The New York ClipArt gallery includes 205 illustrations related to the Empire State. Illustrations include the Capitol at Albany, scenic views, buildings, and famous landmarks.

The arch erected in New York City to celebrate the return of Admiral George Dewey.

Triumphal Arch in New York City

The arch erected in New York City to celebrate the return of Admiral George Dewey.

"View at Turtle Bay. Turtle Bay is a small rock-bound cove of the East River, at the foot of Forty-seventh Street. The banks are high and precipitous, and afforded a safe retreat for small vessels. Here the government had made a magazine of military stores, and these the Sons of Liberty determined to seize. Under the direction of Lamb, Sears, Willett, and McDougal, a party procured a sloop at Greenwich, came stealthily through the dangerous vortex of Hell Gate at twilight, and at midnight surprised and captured the guard, and secured the stores. The old store-house in which they were deposited is yet standing upon a wharf on the southern side of the little bay. The above view is from the bank at the foot of Forty-sixth Street. Beyond the rocky point on the north side of the bay is seen the lower end of Blackwell's Island, with the shore of Long Island in the distance. On the left of the old store-house, is seen the bridge across the mouth of Newtown Creek, a locality which will be mentioned presently in connection with a notice of the landing of troops under Sir Henry Clinton."—Lossing, 1851

Turtle Bay

"View at Turtle Bay. Turtle Bay is a small rock-bound cove of the East River, at the foot of Forty-seventh…

An illustration of the University of New York. New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, research university in New York City. NYU's main campus is situated in the Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. Founded in 1831, NYU is the largest private, nonprofit institution of higher education in the United States, with an enrollment of more than 50,000 students.

New York University

An illustration of the University of New York. New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian,…

"Van Wart's monument. The following are the inscriptions upon this monument: North Side: 'Here repose the mortal remains of Isaac Van Wart, an elder in the Greenburgh church, who died on the 23d of May, 1828, in the 69th year of his age. Having lived the life, he died the death, of the Christian. South Side: 'The citizens of the county of West Chester erected this tomb in testimony of the high sense they entertained for the virtuous and patriotic conduct of their fellow-citizen, as a memorial sacred to public graditute.' East Side: 'Vincent, Amor Patriae. Nearly half a century before this monument was built, the conscript fathers of America had, in the Senate chamber, voted that Isaac Van Wart was a faithful patriot, one in whom the love of country was invincible, and this tomb bears testimony that the record is true.' West Side: 'Fidelity. On the 23d of September, 1780, Isaac Van Wart, accompanied by John Paulding and David Williams, all farmers of the county of West Chester, intercepted Major Andre, on his return from the American lines in the character of a spy, and, notwithstanding the large bribes offered them for his release, nobly disclaimed to sacrifice their country for gold, secured and carried him to the commanding officer of the district, whereby the dangerous and traitorous conspiracy of Arnold was brought to light, the insiduous designs of the enemy, baffled, the American army saved, and our beloved country free.'"—Lossing, 1851

Van Wart's Monument

"Van Wart's monument. The following are the inscriptions upon this monument: North Side: 'Here repose…

The Vankleek House. It was built by Myndert Vankleek, one of the first settlers in Dutchess county, in 1702, and was the first substantial house erected upon the site of Poughkeepsie. Its walls were very thick, and near the eaves they were pierced with lancet loop-holes for musketry. It was here that Ann Lee, the founder of the sect called Shaking Quakers, in this country, was lodged the night previous to her commitment to the Poughkeepsie jail, in 1776. She was a native of Manchester, England. During her youth she was employed in a cotton factory, and afterward as a cook in the Manchester infirmary. She married a blacksmith named Stanley; became acquainted with James and Jane Wardley, the originators of the sect in England, and in 1758 joined the small society they had formed. In 1770 she pretended to have received a revelation, while confined in prison on account of her religious fanaticism; and so great were the spiritual gifts she was believed to possess, that she was soon acknowledged a spirtual mother in Christ. Hence her name of Mother Ann. She and her husband came to New York in 1774. He soon afterward abandoned her and her faith, and married another woman. She collected a few followers, and in 1776 took up her abode in the woods of Watervliet, near Niskayuna, in the neighborhood of Troy. By some she was charged with witchcraft; and, because she was opposed to war, she was accused of secret correspondence with the British. A charge of high reason was preferred against her, and she was imprisoned in Albany during the summer. In the fall it was concluded to send her to New York, and banish her to the British army, but circumstances prevented the accomplishment of the design, and she was imprisoned in the Poughkeepsie jail until Governor Clinton, in 1777, hearing of her situation, released her. She returned to Watervliet, and her followers greatly increased. She died there in 1784, aged eighty-four years. Her followers sincerely believe that she now occupies that form or figure which John saw in his vision, standing beside the Savior.

Vankleek House

The Vankleek House. It was built by Myndert Vankleek, one of the first settlers in Dutchess county,…

Founded as an all-female college by Matthew Vassar in 1861. It is located in Hudson Valley, New York.

Vassar College

Founded as an all-female college by Matthew Vassar in 1861. It is located in Hudson Valley, New York.

The first institution for imparting a full collegiate education to women established in the world; founded by Matthew Vassar in Poughkeepsie, NY in 1861.

Vassar College from the Lake

The first institution for imparting a full collegiate education to women established in the world; founded…

The observatory located at Vassar College, in New York.

Vassar Observatory

The observatory located at Vassar College, in New York.

