The American Revolution Miscellaneous ClipArt gallery contains 92 illustrations of Continental money, the Liberty Bell, stamps of the Stamp Act, and other assorted images related to the American Revolution.

"School-house where Thomas Jefferson received his early education." -Gordy, 1916

Schoolhouse

"School-house where Thomas Jefferson received his early education." -Gordy, 1916

The home of General Schuyler of the American Revolution.

General Schuyler's House

The home of General Schuyler of the American Revolution.

The mill of General Schuyler, an American Revolution war general.

General Schuyler's Mill

The mill of General Schuyler, an American Revolution war general.

Armed settlers.

settlers

Armed settlers.

The mill at Sleepy Hollow, New York.

The Old Mill at Sleepy Hollow

The mill at Sleepy Hollow, New York.

"Society of the Cincinnati, member's certificate. This engraving is a fac simile of a certificate, about one fourth the size of the original, which is thirteen inches and a half in breadth, and twenty inches in length. The originals are printed on fine vellum. The plate was engraved in France by J. J. le Veau, from a drawing by Aug. le Belle. I am indebted to the late James G. Wilson, son of Ensign Wilson, named in the certificate, for the use of the orginal in making this copy. The former was engraved on copper; this is engraved on wood. The design represents American liberty as a strong man armed, bearing in one hand the Union flag, and in the other a naked sword. Beneath his feet are British flags, and a broken spear, shield, and chain. Hovering by his side is the eagle, our national emblem, from whose talons the lightning of destruction is flashing upon the British lion. Britannia, with the crown falling from her head, is hastening toward a boat to escape to a fleet, which denotes the departure of British power from our shore. Upon a cloud, on the right, is an angel blowing a trumpet, from which flutters a loose scroll."—Lossing, 1851

Society of the Cincinnati

"Society of the Cincinnati, member's certificate. This engraving is a fac simile of a certificate, about…

An English soldier blew his bugle to cheer the English against America

English Soldier

An English soldier blew his bugle to cheer the English against America

"Speaker's desk and Winslow's chair. This desk is made of ash. The semicircular front is about three feet in diameter. The chair, which belonged to Governor Winslow, is of English oak. It was made in 1614."—Lossing, 1851

Speaker's Desk and Winslow's Chair

"Speaker's desk and Winslow's chair. This desk is made of ash. The semicircular front is about three…

A stamp used for taxing the colonists.

Stamp

A stamp used for taxing the colonists.

A stamp used for taxing the colonists.

Stamp

A stamp used for taxing the colonists.

A stamp used for taxing the colonists.

Stamp

A stamp used for taxing the colonists.

"Stamp from the Stamp Act. The first direct issue of importance between the colonies and England came when Parliament undertook to lay a tax to be collected by officers appointed for the purpose. This was the Stamp Act, by which it was required that a stamp should be affixed to any deed, contract, bill of sale, will, and the like, made in America before it could be legal. These stamps were to be made in England and sent over to American to be sold by the government officers. It was intended that the money thus raised should be used for the support of the king's troops in America. The Stamp Act was passed by Parliament in March, 1765, and as soon as this was known in America, the colonies, from one end of the land to the other, were full of indignation. Parliament, they said, might make laws to regulate the commerce of the empire, and so draw revenue from America; but it had no right to lay a direct tax like this. Only the colonial governments, elected by the people, could lay such a tax."—Scudder, 1897

Stamp Act

"Stamp from the Stamp Act. The first direct issue of importance between the colonies and England came…

"Stamp from the Stamp Act. The first direct issue of importance between the colonies and England came when Parliament undertook to lay a tax to be collected by officers appointed for the purpose. This was the Stamp Act, by which it was required that a stamp should be affixed to any deed, contract, bill of sale, will, and the like, made in America before it could be legal. These stamps were to be made in England and sent over to American to be sold by the government officers. It was intended that the money thus raised should be used for the support of the king's troops in America. The Stamp Act was passed by Parliament in March, 1765, and as soon as this was known in America, the colonies, from one end of the land to the other, were full of indignation. Parliament, they said, might make laws to regulate the commerce of the empire, and so draw revenue from America; but it had no right to lay a direct tax like this. Only the colonial governments, elected by the people, could lay such a tax."—Scudder, 1897

Stamp Act

"Stamp from the Stamp Act. The first direct issue of importance between the colonies and England came…

Temperance cross.

Temperance Cross

Temperance cross.

