew Jackson's operations during the American Revolution.

Lord Cornwallis Surrendered Yorktown to George Washington on October 19, 1781. The terms of surrender were documented in a formal "Articles of Capitulation".

One of the Articles of Capitulation with Cornwallis's Signature

Lord Cornwallis Surrendered Yorktown to George Washington on October 19, 1781. The terms of surrender…

"Key of the Bastile. This key of the old Paris prison known as the Bastile, was sent by La Fayette to Washington after the destruction of that edifice by the infuriated populace on the 14th of July, 1789. This was the beginning of the French Revolution. The Bastille was originally a royal place, built by Charles the Fifth of France in 1369. It was afterward used as a state prison, like the Tower of London, and became the scene of dreadful sufferings and frightful crimes. When the mob gained possession of it in 1789, they took the governor and other officers to the Place de Greve, where they first cut off their hands and then their heads. With the key, La Fayette sent a plaster model of the old building. The model, somewhat defaced from long exposure in the Alexandria museum, is among the collections of the National Institute, while the key retains its ancient position at Mount Vernon. It is of wrought iron, seven inches long. La Fayette, in his letter to Washington which accompanied the key and picture, dated 'Paris, March 17th, 1789,' said, 'Give me leave, my dear general, to present you with a picture of the Bastile, just as it appeared a few days after I had ordered its demolition, with the main key of this fortress of despotism. It is a tribute which I owe as a son to my adopted father; as an aid-de-camp to my general; as a missionary liberty to its patriarch.'"—Lossing, 1851

Bastile Key

"Key of the Bastile. This key of the old Paris prison known as the Bastile, was sent by La Fayette to…

The British General and the Boston Boys.

Boston Boys

The British General and the Boston Boys.

Brant's Rock. This rock, which is about four feet high, lies in a field on the left of the road leading from Cherry Valley to the Mohawk, about a mile and a half north of the residence of Judge Campbell. It is a fossiliferous mass, composed chiefly of shells. Behind this rock the body of Lieutenant Wormwood, lifeless and the head scalped, was found by the villagers, who had heard the firing on the previous evening. Judge campbell, who accompanied us to the spot, pointed out the stump of a large tree by the road side, as the place where Lieutenant Wormwood fell.

Brant's Rock

Brant's Rock. This rock, which is about four feet high, lies in a field on the left of the road leading…

A British cannon captured at Yorktown during the Revolutionary War.

British Cannon

A British cannon captured at Yorktown during the Revolutionary War.

This is an illustration of the British searching the Colonial Americans for illegal items at the docks.

British Search

This is an illustration of the British searching the Colonial Americans for illegal items at the docks.

Cairn on the St. Lawrence. This is probably the only structure of the kind on the American continent. Cairn is a word of Celtic origin, used to denote the conical piles of stones frequently found upon the hills of Britain. These piles are supposed by some to have been erected as memorials of some local event, while others assign to them a sepulchral character. Some are supposed to be sacrificial, like the <em>carnedd</em> of the Welsh. They all have a smiliar appearance wherever found, being composed of loose stones piled in a conical form.

Cairn

Cairn on the St. Lawrence. This is probably the only structure of the kind on the American continent.…

"Then came Lord Cathcart upon a powerful horse. He was chief of the knights. Two negro slaves wearing white breeches and blue sashes, with large silver clasps around their necks, help his stirrups."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Captain Cathcart

"Then came Lord Cathcart upon a powerful horse. He was chief of the knights. Two negro slaves wearing…

The Charter Oak. This venerable relic is still virgorous, and is a "gnarled oak" indeed. It stands upon the northern slope of the Wyllys Hill, a beautiful elevation on the south side of charter Street, a few rods east of Main Street. This engraving is from a sketch which I made of the tree from Charter Street, on the 3d of October, 1848. I omitted the picket fence in front, in order to show the appearance of the whole trunk.

Charter Oak

The Charter Oak. This venerable relic is still virgorous, and is a "gnarled oak" indeed. It stands upon…

The Charter Oak at Hartford, Connecticut

The Charter Oak at Hartford, Connecticut

The Charter Oak at Hartford, Connecticut

The coach car of a rich Tory judge, Judge Chew. He had a driver and footman in gold-laced cocked hats.

