The Ancient Greece ClipArt gallery offers 335 illustration of Greek history, events, and scenes of everyday life. For related images, please see Greek Mythology, Greek Architecture, Greek Ornament, Greek Coins, and the Ancient Greek Musical Instruments ClipArt galleries.

"Bronze figure, originally applied a relief. Found at Tarentum. Apparently in the style of Lysippus." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Bronze Figure

"Bronze figure, originally applied a relief. Found at Tarentum. Apparently in the style of Lysippus."…

"Bronze statuette, from Athens." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Bronze Statuette

"Bronze statuette, from Athens." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"A slave, belonging to the class <em>quasillariae</em>, is presenting her misteress with the <em>calathus</em>, in which the wool is kept for embroidery." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Calathus

"A slave, belonging to the class quasillariae, is presenting her misteress with the calathus,…

"A shoe or boot, anything adapted to cover and preserve the feet in walking. The use of shoes was by no means universal amount the Greeks and Romans. The Homeric heroes are represented without shoes when armed for battle. Socrates, Phocion, and Cato, frequently went barefoot. The Roman slaves had no shoes. the covering of the feet was removed before reclining at meals. People in grief, as for instance at funerals, frequently went barefooted. Shoes may be divided into those in which the mere sole of a shoe was attached to the sole of the foot by ties or bands, or by a covering for the toes or the instep; and those which ascended hgher and higher, according as they covered the ankles, the calf, or the whole of the leg. To calceamenta of the latter kind, i.e. to shoes and boots, as distinguished from sandals and slippers, the term calceus was applied in its proper and restricted sense." &mdash; Smith, 1873; This image shows Calcei, Women's Shoes.

Calceus

"A shoe or boot, anything adapted to cover and preserve the feet in walking. The use of shoes was by…

"A virgin who carried a flat circular basket at sacrifices, in which the chaplet of flowers, the knife to slay the victim, and sometimes the frankincense were deposited. The name, however, was more particularly applied to two virgins of the first Athenian families whowere appointed to officiate as canephori at the Panathenaea. The preceding cut represents the to canephori approaching a candelabrum. Each of hem elevates one arm to support the basket while she slightly raises her tunic with the other." &mdash; Smith, 1873;

Canephoros

"A virgin who carried a flat circular basket at sacrifices, in which the chaplet of flowers, the knife…

She was the mother of Proserpine and according to some phases of the myth of Bachus.

Ceres

She was the mother of Proserpine and according to some phases of the myth of Bachus.

"The thongs or bands of leather, which were tied round the hands of boxers, in order to render their blows more powerful. The cestus was used by boxers in the earliest times, and is mentioned in he Iliad; but in the heroic times it consisted merely of thongs of leather, and differed from the cestos used in later times in the public games, which was a most formidable weapon, being frequently covered with knots and nails, and loaded with lead and iron." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Cestus

"The thongs or bands of leather, which were tied round the hands of boxers, in order to render their…

"Arms and a chariot are here assigned to June through not properly a warlike goddess. The idea itself, of giving such appendages to Diety, seems borrowed from the habits of the heroic age. The following delineation of a chariot is from an ancient one preserved in the Vatican; <em>Hoc regnum dea</em> etc." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Chariot

"Arms and a chariot are here assigned to June through not properly a warlike goddess. The idea itself,…

"In the battles, as depicted by Homer, the chiefs are the only important combatants, while the people are an almost useless mass, frequently put to rout by the prowess of a single hero. The chief is mounted in a war chariot, and stands by the side of his charioteer, who is frequently a friend." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Greek chariot

"In the battles, as depicted by Homer, the chiefs are the only important combatants, while the people…

"The chariot-race." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Chariot-race

"The chariot-race." — Smith, 1882

A tunic garmet usually worn by both men and women among the ancient greeks.

Chiton

A tunic garmet usually worn by both men and women among the ancient greeks.

"The chlamys was a species of cloak or scarf, oblong instead of square, its length being generally about twice its breadth." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Chlamys

"The chlamys was a species of cloak or scarf, oblong instead of square, its length being generally about…

"Marcus Tullius Cicero." &mdash; Quackenbos, 1882

Cicero

"Marcus Tullius Cicero." — Quackenbos, 1882

"A small box or chest, in which anything might be placed, but more particularly applied to the small boxes which were carried in procession in the festivals of Ceres and Bacchus. These boxes, which were always kept closed in the public processions, contained sacred things connected with the worship of these deities. In the representations of Dionysiac processions of ancient vases, women carrying cistae are frequently introduced. The cista was also the name of the ballotbox, into which those who voted in the comitia and in the courts of justice cast their tabellae." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Cista

"A small box or chest, in which anything might be placed, but more particularly applied to the small…