The tories

Tories

The tories

Also referred to as loyalists. They were the American colonists who chose to remain loyal to Great Britain during the Revolutionary war.

A Tory

Also referred to as loyalists. They were the American colonists who chose to remain loyal to Great Britain…

"Reverse of a Massachusetts Treasury note. This is a fac simile of the device on the back of one of the first of the Massachusetts treasury notes or bills of credit. The literal translation of the Latin inscription is 'He seeks by the sword calm repose under the auspices of Freedom.' In othe words, to use a phrase of the present time, they were determined 'to conquer a peace.' The face of the bill has a neatly-engraved border of scroll-work; and on the left of the brace where the names of the committee are signed, is a circle with a ship within it."—Lossing, 1851

Treasury Note

"Reverse of a Massachusetts Treasury note. This is a fac simile of the device on the back of one of…

"Facsimile of signatures to Treaty of Peace."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

Treaty of Peace

"Facsimile of signatures to Treaty of Peace."—E. Benjamin Andrews, 1895

The Treaty Table. The table on which the capitulation was drawn up and signed was still in possession of a daughter of Mr. Bennet (Mrs. Myers) when I visited her in September, 1848. I shall have occasion to mention this venerable woman presently. The table is of black walnut, small, and of oval form, and was a pretty piece of furniture when new. It is preserved with much care by the family. The house of Mr. Bennet was near Forty Fort, and himself and family, with their most valuable effects, were within the stockade when it surrendered.

Treaty Table

The Treaty Table. The table on which the capitulation was drawn up and signed was still in possession…

"Seal and signature of Tryon. William Tryon was a native of Ireland, and was educated to the profession of a soldier. He was an officer in the British service. He married Miss Wake, a relative of the Earl of Hillsborough, secretary for the colonies. Thus connected, he was a favorite of government, and was appointed lieutenant governor of North Carolina, in 1765. On the death of Governor Dobbs, he succeeded him in office, and exercised its functions until called to fill the same office in New York, in 1771. The history of his administration in North Carolina is a record of extortion, folly, and crime. During his administration in New York, the Revolution broke out, and he was the last royal governor of that state, though nominally succeeded in office in 1780 by General Robertson, when he was returned to England. His property in North Carolina and in New York was confiscated."—Lossing, 1851

Tryon Seal

"Seal and signature of Tryon. William Tryon was a native of Ireland, and was educated to the profession…

An illustration of George Washington in horseback commanding the American army. He is lining up the army and getting them ready for battle.

George Washington and American Troops

An illustration of George Washington in horseback commanding the American army. He is lining up the…

"The Washington Elm. The horse seen in this sketch is one of the oldest in Cambridge, having been built about 1750. It has been in the posession of the Moore family about seventy-five years. Since I visited Cambridge I have been informed that a Mrs. Moore was still living there, who, from the window of that house, saw the ceremony of Washington taking command of the army."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Elm

"The Washington Elm. The horse seen in this sketch is one of the oldest in Cambridge, having been built…

An illustration of George Washington as Commander in Chief of the American army. He is riding a horse along with other members of the American army.

George Washington Riding with the American Army

An illustration of George Washington as Commander in Chief of the American army. He is riding a horse…

"Greenough's statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Statue

"Greenough's statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

"Statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

Washington Statue

"Statue of Washington."—Lossing, 1851

"The bier which Washington was carried to the tomb at Mount Vernon."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Bier

"The bier which Washington was carried to the tomb at Mount Vernon."—Lossing, 1851

"Washington's Camp Chest, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Camp Chest

"Washington's Camp Chest, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

Washington's Headquarters at Newburg

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

"Washington's writing case, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

Washington's Writing-Case

"Washington's writing case, Revolutionary relics."—Lossing, 1851

George Washington meeting with the charming widow of Daniel Parke Custis, Mrs. Martha Dandridge Custis. Mrs. Custis was later re-married to George Washington.

Colonel Washington and Mrs. Custis

George Washington meeting with the charming widow of Daniel Parke Custis, Mrs. Martha Dandridge Custis.…

An illustration of George Washington, Patrick Henry, and Edmund Pendleton on horses on their way to Philadelphia, as delegates to the First Continental Congress.

George Washington, Patrick Henry, and Edmund Pendleton

An illustration of George Washington, Patrick Henry, and Edmund Pendleton on horses on their way to…

A British Officer striking a young rebel.

Young Rebel

A British Officer striking a young rebel.