This ClipArt gallery offers 65 illustrations related to the United Kingdom, including landmarks, scenic views, historic events, famous people, and scenes of everyday life.

An armorer, or armourer, was in former times a smith who specialized in manufacturing and repairing arms and armour. In modern usage, the word may also designate a member of a modern military or police force who maintains and repairs small arms, and weapons systems, with some duties resembling those of a civilian gunsmith.

An Armourer

An armorer, or armourer, was in former times a smith who specialized in manufacturing and repairing…

Aust Cliff is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest adjacent to the Severn Estuary, near the village of Aust, South Gloucestershire. Its SSSI designation is due to the presence of fossil beds.

Aust Cliffe, Severn Estuary, Gloucetershire

Aust Cliff is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest adjacent to the Severn Estuary, near…

A book-plate of Sir Nicholas Bacon

Book-plate

A book-plate of Sir Nicholas Bacon

"The case shown is preserved in the Chapter Library, Hertford, England. In some libraries this practice of chaining the books was kept up even in the eighteenth century."—Myers, 1905

Case of Chained Books

"The case shown is preserved in the Chapter Library, Hertford, England. In some libraries this practice…

A king with the earliest bow of the Cremaillere type from the 11th century

Bow

A king with the earliest bow of the Cremaillere type from the 11th century

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England, as a punishment for scolds. It consisted of an iron frame which went over the head of the offender, and had in front an iron plate which was inserted in the mouth, where it was fixed above the tongue, and kept it perfectly quiet." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Brank

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England,…

The old London Bridge.

London Bridge

The old London Bridge.

The new London Bridge.

London Bridge

The new London Bridge.

The London Bridge

London Bridge

The London Bridge

The London New Bridge

London New Bridge

The London New Bridge

Britannia, the personification of Britain, is crowning a kneeling woman while four other women stand behind the kneeling woman. At Britannia's side is her Corinthian helmet and Poseidon's trident. All women are dressed in classical garb. This image was designed by Leonard C Wyon.

Britannia Crowning a Woman

Britannia, the personification of Britain, is crowning a kneeling woman while four other women stand…

"Bronze Lamp in British Museum." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Bronze Lamp

"Bronze Lamp in British Museum." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"Cannon of the time of the restoration." -Foster, 1921

Cannon

"Cannon of the time of the restoration." -Foster, 1921

Block diagram of the cuestas and lowlands of Central England.

Lowlands of Central England

Block diagram of the cuestas and lowlands of Central England.

Charles I and armor-bearer

Charles I and armor-bearer

Charles I and armor-bearer

A name given to a broadsword made to be used with one hand, and closely resembling the cuirassiers's broadsword of the seventeenth century in England.

Claymore

A name given to a broadsword made to be used with one hand, and closely resembling the cuirassiers's…

Section of Corndon Hill, in Shropshire, England; the type of the phacolith.

Corndon Hill

Section of Corndon Hill, in Shropshire, England; the type of the phacolith.

An illustration of the Court of Common Pleas.

Court of Common Pleas

An illustration of the Court of Common Pleas.

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the Conqueror.

Domesday Book

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the…

A range of cliffs that form part of the British coastline facing the Strait of Dover and France. Historically, the cliffs have served as a symbolic guard against any attacks and threats coming in from Continental Europe and the English Channel.

The Cliffs of Dover

A range of cliffs that form part of the British coastline facing the Strait of Dover and France. Historically,…

"The Druidical system was at the height of at the time of the Roman invasion uner Julius Caesar. Against the Druids, as their chief enemies, these conquerors of the world directed their unsparing fury. The Druids, harassed at all points on the mainland, retreated to Anglesey and ona, where for a season they found shelter and continued their now dishonoured rites." —Bulfinch, 1897

Druids

"The Druidical system was at the height of at the time of the Roman invasion uner Julius Caesar. Against…

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which common scolds were formerly tied and plunged into water." -Whitney, 1911

Ducking Stool

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which…

"An apparatus at one time in use in Britain for the punishment of wives. The ducking-stool grew out of the cucking-stool, which was not, as many have supposed, a mere difference of name for the same thing. The cucking-stool of itself did not admit of the ducking of its occupants. It was a simple chair in which the offender was placed, usually before her or his (for the cucking-stool was not so specially for women as the ducking-stool) own door, to be pelted and insulted by the mob." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ducking-Stool

"An apparatus at one time in use in Britain for the punishment of wives. The ducking-stool grew out…

"1. Tumbrel preserved at Leominster; 2. Ducking-chair in the museum at Scarborough." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ducking-Stool

"1. Tumbrel preserved at Leominster; 2. Ducking-chair in the museum at Scarborough." — Chambers'…

A poster with facts and images of England to the Norman Conquest.

England Poster

A poster with facts and images of England to the Norman Conquest.

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized by English law from the fourth to the seventeenth century.

