The Arches ClipArt gallery provides 57 illustrations of various types of arches including semicircular, lancet, multi foil, ogee, segmental, horseshoe, cusped, center, and drop arches.

"The portion of a pier or other structure that recieves the thrust of an arch or the end-weight of a truss."-Whitney, 1902

Abutment

"The portion of a pier or other structure that recieves the thrust of an arch or the end-weight of a…

"An ornament composed of two ogee curves meeting in the middle, each concave toward its outer extremity and convex toward the point at which it meets the other."-Whitney, 1902

Accolade

"An ornament composed of two ogee curves meeting in the middle, each concave toward its outer extremity…

"A small wing of a building; A pilaster or butress; The lateral face of the pier of an arch, extending from the edge of the opening."-Whitney, 1902

Alette

"A small wing of a building; A pilaster or butress; The lateral face of the pier of an arch, extending…

A series of arches supported on piers and pillars, used generally as a screen and support of a roof, or of the wall of a building.

Arcade

A series of arches supported on piers and pillars, used generally as a screen and support of a roof,…

An arcade is a series of apertures or recesses with arched ceilings or soffets. A series of arched openings round public squares, markets, courts, etc.

Arcade

An arcade is a series of apertures or recesses with arched ceilings or soffets. A series of arched openings…

An arcade is a series of apertures or recesses with arched ceilings or soffets. A series of arched openings round public squares, markets, courts, etc.

Arcade

An arcade is a series of apertures or recesses with arched ceilings or soffets. A series of arched openings…

"In street architecture a covered way or passage, either open at the side with a range of pillars, or completely covered over. The finest arcades of this description are to be found in Paris." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Arcade

"In street architecture a covered way or passage, either open at the side with a range of pillars, or…

A curved or vaulted structure.

Arch

A curved or vaulted structure.

"The blocks, which are technically known as voussoirs, should be of a wedge shape, the center or top block being the keystone A; the lower blocks B B which rest on the supporting pier are the springers, the upper surface of which is called the skewback, C C; the side blocks, as D, are termed the hauches. The lower surface or soffit of the arch is the intrados, E, and the upper surface the entrados, F. The rise of the arch is the distance from the springing to the soffit, G, the width between the springers is called the span, H, and the radius I. The triangular spaces between the arches are termed spandrils, K." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Arch

"The blocks, which are technically known as voussoirs, should be of a wedge shape, the center or top…

The elements of the arch. A. abutments; S. springers; V. voussoirs; I. imposts; In. intrados; K. keystone; P. piers; Ex. extrados.

Arch

The elements of the arch. A. abutments; S. springers; V. voussoirs; I. imposts; In. intrados; K. keystone;…

Groined arch and a flying buttress; both are common architectural elements.

Arch

Groined arch and a flying buttress; both are common architectural elements.

"Triumphal arches from a class apart among the monuments of Roman architecture. It was an early custom for victorious generals to make a triumphal entry into the city, during which were displayed the spoils of war in the shape of arms, temple vessels, jewels and more. Larger triumphal arches had a smaller passage on each side, besides the main entrance."

Arch of Constantine

"Triumphal arches from a class apart among the monuments of Roman architecture. It was an early custom…

A structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. The arch is invariably a free-standing structure, quite seperate from city gates or walls. In its simplest form a triumphal arch consists of two pillars connected by an arch, crowned with a superstructure or attic on which a statue might be mounted or which bears commemorative inscriptions. More elaborate triumphal arches have more than one archway, typically three or five of varying sizes.

Arch of Triumph

A structure in the shape of a monumental archway, usually built to celebrate a victory in war. The arch…

An illustration of the centering for a stone arch.

Centering for Stone Arch

An illustration of the centering for a stone arch.

Elipse arch.

Arch

Elipse arch.

Equilateral arch.

Arch

Equilateral arch.

Horseshoe arch.

Arch

Horseshoe arch.

Lancet arch.

Arch

Lancet arch.

Segment arch.

Arch

Segment arch.

Segmental arch.

Arch

Segmental arch.

Semicircle arch.

Arch

Semicircle arch.

An illustration of two story tall arches.

Arches

An illustration of two story tall arches.

"Arches of S. Apol linare Nuovo, Ravenna." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Arches

"Arches of S. Apol linare Nuovo, Ravenna." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Romanesque arches." —D'Anvers, 1895

Romanesque arches

"Romanesque arches." —D'Anvers, 1895

"A rear vault; an arch or a vault placed within the opening of a window or door, and differing from it in form, to increase the size of the aperture internally, to receive a charge from above, or to form an architectural junction between interior and exterior forms."-Whitney, 1902

Arriere-voussure

"A rear vault; an arch or a vault placed within the opening of a window or door, and differing from…

"Three center arches, employed in French Flamboyant." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Center Arch

"Three center arches, employed in French Flamboyant." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Four center arches, employed in the Perpendicular and Tudor periods." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Center Arch

"Four center arches, employed in the Perpendicular and Tudor periods." — The Encyclopedia Britannica,…

The capital of a pillar or pilaster which supports an arch; more commonly called impost.

