This ClipArt gallery includes 44 illustrations related to the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

"Battle of Belmont, Mo., opposite Columbus, Ky, November 7th, 1861- Federal forces commanded by U. S. Grant; Confederate forces, by Leonidas Polk. Explanation: 1. Brigadier General Grant and staff directing the movements of the troops. 2. Brigadier General McClernand leading the charge at the head of the Thirty-first Illinois. 3. Thirty-first Illinois, Colonel Logan. 4. Body of Lieutenant Colonel Wendtz, Seventh Ohio. 5. Body of Captain Pulaski, aid-de-camp to McClernand, killed while leading the charge. 6. Caisson ordered to the field from the rear. 7. Twenty-seventh Illinois, Colonel Buford, taking the camp colors of the Confederates. 8. Thirtieth illinois, colonel Fouke. 8A. Twenty-second Illinois, Colonel Dougherty. 9. Light artillery, Captain Taylor. 10. Seventh Ohio, Colonel 11. Captain Schwartz, acting chief of artillery, taking the Confederate battery. 12. Watson's Louisiana field battery. 13. Confederate artillery horses. 14. Battery of heavy ordinance at Columbus. 15. Encampment near Columbus. 16. Confederate ferryboat. 17. Columbus"— Frank Leslie, 1896

Battle of Belmont

"Battle of Belmont, Mo., opposite Columbus, Ky, November 7th, 1861- Federal forces commanded by U. S.…

Boone first reached Kentucky in the fall of 1767 when on a long hunt with his brother Squire Boone, Jr.

Daniel Boone's First Sight of Kentucky

Boone first reached Kentucky in the fall of 1767 when on a long hunt with his brother Squire Boone,…

"Boone's Fort. This sketch is from a drawing by Colonel Henderson, and published in Collin's <em>Historical Collections of Kentucky</em>, page 417. It was composed of a number of long-houses disposed in the form of an oblong square. Those at each corner, intended particularly for block-houses, were larger and stronger than the others. The length of the fort was about two hundred and fifty feet, and the width about one hundred and fifty feet."—Lossing, 1851

Boone's Fort

"Boone's Fort. This sketch is from a drawing by Colonel Henderson, and published in Collin's Historical

Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail into central Kentucky and built Fort Boone, soon renamed Boonesborough.

Boone's Fort

Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Trail into central Kentucky and built Fort Boone, soon renamed Boonesborough.

General John C. Breckinridge (1821 - 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative and Senator from Kentucky, the 14th Vice President of the United States, Southern Democratic candidate for President in 1860, a Confederate general in the Civil War and the last Confederate Secretary of War.

John C. Breckinridge

General John C. Breckinridge (1821 - 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative and Senator from Kentucky,…

John Cabell Breckinridge was a lawyer, U.S. Representative, Senator from Kentucky, Vice President of the United States, Southern Democratic candidate for President in 1860, a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the last Confederate Secretary of War.

John Cabell Breckinridge

John Cabell Breckinridge was a lawyer, U.S. Representative, Senator from Kentucky, Vice President of…

(1835-1910) US representative, Speaker of the House of Representatives, senator Kentucky, and cabinet officer

John G. Carlisle

(1835-1910) US representative, Speaker of the House of Representatives, senator Kentucky, and cabinet…

Henry Clay, the famous American statesman and orator. He ran for president unsuccessfully several times. Speaker of the House of Representatives, US Secretary of State, Senator from Kentucky.

Henry Clay

Henry Clay, the famous American statesman and orator. He ran for president unsuccessfully several times.…

Known as "The Great Compromiser" and "The Great Pacifier" for his ability to bring others to agreement, he was the founder and leader of the Whig Party. Pictured here is Henry Clay at 40 years of age. Senator from Kentucky.

Henry Clay

Known as "The Great Compromiser" and "The Great Pacifier" for his ability to bring others to agreement,…

"General view of Columbus, Ky., and its fortications, looking down the river, showing the 'Iron Bluffs' crowned with batteries, the water batteries and the arrival of the Federal gunboats, March 4th, 1862. Our sketch of Columbus and its fortifications, which was called the Western Gibraltar by the Confederates, became untenable by them after the fall of Fort Henry, Donelson, Bowling Green, and especially Nashville. A glance at our illustration will show its immense strength on the river side, and it must be confessed that General Polk had not been slow to improve its natural advantages. The water batteries entirely command the river, and to silence them would have required all Commodore Foote's gallantry and skill. Our picture represents all the water batteries which are situated about a mile above the City of Columbus. The bluffs which are also crowned with cannon, are from seventy to eighty feet high."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Columbus, Kentucky

"General view of Columbus, Ky., and its fortications, looking down the river, showing the 'Iron Bluffs'…

(1793-1881) — of Kentucky. Born in 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Speaker of the Kentucky State House of Representatives, 1846-47.

Leslie Combs

(1793-1881) — of Kentucky. Born in 1793. Served in the U.S. Army during the War of 1812; Speaker of…

John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786 - July 26, 1863) was an American statesman from Kentucky. He twice served as United States Attorney General. He represented Kentucky in both houses of Congress and served as the state's seventeenth governor.