Fugitive Claiming Sanctuary

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized…

"Though not an island, Gibraltar is connected with the Spanish mainland only by a flat strip of sandy ground. The rock, which is about 2 1/2 miles in length, rises to a height of 1400 feet. At the base and on the summit are powerful batteries, while the sides are pierces with loopholes and galleries for cannon. There is also an inclosed harbor in which a fleet can safely anchor. Gibraltar has remained in British hands since 1704."—Webster, 1920.

Gibraltar

"Though not an island, Gibraltar is connected with the Spanish mainland only by a flat strip of sandy…

Glastonbury Tor is a hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. Michael's Tower. Tor is a local word of Celtic origin meaning 'conical hill'. The Tor has a striking location in the middle of a plain called the Summerland Meadows.

The Hills at Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor is a hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. Michael's…

Hadrian's Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of what is now northern England. Construction began in 122 AD.

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of what…

"The hand-gun was used by both infantry and cavalry; it consisted of a simple iron or brass tube with touch-hole at the top, fixed on a straight stock of wood; when used on foot, the soldier held it firmly by passing the stock under the arm; when used on horseback he stock was shortened to butt against the breast, the barrel resting on a fork secured to the saddle bow." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Hand-Gun

"The hand-gun was used by both infantry and cavalry; it consisted of a simple iron or brass tube with…

An island located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently part of the British overseas territory. St. Helena has been used as a place of exile for people like Napoleon I and Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.

The Island of St. Helena

An island located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently part of the British overseas territory.…

The interior of the House of Commons in Parliament during the 1900's. It is pictured packed with representatives. The Commons Chamber was designed to foster adversarial feelings. Benches line the walls and face each other. The ceiling is vaulted and the walls are highly decorated.

The House of Commons Interior in the Early 20th Century

The interior of the House of Commons in Parliament during the 1900's. It is pictured packed with representatives.…

Athelney is located between the villages of Burrowbridge and East Lyng in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset, England. The area is known as the Isle of Athelney, because it was once a very low isolated island in the 'very great swampy and impassable marshes' of the Somerset Levels. Much of the Levels are below sea level. They are now drained for agricultural use during the summer, but are regularly flooded in the winter.

The Isle of Athelney

Athelney is located between the villages of Burrowbridge and East Lyng in the Sedgemoor district of…

"Kew Instruments arranged in the relative positions recommended by Lloyd so as magnetically to interfere with one another as little as possible. We are supposed to be viewing the whole from the south. No. 1 to the right is the declination instrument, No. 2 that for the horizontal force, and No. 3 in the distance behind the central pillar (No. 4) the vertical force magnetometer." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1903

Kew Instruments

"Kew Instruments arranged in the relative positions recommended by Lloyd so as magnetically to interfere…

A knight wearing a suit of armor, presented by the Emperor Maximillian to Henry VIII.

Knight

A knight wearing a suit of armor, presented by the Emperor Maximillian to Henry VIII.

A group of knights on a quest for King Arthur to find Mabon, the son of Modron, who was stolen from his mother when only three nights old.

Knights

A group of knights on a quest for King Arthur to find Mabon, the son of Modron, who was stolen from…

Two knights overlooking the Severn River with Gloucester Castle in the background.

Knights

Two knights overlooking the Severn River with Gloucester Castle in the background.

Illustration of London with a focus on London Bridge as it looked during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. This is a portion of a larger image, a complete Victorian etched 'facsimile' of 'London' created in 1616 by Claes Jansz Visscher. The River Thames is pictured, as is a portion of London. The "Bridge Gate" is labeled, along with several spires from cathedrals, etc. A portion of Southwark Cathedral can be seen in the foreground.

London Bridge as it Looked at the Time of Queen Elizabeth I

Illustration of London with a focus on London Bridge as it looked during the reign of Queen Elizabeth…

Building and duck pond at the London Zoological Gardens, 1845.

London: Zoological Gardens

Building and duck pond at the London Zoological Gardens, 1845.

The town was granted its Market Charter in 1214 by King John and continues to hold a market to this day. In the 14th century religious reformer Canon John Wyclif was Rector in Lutterworth's Parish Church of St. Mary between 1374 and 1384, and it was here that he is traditionally believed to have produced the first ever translation of the Bible from Latin into English. Lutterworth's biblical connections continue as it houses the British Isles headquarters of Gideons International.

Bridge over the Swift, Lutterworth

The town was granted its Market Charter in 1214 by King John and continues to hold a market to this…

Magna Carta Island is an island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Bell Weir Lock. It is in Berkshire (formerly Buckinghamshire) across the river from the water-meadows at Runnymede. The island is one of several contenders for being the place where, in 1215, King John sealed the Magna Carta. Whilst the charter itself indicates Runnymede by name, it is possible the island may have been considered part of Runnymede at the time. It is known that in 1217 the island was the meeting-place of Henry III and Louis (afterwards Louis VIII) of France.