Plan of the Citadel of Mycenae

Citadel

Plan of the Citadel of Mycenae

"The following cut will show specimens of ancient clasps." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Ancient clasps

"The following cut will show specimens of ancient clasps." — Anthon, 1891

"A key. The key was used in very early times, and was probably introduced into Greece from Egypt; although Eustathius states, that in early times all fastenings were made by chains, and that keys were comparatively of a much later invention, which invention he attributes to the Laconians. We have no evidence respecting the materials of which the Greeks made their keys, but among te Romans the larger and coarser sort were made of iron. Those discovered at Pompeii and elsewhere are mostly of bronze. The annexed woodcut represents a key found at Pompeii, the size of which indicated that it was used as a door key." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Clavis

"A key. The key was used in very early times, and was probably introduced into Greece from Egypt; although…

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said to have been first used by Proetus and Acrisius or Argos, and therefore is called clipeus Argolicus, and likened to the sun. But the clipeus is often represented in Roman sculpture of an oblong oval, which makes the distinction between the common buckler and that of Argos." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Clipeus

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said…

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said to have been first used by Proetus and Acrisius or Argos, and therefore is called clipeus Argolicus, and likened to the sun. But the clipeus is often represented in Roman sculpture of an oblong oval, which makes the distinction between the common buckler and that of Argos." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Clipeus

"The large shield worn by the Greeks and Romans, which was originally of the circular form, and is said…

Clisthenes, also known as the Father of Athenian democracy, is depicted competing in a chariot race in the Olympic games.

Clisthenes in the Olympic Games

Clisthenes, also known as the Father of Athenian democracy, is depicted competing in a chariot race…

"Masks used in Comedy" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Comedy Masks

"Masks used in Comedy" — Morey, 1903

An image depicting the city of ancient Corinth.

Ancient Corinth

An image depicting the city of ancient Corinth.

"A wind instrument, anciently made of horn, but afterwards of brass. Like the tuba, it differed from the tibia in being a larger and more powerful instrument, and from the tuba itself, in being curved nearly in the shape of a C, with a cross-piece to steady the instrument for the convenience of the performer. It had no stopples or plugs to adjust the scale to any particular mode; the entire series of notes was produced without keys or holes, by the modification of the breath and of the lips at the mouth-piece. The classicum, which originally meant a signal, rather than the musical instrument which gave the signal, was usually sounded with the cornu." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Cornu

"A wind instrument, anciently made of horn, but afterwards of brass. Like the tuba, it differed from…

"Coryatic Portico of Temple in Acropolic, Athens." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

Coryatic Portico

"Coryatic Portico of Temple in Acropolic, Athens." — Encyclopedia Britanica, 1893

"The <em>cothurnus</em> or buskin, rose above the midddle of the leg so as to surround the calf (<em>sura</em>), and sometimes reached as high as the knees. It was laced in front, and the object in so doing was to make it fit the leg as closely as possible. The skin or leather of which it was made was dyed purple, or of other splendid colours. The cothurnus was worn principally by horsemen, hunters, and men of rank and authority. The accompanying woodcut shows two cothurni, from the statues in the Museo Pio-Clementino. That on the left hand is from a statue of Diana Succincta, that on the right from one of the goddess Roma." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Cothurnus

"The cothurnus or buskin, rose above the midddle of the leg so as to surround the calf (sura),…

"Afterwards [Solon] went to Sardis and made the acquaintance of Cresus. It was on this occasion that the celebrated interview occurred which has been so much repeated for its lesson. Cresus, desiring to make an impression on his visitor, took him into his treasury and showed him his riches."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Cresus Showing Solon His Treasures

"Afterwards [Solon] went to Sardis and made the acquaintance of Cresus. It was on this occasion that…

"Prehistoric Writing from Crete" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Crete Writings

"Prehistoric Writing from Crete" — Morey, 1903

Cup of Sosias, 5th century B.C.

Greek Cuirass

Cup of Sosias, 5th century B.C.

"A knife with only one edge, which formed a straight line. The blade was pointed, and its back curved. It was used for a variety of purposes, but chiefly for killing animals either in the slaughter house, or in hunting, or at the altars of the gods. The priest who conducted a sacrifice never killed the victim himself; but one of his ministri, appointed for that purpose who was called either by the general name minister, or the more specific popa or cltrarius. The annexed woodcut represents the tombstone of a cultrarius, with two cultri upon it." &mdash; Smith, 1873

Culter

"A knife with only one edge, which formed a straight line. The blade was pointed, and its back curved.…

"The preceding cut represents the tombstone of a <em>cultrarius</em>, or the individual who slew the victim at the altar, and upon it two <em>cultri/i>, or sacrificial knives." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Tombstone of a cultrarius

"The preceding cut represents the tombstone of a cultrarius, or the individual who slew the…