Lake George, also known as <em>Queen of American Lakes</em>, is a long narrow lake at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, northern New York. The lake extends about 32.2 miles on a north-south axis and varies from 1 to 3 miles in width.

View of Lake George, N.Y.

Lake George, also known as Queen of American Lakes, is a long narrow lake at the southeast…

An illustration depicting the arrival of the Walloon settlers on Long Island.

Landing of the Walloons

An illustration depicting the arrival of the Walloon settlers on Long Island.

At Fraunces Tavern on December 4, Washington formally bade his officers farewell and on December 23, 1783, he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief, emulating the Roman general Cincinnatus, an exemplar of the republican ideal of citizen leadership who rejected power. During this period, the United States was governed under the Articles of Confederation without a President, the forerunner to the Constitution.

Washington Resigning His Commission

At Fraunces Tavern on December 4, Washington formally bade his officers farewell and on December 23,…

General Washington's farewell to his officers.

Washington's Farewell

General Washington's farewell to his officers.

The Morris-Jumel Mansion (also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House), located in historic Washington Heights, is the oldest house in Manhattan. It served as a headquarters for both sides in the American Revolution. Between September 14 and October 20, 1776, General George Washington used the mansion as his temporary headquarters after he and his army were forced to evacuate Brooklyn Heights following their loss to the British Army under the command of General William Howe in the Battle of Long Island.

Washington's Headquarters at New York

The Morris-Jumel Mansion (also known as the Roger and Mary Philipse Morris House), located in historic…

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

Washington's Headquarters at Newburg

The headquarters of George Washington at Newburg during the Revolutionary War.

The headquarters of Washington at Tappan, New York.

Washington's Headquarters at Tappan

The headquarters of Washington at Tappan, New York.

Hasbrouck House served as Washington's headquarters during the Revolutionary War from April 1782 until August 1783. It was chosen for its comparatively safe location north of the strategically important West Point. The 7,000 troops of the Continental Army were encamped near what is today known as Vails Gate, a few miles to the southwest.

Entrance to Washington's Headquarters, Newburgh

Hasbrouck House served as Washington's headquarters during the Revolutionary War from April 1782 until…

In 1788, he built a magnificent home on Broadway, which in 1790 was leased to become the president's home, occupied by George Washington after the president's previous residence on Pearl proved too small.

George Washington's House on Broadway, New York (1790)

In 1788, he built a magnificent home on Broadway, which in 1790 was leased to become the president's…

In 1789, George Washington lived on Cherry Street, in a four-story mansion that belonged to Walter Franklin, a wealthy merchant. This house served as the first Executive Mansion of the President of the United States.

George Washington's House on Cherry Street, New York (1789)

In 1789, George Washington lived on Cherry Street, in a four-story mansion that belonged to Walter Franklin,…

"View at Fort Washington. This is a view from the site of the interior works at Fort Washington from the foot of the flag-staff, loking southwest. In the foreground are seen the remains of the embankments. The tall mast seen near the river below is the support for telegraph wires which cross the Hudson there, from the rocky point of Jefrrey's Hook. In the distance across the river are the Palisades, and the mast upon their summit denotes the site of the redoubt north of Fort Lee. This little sketch exhibits the relative position of Forts Washington and Lee."&mdash;Lossing, 1851

Fort Washington

"View at Fort Washington. This is a view from the site of the interior works at Fort Washington from…

An illustration of Horse Shoe and Birmingham Falls.

Waterfall

An illustration of Horse Shoe and Birmingham Falls.

West Point under the control of the British, secured by Benedict Arnold.

West Point

West Point under the control of the British, secured by Benedict Arnold.

"West Point in 1780. This view is from a print published in the <em>New York Magazine</em> for 1790. It was taken from Constitution Island. On the left is seen a portion of old Fort Constitution. The great chain, four hundred and fifty yards in length, and covered by a strong battery, is seen stretched across the river, immediately below Fort Clinton, the structure on the high point. In the distance, on the left, two mountain summits are seen, crowned with fortifications. These were the North and Middle Redoubts. Upon the range of the Sugar Loaf Mountain, higher than these, and hidden, in the view, by Fort Clinton, was another redoubt, called the South Battery."—Lossing, 1851

West Point

"West Point in 1780. This view is from a print published in the New York Magazine for 1790.…

The Williamsburg Bridge in New York.

Williamsburg Bridge

The Williamsburg Bridge in New York.

Eleazer Derby Wood (1783 &ndash; September 17, 1814) was an American Army officer in the War of 1812. He was distinguished at Fort Erie, where he lost his life in a sortie. Colonel Wood was much beloved by General Brown, who caused a handsome marble monument to be erected to his memory at West Point. Also, he was the namesake of Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island in New York Harbor on which the Statue of Liberty was built. He is also the namesake of Wood County, Ohio.

Colonel Eleazer Derby Wood's Monument at West Point

Eleazer Derby Wood (1783 – September 17, 1814) was an American Army officer in the War of 1812.…

The Young Men's Christian Association ("YMCA" or "the Y") was founded on June 6, 1844 in London, England, by George Williams. The original intention of the organization was to put Christian principles into practice, as taught by Jesus Christ. The YMCA idea, which began among evangelicals, was unusual because it crossed the rigid lines that separated all the different churches and social classes in England in those days. The movement extended to the United States in December 1951. The 23rd Street Branch was torn down in 1903.

YMCA, 23rd Street Branch, New York City

The Young Men's Christian Association ("YMCA" or "the Y") was founded on June 6, 1844 in London, England,…