John Jordan Crittenden

John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786 - July 26, 1863) was an American statesman from Kentucky.…

"Federal Volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington on a bridge of coal boats, constructed for the occasion, on their way to defend Kentucky from the Confederates under General Kirby Smith, September 5th, 1862. The Confederate army under command of General Kirby Smith was variously estimated from 15,000 to 30,000 men. They were poorly clad, but well armed, and considering their organization were tolerably well disciplined. Their officers were bitter desperadoes, and they united in their expressed determination to pillage Cincinnati, against which city they pretended to have some terrible grudge to settle. General Kirby Smith, the Confederate commander, was much trusted by his troops, and was a cool and daring leader. Our sketch represents the Federal volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington to defend Kentucky."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Federals Crossing

"Federal Volunteers crossing from Cincinnati to Covington on a bridge of coal boats, constructed for…

The first permanent state house in Frankfort, Kentucky.

First State House, Frankfort, KY

The first permanent state house in Frankfort, Kentucky.

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal mortar boats and gunboats, March 17th, 1862. From a sketch by our special artist Mr. H. Lovie, on board the gunboat "Conestoga." On the 16th of March, 1862, the mortar fleet and the gunboats, consisting of the <em>Cincinnati, Pittsburg, St. Louis, Silver Wave, Carondelet, Mount City, Conestoga, Louisville, Rob Roy, Alps, Wilson, Lake Erie, Great Western</em> and <em>Torrence</em>, and nine mortar boats, arrived near the Point. These were accompanied by several tugboats. On the same day they opened fire, which, after some hours' delay, was returned by the Confederate batteries. This continued for several days, with very small loss to the Federal side, owing to the iron casing of the vessels engaged, and a superior range." — Frank Leslie, 1896

Bombardment of Island No. 10

"Bombardment of Island No. 10 and the fortifications opposite, on the Kentucky Shore, by the Federal…

Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 or 1781 &ndash; November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. He was the only vice-president ever elected by the United States Senate under the provisions of the Twelfth Amendment. Johnson also represented Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate and began and ended his political career in the Kentucky House of Representatives.

Richard Mentor Johnson's Monument

Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 or 1781 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President…

The official seal of the U.S. state of Kentucky in 1889.

Kentucky

The official seal of the U.S. state of Kentucky in 1889.

The United States seal of Kentucky in 1792.

Kentucky

The United States seal of Kentucky in 1792.

The state banner of Kentucky, the blue grass state.

Kentucky

The state banner of Kentucky, the blue grass state.

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal troops and the Morgan Confederate Guerrillas. Cynthiana, the scene of the fight between the Cincinnati volunteers and Morgan's Confederate cavalry, is the capital of Harrison County, Ky. When Morgan with his guerrilas arrived on the south side of the Licking River, on Thursday, July 17th, 1862, he found Lieutenant Colonel Landrum, of the Eighteenth Kentucky Regiment, with a hastily gathered force, ready to oppose him. The splendidly mounted Confederates were, however, too much for him, and after making a gallant defense the Confederates forced their way over the bridge, killed a number of the Federals and captured one cannon. Landrum and about forty of his troops made good their retreat to Lexington, which was in a perfect panic at the proximity of the Confederate chief." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- the fight at the Licking Bridge, Cynthiana, between the Federal…

"The raid in Kentucky- the Confederate Morgan with his guerillas bivouacking in Courthouse Square, Paris, Bourbon County, after levying contributions on the inhabitants. The Confederate Morgan reached Paris and Cynthiana, both of which places he occupied, levying large contributions on its unfortunate inhabitants. Our artist reported that it was a most animated and interesting sight to see the blank dismay of the 'Parisians' when Morgan and his men dismounted and bivouacked in their fine square. Beyond some robberies there were no outrages committed. The Courthouse is a very imposing building, and, standing on the highest spot in the town, is visible for miles around."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid

"The raid in Kentucky- the Confederate Morgan with his guerillas bivouacking in Courthouse Square, Paris,…

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- excitement at Convington- gathering of armed Federal citizens at the railroad and telegraph office, on hearing of the capture of Cynthiana by the Confederate Morgan. The dash of Morgan from his mountain haunts in Tennessee through Kentucky caused considerable alarm throughout the State, for it was well planned and boldly executed. It is said to have been an inspiration from Jeff Davis himself, intended to produce a general uprising in Kentucky against the Federal Government. The people, however, soon recovered from their momentary terror; and it was then seen how much stronger the Federal sentiment was in Kentucky than that of Secession." —Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Raid Rally

"The Confederate raid into Kentucky- excitement at Convington- gathering of armed Federal citizens at…

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1876

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1881

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1881

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1890

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1890

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1904

Kentucky seal

Seal of the commonwealth of Kentucky, 1904

"The Federal Army, under General Pope, landing on the Kentucky Shore, opposite New Madrid, April 1st, 1862. New Madrid was the scene of one of the most remarkable exploits in military annals- the capture of six thousand men and an immense store of arms and munitions of war on an adjacent island, which had been elaborately fortified. New Madrid is situated on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, and possessed a large business in cattle, corn and lumber for the Southern market at the commencement of the war. It is about forty miles below Columbus, and sixty miles from Cairo, and about eight miles from the far-famous Island No. 10. These distances are calculated by the winding of the river. It was first settled in 1780, and gradually grew larger till 1812, when the great earthquake nearly destroyed it."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Kentucky Shore

"The Federal Army, under General Pope, landing on the Kentucky Shore, opposite New Madrid, April 1st,…

The seal of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The seal shows a frontiersman and a statesman shaking hands with the state motto, "United we stand, divided we fall."