The Chew Coach

The coach car of a rich Tory judge, Judge Chew. He had a driver and footman in gold-laced cocked hats.

Henry Clinton wrote a dispatch to Burgoyne and enclosed it in an elliptical silver bullet, small enough to be swallowed if necessary.

Clinton's Dispatch and Bullet

Henry Clinton wrote a dispatch to Burgoyne and enclosed it in an elliptical silver bullet, small enough…

A statue by Daniel C. French at Concord Bridge.

The Concord Minute Man

A statue by Daniel C. French at Concord Bridge.

This forty dollar promissory note was a Continental paper bill that held almost no value during the revolution.

Continental Money

This forty dollar promissory note was a Continental paper bill that held almost no value during the…

This third dollar promissory note was a Continental paper bill that held almost no value during the revolution.

Continental Money

This third dollar promissory note was a Continental paper bill that held almost no value during the…

A soldier in the Continental Army.

Continental Soldier

A soldier in the Continental Army.

Two sides of a cross-pistareen, Spanish coin with the value of sixteen cents.

Cross-Pistareen

Two sides of a cross-pistareen, Spanish coin with the value of sixteen cents.

"While Paul Revere is riding out through Medford, Ebenezer Door, mounted on an old plod-jogging horse, with his saddle-bags flopping at every step of the animal, is going out over Boston Neck."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Ebenezer Dorr

"While Paul Revere is riding out through Medford, Ebenezer Door, mounted on an old plod-jogging horse,…

"Flag-staff, Fort Washington. This flag-staff, indicating the center of the fort, is a prominent object to passengers upon the Hudson."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Flag Staff

"Flag-staff, Fort Washington. This flag-staff, indicating the center of the fort, is a prominent object…

"American Floating Battery. I am indebted to the kindness of Peter Force, Esq., of Washington city (editor of 'The American Archives'), for this drawing of one of the American floating batteries used in the siege of Boston. It is copied from an English mauscript in his possession, and is now published for the first time. I have never met with a description of those batteries, and can judge of their construction only from the drawing. They appear to have been made of strong planks, pierced, near the water-line, for cars; along the sides, higher up, for the light and musketry. A heavy gun was placed in each end, and upon the top were four swivels."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Floating Battery

"American Floating Battery. I am indebted to the kindness of Peter Force, Esq., of Washington city (editor…

Balm of Gilead at Fort Edward.

Balm of Gilead

Balm of Gilead at Fort Edward.

"It is a weary march. The soldiers are foot-sore, hungry, exhausted. Some drop from the ranks, and fall asleep in a moment upon the frozen ground. Mile after mile they drag themselves along. Little children give them bread, glad to do so much for those who have fought so bravely, and receive in return a kind 'God bless you!'"&mdash;Coffin, 1879

God Bless You

"It is a weary march. The soldiers are foot-sore, hungry, exhausted. Some drop from the ranks, and fall…

Grey nun praying during the American Revolution.

Grey Nun

Grey nun praying during the American Revolution.

A Hessian trooper during the Revolutionary War.

Hessian Trooper

A Hessian trooper during the Revolutionary War.

Isle Aux Noix, in the Sorel. The sketch was made from the pilot's room of the steam-boat, about half a mile above the island, looking east-northeast. The landing is a little beyond the trees on the right, where sentinels are stationed. The island is small, and wholly occupied by the military works. A broad fen extends some distance from the northern side, and the wild ducks that gather there afford fine amusement for sportsment during the hunting season.

Isle Aux Noix

Isle Aux Noix, in the Sorel. The sketch was made from the pilot's room of the steam-boat, about half…

Jane McCrea Tree, Fort Edward.

Jane McCrea Tree

Jane McCrea Tree, Fort Edward.

An American soldier who recovered the South Carolina flag and temporarily restored it during a battle in 1776.

Sergeant Jasper

An American soldier who recovered the South Carolina flag and temporarily restored it during a battle…

One of the prisons used by the British at New York during the American Revolutionary War.

The Jersey Prison Ship

One of the prisons used by the British at New York during the American Revolutionary War.