"The <em>crater</em> was a vessel in which the wine, according to the custom of the ancients, who very seldom drank it pure, was mixed with water, and from which the cups were filled. The liquid was conveyed from the crater into the drinking-cups by means of a <em>cyathus</em>, or small ladle." &mdash; Anthon, 1891

Cyathus

"The crater was a vessel in which the wine, according to the custom of the ancients, who very…

"A Greek and Roman liquid measure, containing one-twelfth of the sextarius, or .0825 of a pint English. The form of the cyathus used at banquets was that of a small ladle, by means of which the wine was conveyed into the drinking-cups from the large vessel in which it was mixed. Two of these cyathi are represented in this following woodcut." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Cyathus

"A Greek and Roman liquid measure, containing one-twelfth of the sextarius, or .0825 of a pint English.…

Image depicting a mythical moral anecdote, consisting of two morals. The first that regardless of who wears the crown, they are bound to have threats sent their way. The second is that the threat of terrorism is much greater than the act itself.

Banquet of Damocles

Image depicting a mythical moral anecdote, consisting of two morals. The first that regardless of who…

"Here [Darius] was assassinated by Bessus, the satrap of Bactria. He was discovered by Alexander in a dying condition by the roadside. He asked for a cup of water, thanked the giver, and died. And with him died the Empire of the Persians."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Alexander Discovers the Body of Darius

"Here [Darius] was assassinated by Bessus, the satrap of Bactria. He was discovered by Alexander in…

An ancient Greek town. In Greek mythology, the most important oracle resided at Delphi.

Delphi

An ancient Greek town. In Greek mythology, the most important oracle resided at Delphi.

"Diadem from Mycenae" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Diadem

"Diadem from Mycenae" — Morey, 1903

"The Theater of Dionysus (Restoration)" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Dionysus

"The Theater of Dionysus (Restoration)" — Morey, 1903

"Seat of the Priest of Dionysus" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Dionysus Seat

"Seat of the Priest of Dionysus" — Morey, 1903

One of the earliest open-air theaters in Athens, Greece.

Theater of Dionysus

One of the earliest open-air theaters in Athens, Greece.

Also known as Discobolus. The Discus Thrower is a famous, ancient bronze statue that demonstrates a man participating in an ancient sport.

The Discus Thrower

Also known as Discobolus. The Discus Thrower is a famous, ancient bronze statue that demonstrates a…

The evolution of the egg-and-dart motive.

Egg-and-Dart Motive

The evolution of the egg-and-dart motive.

An embroidered housing.

Ephippia

An embroidered housing.

"The building of the new Erechtheum was not commenced till the Parthenon and Propylea were finished, and probably not before the year preceding the breaking out of the Peloponnesian war. Its progress was no doubt delayed by that event, and it was probably not completed before 393 B.C. When finished it presented one of the finest models of the Ionic order, as the Parthenon was of the Doric. It stood to the north of the Acropolis." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Erechtheum restored

"The building of the new Erechtheum was not commenced till the Parthenon and Propylea were finished,…

"The next evolution is presented in Euripides. He is less ideal than his predeccesor, but truer to nature. His drama is more of a reality. He takes his stand in the midst of human life as it is. His language is the language of the people. The heroes of his plays are more possible than those of Sophocles. They are redeemed with weaknesses, touched with folly, stained with tears. He has more variety in his action, greater freedom, more surprises and vicissitudes."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Euripides

"The next evolution is presented in Euripides. He is less ideal than his predeccesor, but truer to nature.…

"View of the Fort Euryalus at Syracuse." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Fort Euryalus

"View of the Fort Euryalus at Syracuse." — Smith, 1882

"It was during the siege of Methone that Philip had the misfortune to lose on of his eyes. A random arrow discharged from the rampart fell square in the king's face and destroyed one-half of his sight. When the arrow-head was drawn away, it was found to contain the following label: "Astor to Philip's right eye." It appeared on inquiry that the unerring missile had been discharged by an offended archer who has recently offered his services to the king and been rejected. He hd represented to Philip that his skill with the bow was great that he could kill a small bird on the wing. The king not believing the story had put off the applicant with the remark, "Well, well, I shall make use of thee when I go to war with the starlings." Astor has then joined the Methoneans and now vindicated his skill in a way never to be forgotten."&mdash;Ridpath, 1885

Astor to Philip's Right Eye

"It was during the siege of Methone that Philip had the misfortune to lose on of his eyes. A random…

