This ClipArt gallery offers 194 illustrations related to the United Kingdom, including landmarks, scenic views, historic events, famous people, and scenes of everyday life.

"Andre's monument in Westminster Abbey."—Lossing, 1851

Andre's Monument

"Andre's monument in Westminster Abbey."—Lossing, 1851

A monument to mark the spot of the site where the British spy Andre was hanged and buried in 1780.

Monument to Andre

A monument to mark the spot of the site where the British spy Andre was hanged and buried in 1780.

An armorer, or armourer, was in former times a smith who specialized in manufacturing and repairing arms and armour. In modern usage, the word may also designate a member of a modern military or police force who maintains and repairs small arms, and weapons systems, with some duties resembling those of a civilian gunsmith.

An Armourer

An armorer, or armourer, was in former times a smith who specialized in manufacturing and repairing…

The Coat of Arms designated for Canterbury. These Arms predate the break between Rome and the Church of England.

Arms of Canterbury

The Coat of Arms designated for Canterbury. These Arms predate the break between Rome and the Church…

Aust Cliff is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest adjacent to the Severn Estuary, near the village of Aust, South Gloucestershire. Its SSSI designation is due to the presence of fossil beds.

Aust Cliffe, Severn Estuary, Gloucetershire

Aust Cliff is a geological Site of Special Scientific Interest adjacent to the Severn Estuary, near…

"Order of the Bath, in heraldry, etc., an order of knighthood, so called because the recipients of the honor were required formerly to bathe the evening before their creation. It was instituted by Henry IV. in 1399, and, falling into disuse, was revived by George I. in 1725."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Badge, Order of Bath

"Order of the Bath, in heraldry, etc., an order of knighthood, so called because the recipients of the…

Bank of England.

Bank of England

Bank of England.

"Liverpool Branch of the Bank of England." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Bank of England

"Liverpool Branch of the Bank of England." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"The Banqueting House, Whitehall. By Inigo Jones." —D'Anvers, 1895

Banqueting House

"The Banqueting House, Whitehall. By Inigo Jones." —D'Anvers, 1895

"Gate-tower or Barbican, Walmgate Bar, York, England. In medieval fortification, a tower built beside or over a gate, as of a city, etc., for the purpose of defending the passage." -Whitney, 1911

Barbican of Walmgate Bar

"Gate-tower or Barbican, Walmgate Bar, York, England. In medieval fortification, a tower built beside…

He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum (The Ecclesiastical History of the English People) gained him the title "The father of English history". Bede is regarded as a Doctor of the Church by the Roman Catholic Church, a position of theological significance; he is the only man from Great Britain to achieve this designation.

Bede's Tomb, Durham Cathedral

He is well known as an author and scholar, and his most famous work, Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum…

"It was part of the duties of a bellman, or night-watchman, to call out the hours, the state of the weather, and other information as he passed by."—Webster, 1920

A London Bellman

"It was part of the duties of a bellman, or night-watchman, to call out the hours, the state of the…

Within Roman Catholicism, a monk is a member of a religious order who lives a communal life in a monastery, abbey, or priory under a monastic rule of life (such as the Rule of St. Benedict) and under the vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. St. Benedict of Nursia is considered to be the founder of western monasticism. He established the first monastic community in the west and authored the Rule of St. Benedict, which is the foundation for the Order of St. Benedict and all of its reforms such as the Cistercians and the Trappists.

Benedictine Monk

Within Roman Catholicism, a monk is a member of a religious order who lives a communal life in a monastery,…

Benedictine refers to the spirituality and consecrated life in accordance with the Rule of St Benedict, written by Benedict of Nursia in the sixth century.

Benedictine Nun

Benedictine refers to the spirituality and consecrated life in accordance with the Rule of St Benedict,…

The pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical vestments worn by bishops in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Eastern Catholic, Anglican, and some Lutheran churches, in addition to the usual priestly vestments for the celebration of the Mass and the other sacraments.

Costume of a Bishop (12th Century)

The pontifical vestments, also referred to as episcopal vestments or pontificals, are the liturgical…

A book-plate of Sir Nicholas Bacon

Book-plate

A book-plate of Sir Nicholas Bacon

A king with the earliest bow of the Cremaillere type from the 11th century

Bow

A king with the earliest bow of the Cremaillere type from the 11th century

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England, as a punishment for scolds. It consisted of an iron frame which went over the head of the offender, and had in front an iron plate which was inserted in the mouth, where it was fixed above the tongue, and kept it perfectly quiet." — Winston's Encyclopedia, 1919

Brank

"Brank, or Branks, an instrument and formerly used in Scotland, and to some extent also in England,…

The old London Bridge.

London Bridge

The old London Bridge.

The new London Bridge.

London Bridge

The new London Bridge.

The London Bridge

London Bridge

The London Bridge

The London New Bridge

London New Bridge

The London New Bridge

"Part of Park Front of Bridgewater House." — Chambers, 1881

Bridgewater House

"Part of Park Front of Bridgewater House." — Chambers, 1881

Britannia, the personification of Britain, is crowning a kneeling woman while four other women stand behind the kneeling woman. At Britannia's side is her Corinthian helmet and Poseidon's trident. All women are dressed in classical garb. This image was designed by Leonard C Wyon.