Magna Charta Island

Magna Carta Island is an island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Bell Weir Lock. It…

"The Lord Mayor of London was interrupted in the course of his business at Mansion House, in September, 1820, by a sailor, a showman, and a monkey, ho arrived at the justice-room with a great multitude behind them."

Lord Mayor of London 1820

"The Lord Mayor of London was interrupted in the course of his business at Mansion House, in September,…

Illustrated is the maze on St. Catherine's Hill in Winchester, England. The plant was made in 1710.

Maze

Illustrated is the maze on St. Catherine's Hill in Winchester, England. The plant was made in 1710.

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr. On 20 September 1871 he was murdered on the island of Nukapu in the Solomon Islands, where he had landed alone. Natives killed him as revenge against the abduction of some natives by white men months earlier. His death became a cause celebre in England and increased interest both in missionary work and in improvement of the working conditions in Melanesia. His life is celebrated in the Church of England as a saintly one.

Bishop Patteson's House, Norfolk Island

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr. On…

Pennine chain from the Eden Valley to the River Tees, showing block structure.

Pennine Chain

Pennine chain from the Eden Valley to the River Tees, showing block structure.

Philip sought an alliance with the Kingdom of England, marrying the Catholic Queen Mary I of England in 1554. On occasion of the marriage, he was created King of Chile by his father and received the Kingdom of Naples and the title of a King of Jerusalem, which came with it, from him. Under the terms of the marriage, Philip became King Consort, during the lifetime of his spouse. The marriage was unpopular with her subjects and was a purely political alliance as far as Philip was concerned. On January 16, 1556, Philip succeeded to the throne of Spain, as a result of his father's abdication, but he did not choose to reside i the country until his father's death two years later. After Mary died childless in 1558, Philip showed an interest in marrying her Protestant younger half-sister, Queen Elizabeth I of England, but this plan fell through for a number of reasons.

Philip II

Philip sought an alliance with the Kingdom of England, marrying the Catholic Queen Mary I of England…

Pillory in England

Pillory

Pillory in England

A plague pit is the informal term used to refer to mass graves in which victims of the Black Death were buried. The plague which swept across Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, are estimated to have killed between one-third and two-thirds of Europe's population. Disposal of the bodies of those who died presented huge problems for the authorities, and eventually the normal patterns of burial and funerary observance broke down, usually during the most severe epidemics.

Plague Pits at Finsbury

A plague pit is the informal term used to refer to mass graves in which victims of the Black Death were…

This is a pen drawing of Porlock a coastal village in Somerset, England. The drawing was created by artist Mary Newill.

Porlock

This is a pen drawing of Porlock a coastal village in Somerset, England. The drawing was created by…

Illustrated is protection plating in front of the home of Florence Nightingale. The home is in Lea Hurst, England.

Protection Planting

Illustrated is protection plating in front of the home of Florence Nightingale. The home is in Lea Hurst,…

This illustration shows Queen Elizabeth being carried by her servents.

Queen Elizabeth

This illustration shows Queen Elizabeth being carried by her servents.

Robert's encounter with his father, William the Great, during battle.

Robert

Robert's encounter with his father, William the Great, during battle.

He is sometimes called the Red King, but more commonly William Rufus. Things went worse than ever with the poor English in his time; for at least William the Conqueror had made everybody mind the law, but now William Rufus let his cruel soldiers do just as they pleased, and spoil what they did not want.

William Rufus II

He is sometimes called the Red King, but more commonly William Rufus. Things went worse than ever with…

A small portion of the great, Roman-built Hadrian's Wall in Britain, begun in AD 122. Two men, one sitting and one standing, linger next to a low portion of the wall. Hills and mountains rise in the background.

A Section of Hadrian's Wall in Britain

A small portion of the great, Roman-built Hadrian's Wall in Britain, begun in AD 122. Two men, one sitting…

A Highland sgiath.

Highlands sgiath

A Highland sgiath.

A Celtic shield.

Celtic Shield

A Celtic shield.

Shrine of Etherbert, King of the East Saxons, formerly on the high altar of Hereford cathedral

Shrine of Etherbert

Shrine of Etherbert, King of the East Saxons, formerly on the high altar of Hereford cathedral

Individuals socializing in the court

Socializing

Individuals socializing in the court

A group of Roman soldiers heading into battle.

Roman Soldiers

A group of Roman soldiers heading into battle.

The Star Chamber (Latin Camera stellata) was an English court of law that sat at the royal Palace of Westminster until 1641. It was mistakenly thought that in 1487 an act was passed which established a special "Court of Star Chamber" to deal with the nobles; however; the only legislation passed in that year in this context was to set up a tribunal to prevent the intimidation of juries and to stop retaining. It seems to have gone out of use by 1509 and it had no connection with the later Court of Star Chamber whose primary purpose was to hear political libel and treason cases.

Interior of the Star Chamber

The Star Chamber (Latin Camera stellata) was an English court of law that sat at the royal Palace of…