An old sign for King's Ferry on the Hudson River.

King's Ferry - Old Sign

An old sign for King's Ferry on the Hudson River.

General Lafayette at the Hermitage, the home of Andrew Jackson.

Lafayette at the Hermitage

General Lafayette at the Hermitage, the home of Andrew Jackson.

The home of General Charles Lee of the American Revolution.

Charles Lee's House

The home of General Charles Lee of the American Revolution.

"Liberty Bell."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Liberty Bell

"Liberty Bell."—Lossing, 1851

Liberty Bell, from Independence Hall.

Liberty Bell

Liberty Bell, from Independence Hall.

The Liberty Bell was used to ring in the independence of the United States of America.

Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell was used to ring in the independence of the United States of America.

"Liberty Tree. I am indebted to the Hon. David Sears, of Boston, for this sketch of the 'Liberty Tree,' as it appeared just previous to its destruction by the British troops and Tories, during the siege of Boston in August, 1775. Mr. Sears has erected a row of fine buildings upon the site of the old grove of elms, of which this tree was one; and within a niche, on the front of one of them, and exactly over the spot where the <em>Liberty Tree</em> stood, he has placed a sculptured representation of it, as seen in the picture. From the time of the Stamp Act excitement until the armed possession of Boston by General Gage and his troops in 1774, that tree had been the rallying-place for the patriots, and had fallen, in consequence, much in disfavor with the friends of government. It was inscribed 'Liberty Tree,' and the ground under it was called 'Liberty Hall.' The Essex Gazette of August 31st, 1775, in describing the destruction of the tree, says, 'They made a furious attack upon it. After a long spell of laughing and grinning, sweating, swearing, and foaming with malice diabolical, they cut down the tree because it bore the name of liberty. A soldier was killed by falling from one of its branches during the operation.'"&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Liberty Tree

"Liberty Tree. I am indebted to the Hon. David Sears, of Boston, for this sketch of the 'Liberty Tree,'…

Statue of a minute man in Concord.

Minute Man Statue

Statue of a minute man in Concord.

A minuteman during the Revolution

Minuteman

A minuteman during the Revolution

A minuteman with his wife and son looks into the distance as he prepares to fight within a minute's notice.

Minuteman Ready to Fight

A minuteman with his wife and son looks into the distance as he prepares to fight within a minute's…

"Mischianza Ticket."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Mischianza Ticket

"Mischianza Ticket."—Lossing, 1851

This six dollar bill is an example of Continental paper money of the United colonies issued in 1776.

Continental Paper Money

This six dollar bill is an example of Continental paper money of the United colonies issued in 1776.

The Battle of Monmouth was an American Revolutionary War battle fought on June 28, 1778 in New Jersey.

Relics of the Battle of Monmouth

The Battle of Monmouth was an American Revolutionary War battle fought on June 28, 1778 in New Jersey.

"About forty miles northwest of Charleston, near the line between Charleston and Orangeburg counties, are some wonderful springs. The water boils up from the ground, clear and pure. It is a subterranean river that appears upon the surface, and that winds through the lowlands northwest for about two miles, and empties into the Santee at Nelson's Ferry."&mdash;Coffin, 1879

Nelson's Ferry

"About forty miles northwest of Charleston, near the line between Charleston and Orangeburg counties,…

A view of New York in 1776.

New York in 1776

A view of New York in 1776.

The Great Fire was a devastating fire that burned through the night of September 21 &ndash; September 22, 1776 on the west side of what then constituted New York City at the southern end of the island of Manhattan.

The Great Fire of New York in 1776

The Great Fire was a devastating fire that burned through the night of September 21 – September…

With the Newburgh Addresses was privately circulated a notification of a meeting of officers at a large building called "the Temple."

"The Temple," Newburg

With the Newburgh Addresses was privately circulated a notification of a meeting of officers at a large…

The officers were blindfolded and sent to Colonel Gansevoort's quarters.

Officers Blindfolded

The officers were blindfolded and sent to Colonel Gansevoort's quarters.