Seal of Kentucky

The seal of the Commonwealth of Kentucky. The seal shows a frontiersman and a statesman shaking hands…

"The campaign in Kentucky, Federal troops under General Johnston, advancing on the Louisville and Nashville Turnpike, overtaken by the equipage and baggage train on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Campaign in Kentucky

"The campaign in Kentucky, Federal troops under General Johnston, advancing on the Louisville and Nashville…

The birthplace of Abraham Lincoln in Hardin County, Kentucky.

Lincoln's Birthplace

The birthplace of Abraham Lincoln in Hardin County, Kentucky.

Lincoln's birthplace in Hardin County, Kentucky.

Lincoln's birthplace

Lincoln's birthplace in Hardin County, Kentucky.

The log cabin in Kentucky where Abraham Lincoln was born.

Lincoln's Birthplace

The log cabin in Kentucky where Abraham Lincoln was born.

The entrance to Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

Mammoth Cave

The entrance to Mammoth Cave, Kentucky.

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis in front of the fortifications near Green River. Our correspondent reports of this battle: 'At five o'clock the Confederates were seen forming in front of our rifle pits, and soon, from the cover of the woods and abatis, began the engagement by a rapid fire of musketry. It was plainly seen that a disposition of our men was being made by Colonel Wilder to repel the attack anticipated on the left, and, thinking it a favorable hour, the Confederate force made a desperate assault on our right. This was made by a Mississippi and a Georgia regiment. The assault was led by the colonel of the Mississippi regiment, and he died for his daring. The major of the same regiment was wounded and taken prisoner. The newly formed Confederate right marched from the woods in splendid order, with ranks apparently full. When they appeared over the brow of the hill it was at a double-quick; all pushed on with desperate courage, to meet resistance not the less desperate. With grape from the artillery and a shower of balls from the musketry they were met and moved down; but they never faltered; and it was only when they sprang on the breastworks and were met with the bayonet that they fell back, leaving the field strewn with their dead and dying. After a momentary struggle on the breastworks the whole Confederate force broke into disorder and fled from the field.'" —Leslie, 1896

Battle of Munfordville

"Battle of Munfordville, Ky., Sunday, September 14th, 1862- the Confederates charging through the abatis…

"View of the town of Paducah, Ky., at the confluence of the rivers Ohio and Tennessee, the Northern terminus of the Mobile and Ohio railroad. This flourishing city, the capital of McCracken County, is situated at the confluence of the Ohio and Tennessee Rivers, and is connected with Mobile by railroad. It had a fine range of warehouses fronting the river, contained five churches, two banks and two newspaper offices; it had also a marine hospital. Its position had given it many commercial advantages, which were fast operating to make it one of the most progressive cities of the West. When, however, the confederates took possession of the Columbus and Hickman, two important points in Kentucky on the Mississippi, it became necessary to hold them in check and to prevent their flanking the Federal stronghold of Cairo; and with his usual sagacity and promptitude, General Grant immediately occupied Paducah. This step, although an apparent invasion of the sacred soil of Kentucky, received the entire approval of that loyal and gallant Sate as expressed through her Legislature; and Paducah was of course retained while the necessity for its occupation existed. Paducah contained about 8,000 inhabitants, very few of whom were tainted with the secession treason. It is 47 miles east from Cairo, and 225 from Louisville. It is named after a famous Indian chief who formerly lived in its vicinity."— Frank Leslie, 1896

Paducah, Kentucky

"View of the town of Paducah, Ky., at the confluence of the rivers Ohio and Tennessee, the Northern…

A scene of Perryville, Kentucky.

Perryville

A scene of Perryville, Kentucky.

The Battle of Perryville, also known as the Battle of Chaplin Hills, was fought on October 8, 1862, in the Chaplin Hills west of Perryville, Kentucky as the culmination of the Confederate Heartland Offensive during the Civil War.

Battle of Perryville

The Battle of Perryville, also known as the Battle of Chaplin Hills, was fought on October 8, 1862,…

(1750-1826) Soldier and Public official who fought important battles during the American Revolution. He became the first governor of Kentucky.

Colonel Isaac Shelby

(1750-1826) Soldier and Public official who fought important battles during the American Revolution.…

First Governor of Kentucky

Isaac Shelby

First Governor of Kentucky

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.

Southern Republic Built From The Ruins

A political cartoon of the Southern states being built from the ruins after the Civil War.