"A torch. In the annexed woodcut, the female figure is copied from a fictile vase. The winged figure on the left hand, asleep and leaning on a torch, is from a funeral monument at Rome. The other winged figure represents Cupid as Lethaus Amor. In ancient marbles the torch is sometimes more ornamened than the examples now produced, but it always appears to be formed of wooden staves or twigs, either bound by a rope drawn round them in a spiral form, as in the middle figure blow, or surrounded by circular bands at equal distances, as in the two exterior figures. The inside of the torch may be supposed to have been filled with flax, tow, or other vegetable fibres, the whole being abundantly impregnated with pitch, rosin, wax, oil, and other inflammable substances." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Fax

"A torch. In the annexed woodcut, the female figure is copied from a fictile vase. The winged figure…

"A brooch, consisting of a pin, and of a curved portion furnished with a hook. The curved portion was sometimes a circular ring or disc, the pin passing across its centre and sometimes an arc, the pin being as the chord, of the arc. The forms of brooches, which were commonly of gold or bronze, and more rarely of silver, were, however, as various in ancient as in modern times; for the fibula served in dress not merely as a fastening, but also as an ornament." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Fibula

"A brooch, consisting of a pin, and of a curved portion furnished with a hook. The curved portion was…

"A fire-place; a hearth; a brazier. The fire-place possessed a sacred character, and was dedicated among the Romans to the Lares of each family. Movable hearths, or braziers, properly called foculi, were frequently used." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Focus

"A fire-place; a hearth; a brazier. The fire-place possessed a sacred character, and was dedicated among…

"Two inflated skins, constituting a pair of bellows. The following woodcut is taken from an ancient lamp, and represents a pair of bellows like those we now employ." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Follis

"Two inflated skins, constituting a pair of bellows. The following woodcut is taken from an ancient…

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of union among the various branches of the Greek race, and in keeping alive a feeling of their common origin. They were open to all persons who could prove their Hellenic blood, and were frequented by spectators from all parts of the Grecian world. They were celebrated at Olympia, on the banks of the alpheus, in the territory of Elis." &mdash; Smith, 1882

Foot-race

"The Olympic games were of greater efficacy than the Amphictyonic Council in promoting the spirit of…

"The spindle, was always, when in use, accompanied by the distaff, as an indispensable part of the same apparatus. The wool, flax, or other material, haing been prepared for spinning, was rolled into a ball, which was however, sufficiently loose to allow the fibres to be easily drawn out by the hand of the spinner. The upper part of the distaff was then inserted into this mass of flax or wool, and the lower part was held under the left arm in such a position as was most convenient for conducting the operation. The fibres were drawn out, and at the same time spirally twisted, chiefly by the use of the fore-finger and thumb of the right hand; and the thread so produced was wound upon the spindle until the quantity was as great as it would carry." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Fusus

"The spindle, was always, when in use, accompanied by the distaff, as an indispensable part of the same…

"A helmet; a casque. The helmet was originally made of skin or leather, whence is supposed to have arisen its appellation, meaning properly a helmet of dog-skin, but applied to caps or helmets made of the hide of other animals, and even to those which were entirely of bronze or iron. The five following helmets are selected from antique gems, and are engraved of the size of the originals." &mdash; Smith, 1873.

Galea

"A helmet; a casque. The helmet was originally made of skin or leather, whence is supposed to have arisen…

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." &mdash; Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Gem

"Engraved Gem in the British Museum." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

This illustration shows various types of gladiators, each type with with his specific weapons attributed to him.
Gladiators were swordsmen whose profession was to fight for the public amusement. Gladiators are said to have been borrowed by Rome from the Etruscans. They were first exhibited in Rome in 246 BC, primarily at funerals, but afterwards at festivals, particularly those celebrated by the aediles and other magistrates. More than ten thousand were shown at Trajan's triumph over the Dacians. They were either free-born citizens, usually of a low class, who fought for hire, or captives, slaves, or malefactors, and were kept in schools, where they were carefully trained. Chief varieties were Andabatae, who wore helmets with no openings for the eyes, so that their blindfold movements provoked the spectators' mirth; Mirmillones, who used Gallic weapons, sword and shield; Retiarii, who carried a net and a three-pronged lance -- the net to entangle their opponents; and Thraces, who, like the Thracians, used a short sword and a round buckler. 
When a gladiator was severely wounded and defeated, the people cried out 'Habet' (He has it), and he lowered his arms; then, if the spectators wished his life to be spared, they turned their thumbs down; but it they desired his death, they turned them up. These combats were often attended by great cruelty and callousness on the part of the spectators; sometimes they were fights à outrance, none being spared alive. Discharged gladiators were presented with a rudis, or wooden sword, and hence were called rudiarii. Gladiatorial combats were disliked by the Greeks, and practically never took place in Greek cities.

Gladiators

This illustration shows various types of gladiators, each type with with his specific weapons attributed…

"Gold Intaglios from Mycenae" &mdash; Morey, 1903

Gold Intaglios

"Gold Intaglios from Mycenae" — Morey, 1903