Chaptrel

The capital of a pillar or pilaster which supports an arch; more commonly called impost.

The courtyard of an antique structure.

Courtyard of a House

The courtyard of an antique structure.

"Cusped arch; Christchurch Priory, Hants." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Cusped Arch

"Cusped arch; Christchurch Priory, Hants." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Cycloidal Arch. Elliptical Arch."-Whitney, 1902

Cycloidal Arch

"Cycloidal Arch. Elliptical Arch."-Whitney, 1902

In the Middle East, it is customary to take your shoes off before entering a building.

Doorway

In the Middle East, it is customary to take your shoes off before entering a building.

A passageway covered by a succession of arches supported by columns.

Doric Arcade

A passageway covered by a succession of arches supported by columns.

"Drop arches, with centers within the arch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Drop Arch

"Drop arches, with centers within the arch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Equilateral pointed arches, described from two centers, the radius being the whole width of the arch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Equilateral Arch

"Equilateral pointed arches, described from two centers, the radius being the whole width of the arch."…

"The Italian city of Volterra still preserves in the Porta dell' Arco an interesting relic of Ertuscan times. The archway, one of the original gates of the ancient town, is about twenty feet in height and twelve feet in width. On the keystone and imposts are three curious heads, probably representing the guardian deities of the place."—Webster, 1913

An Ertuscan Arch

"The Italian city of Volterra still preserves in the Porta dell' Arco an interesting relic of Ertuscan…

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra and other gates at Perugia; so also in the Cloacæ at Rome, of which the Cloaca Maxima is 20 feet broad. These are sewers which were intended to render the marshy district between the hills of Rome inhabitable. They were constructed in the reign of Tarquinius Superbus, at the beginning of the sixth century B.C.

Etruscan Arch at Perugia

In these Etruscan buildings traces are to be found of the arch; as, for instance, in the Gate of Volterra…

"Extradosed Arch. a, abutments; v, voussoirs; s, springs; i, imposts; In, intrados; p, piers; k, keystone; Ex, extrados."-Whitney, 1902

Extradosed Arch

"Extradosed Arch. a, abutments; v, voussoirs; s, springs; i, imposts; In, intrados; p, piers; k, keystone;…

"Flat arch, where the soffit is horizontal and sometimes slightly cambered (dotted line)." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Flat Arch

"Flat arch, where the soffit is horizontal and sometimes slightly cambered (dotted line)." — The…

"Pointed foiled arches, in the arcades of Beverley Minister and Netley Abbey." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Foiled Arch

"Pointed foiled arches, in the arcades of Beverley Minister and Netley Abbey." — The Encyclopedia…

"Horizontally-coursed Arch." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Horizontal Arch

"Horizontally-coursed Arch." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"Horseshoe arch, with the center above the springing; employed in Moorish architecture." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Horseshoe Arch

"Horseshoe arch, with the center above the springing; employed in Moorish architecture." — The…

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Impost, Continuous

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Impost, Discontinuous

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Impost, Shafted

Junction between an arch and the column, pier, or wall on which it rests.

Lancet or pointed arch.

Lancet Arch

Lancet or pointed arch.

"Lancet Arch., Horseshoe Arch."-Whitney, 1902

Lancet Arch

"Lancet Arch., Horseshoe Arch."-Whitney, 1902

"Lancet arches, with centers outside the arch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Lancet Arch

"Lancet arches, with centers outside the arch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Multifoil cusped arch, invented by the Moors at Cordova in the 10th century." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Multifoil Arch

"Multifoil cusped arch, invented by the Moors at Cordova in the 10th century." — The Encyclopedia…

Norman arch.

Norman Arch

Norman arch.

"Ogee Arch., Equilateral Arch."-Whitney, 1902

Ogee Arch

"Ogee Arch., Equilateral Arch."-Whitney, 1902

"Ogee arches, with curves of counter flexure, found in English Decorated and French Flamboyant." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Ogee Arch

"Ogee arches, with curves of counter flexure, found in English Decorated and French Flamboyant." —…

"Segmental Arch.; Semicircular arch."-Whitney, 1902

Segmental Arch

"Segmental Arch.; Semicircular arch."-Whitney, 1902

"Segmental arch, where the center is below the springing." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Segmental Arch

"Segmental arch, where the center is below the springing." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Semicircular arch, he center of which is in the same line with its springers." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Semicircular Arch

"Semicircular arch, he center of which is in the same line with its springers." — The Encyclopedia…

"Stilted arches, where the center is below the springing, but the sides are carried down vertically." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Stilted Arch

"Stilted arches, where the center is below the springing, but the sides are carried down vertically."…

"Stilted Arches.-Modern Romanesque."-Whitney, 1902

Stilted Arches

"Stilted Arches.-Modern Romanesque."-Whitney, 1902