Palace Gate, outside. This is one of the most beautiful gates of the city, and opens toward the St. Charles, on the northern side of the town. A strong guard-house is seen at the left, pierced for muskets to defend the entrance. Immediately adjoining this gate are the artillery barracks. The gate is at the northern extremity of Palace Street, one of the broadest in the city, and "so named," says Hawkins, "from the circumstances that it led out to the Intendant's house, or palace, which stood on the beach of the St. Charles, where the queen's wool-yard now is."

Palace Gate

Palace Gate, outside. This is one of the most beautiful gates of the city, and opens toward the St.…

Palace Gate, inside. This sketch is a view from within Palace Street, looking out upon the open country beyond the St. Charles. The river, with a few masts, is seen just over the top of the gate. Adjoining the gate, on the right, is seen a portion of the guard-house.

Palace Gate

Palace Gate, inside. This sketch is a view from within Palace Street, looking out upon the open country…

"Willson's Historical Series- Franklin, The Philosopher"-Willson, 1859.

Philosopher

"Willson's Historical Series- Franklin, The Philosopher"-Willson, 1859.

Major John Pitcairn was one of the more reasonable officers of the British military. He was a Marine stationed in Boston, Massachussetts. He was in command of the advance part during the first shots of the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

Major Pitcairn

Major John Pitcairn was one of the more reasonable officers of the British military. He was a Marine…

"Remains of Pitt's statue."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Pitt's Statue

"Remains of Pitt's statue."—Lossing, 1851

"One day there came marching into camp a regiment from Virginia, from the beautiful valley of the Shenandoah. It was commanded by Daniel Morgan. The men wore frocks trimmed with fur, and fur caps ornamented with buck-tails. On their breasts were the words uttered by Patrick Henry in the House of Burgesses in Virginia, 'Liberty or Death!' They were armed with rifles, and had marched all the weary way from beyond the Potomac, to have a hand in driving the British out of Boston. General Washington was riding out to inspect the intrenchments, and met the brave riflemen. General Morgan saluted the commander-in-chief. 'From the right bank of the Potomac, general!'"&mdash;Coffin, 1879

From the Right Bank of the Potomac

"One day there came marching into camp a regiment from Virginia, from the beautiful valley of the Shenandoah.…

"Willson's Historical Series- Franklin, The Printer's Boy"-Willson, 1859.

Printers Boy

"Willson's Historical Series- Franklin, The Printer's Boy"-Willson, 1859.

Queen Esther's Rock. This view is near the ancient river bank, looking westward. The rock is a sort of conglomerate, a large proportion of which is quartz. Some of it is of a reddish color, which the credulous believe to be stains of blood still remaining. The rock projects only about eighteen inches off the ground, and its size is denoted by the figure standing beside it. In the distance, on the left, is seen the monument which has been erected to the memory of those who fell on the occasion. This scene includes a portion of the battle-ground. The little village of Troy also occupies a part of the field of conflict.

Queen Esther's Rock

Queen Esther's Rock. This view is near the ancient river bank, looking westward. The rock is a sort…

Two British Soldiers in full uniform ready for battle.

Bristish Soldiers of the Revolution

Two British Soldiers in full uniform ready for battle.

An American soldier fighting the English for the south in the Revolutionary War.

Revolutionary Soldier

An American soldier fighting the English for the south in the Revolutionary War.

A hall in the house of Beverly Robinson. This house was also the headquarters of Benedict Arnold.

Hall in the Beverly Robinson House

A hall in the house of Beverly Robinson. This house was also the headquarters of Benedict Arnold.

Roger's Rock. This sketch is from the lake, a little south of Cook's Point, seen just over the boat on the left. Immediately beyond is seen the smooth rock. Nearly opposite the 'slide' is Anthony's Nose, a high, rocky promontory, having the appearance of a human nose in shape when viewed from a particular point.

Roger's Rock

Roger's Rock. This sketch is from the lake, a little south of Cook's Point, seen just over the boat…

Savin's Rock. This is a view of the spot where Farth landed, in Orange, formerly West Haven. It is between three and four miles below New Haven, on the western side of the harbor entrance, and is a place of considerable resort in summer for the people of the city.

Savin's Rock

Savin's Rock. This is a view of the spot where Farth landed, in Orange, formerly West Haven. It is between…