Britannia Crowning a Woman

Britannia, the personification of Britain, is crowning a kneeling woman while four other women stand…

"Bronze Lamp in British Museum." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Bronze Lamp

"Bronze Lamp in British Museum." —The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"House in Buckingham Gate, London." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Buckingham Gate

"House in Buckingham Gate, London." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Lord Balfour of Burleigh, in the County of Kinross, is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1607 for Sir Michael Balfour. He was succeeded by his daughter Margaret, the second holder of the title. She married Robert Arnot, who assumed the surname of Balfour in lieu of Arnot, and sat as Lord Balfour of Burleigh in the Scottish Parliament in right of his wife.

Lord Burleigh's Tomb, Stamford

Lord Balfour of Burleigh, in the County of Kinross, is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created…

"All histories of England commence with the invasion of Julius Caesar, the earliest event in that quarter of which we have any authentic account. The Island of Britain was an unknown region to the Romans, and nearly so to the rest of mankind, at the period when Caesar's conquests had reduced the greater part of Gaul to the Roman government. Britain, lying within sight of the northern shores of Gaul, attracted his notice, and he began to meditate schemes of conquest." — Goodrich, 1844

Caesar in England

"All histories of England commence with the invasion of Julius Caesar, the earliest event in that quarter…

"Cannon of the time of the restoration." -Foster, 1921

Cannon

"Cannon of the time of the restoration." -Foster, 1921

Aproach to Canterbury Cathedral.

Mercury Lane

Aproach to Canterbury Cathedral.

Canterbury Cathedral.

Green Court Gate

Canterbury Cathedral.

After the Norman conquest in 1066, Lanfranc (1070-1077) became the first Norman archbishop. He thoroughly rebuilt the ruined Saxon cathedral in a Norman design based strong on the Abbey of St. Etienne in Caen, of which he had previously been abbot. The new cathedral was dedicated in 1077.

Norman Door, Canterbury Cathedral

After the Norman conquest in 1066, Lanfranc (1070-1077) became the first Norman archbishop. He thoroughly…

The remarkable escape and sufferings of Captain Wilson. Captain James Wilson was the first to bring British missionaries to Tahiti in 1797 on the ship Duff.

Escape of Captain Wilson

The remarkable escape and sufferings of Captain Wilson. Captain James Wilson was the first to bring…

Charles I and armor-bearer

Charles I and armor-bearer

Charles I and armor-bearer

"Showing the influence of ancient classical art upon the art of the Renaissance."—Myers, 1905

Tomb at Tours of the Children of Charles VIII

"Showing the influence of ancient classical art upon the art of the Renaissance."—Myers, 1905

Charterhouse, originally Sutton's Hospital in Charterhouse, is a prominent boys independent or public school. Founded by Thomas Sutton in London in 1611 on the site of the old Carthusian monastery in Charterhouse Square, Smithfield, it is one of the original nine English public schools as defined by the Public Schools Act 1868. Today pupils are still referred to as Carthusians, and ex-pupils as Old Carthusians or OCs. It is one of Britain's most expensive schools, with annual boarding and tuition fees per pupil of more than £27,000.

Charterhouse School, 18th Century

Charterhouse, originally Sutton's Hospital in Charterhouse, is a prominent boys independent or public…

"Chatham's monument, Westminster Abbey. William Pitt, the first Earl of Chatham, was born on the 5th of November, 1708."—Lossing, 1851

Chatham's Monument

"Chatham's monument, Westminster Abbey. William Pitt, the first Earl of Chatham, was born on the 5th…

Chaucer's Tomb at Westminster Abbey.

Chaucer's Tomb

Chaucer's Tomb at Westminster Abbey.

"Chelsea Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Chelsea

"Chelsea Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

The Order of Cistercians, sometimes called the White Monks, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed monks. The first Cistercian abbey was founded by Robert of Molesme in 1098, at Cîteaux Abbey near Dijon, France. Two others, Saint Alberic of Citeaux and Saint Stephen Harding, are considered co-founders of the order, and Bernard of Clairvaux is associated with the fast spread of the order during the 12th century.

Cistercian Monk

The Order of Cistercians, sometimes called the White Monks, is a Roman Catholic religious order of enclosed…

A name given to a broadsword made to be used with one hand, and closely resembling the cuirassiers's broadsword of the seventeenth century in England.

Claymore

A name given to a broadsword made to be used with one hand, and closely resembling the cuirassiers's…

"Northampton Institute, Clerkenwell." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Clerkenwell

"Northampton Institute, Clerkenwell." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

"The narrow room in which the House of Commons holds its sessions contains seats for less than 350 of the 707 members. The discomfort in crowding is compensated for by the ease of hearing. The representative sit on benches facing one another across the aisle. The Speaker of the House occupies a chair at the end of the room. On his right are the members of the Ministry; on his left, the Opposition. The Speaker's symbol, the mace, is carried before him when he formally leaves and enters the House, and remains on the table while he occupies the chair."—Webster, 1920

Interior of the House of Commons

"The narrow room in which the House of Commons holds its sessions contains seats for less than 350 of…

A Court Jester during Feudalism of the Middle Ages.

Court Jester

A Court Jester during Feudalism of the Middle Ages.

An illustration of the Court of Common Pleas.

Court of Common Pleas

An illustration of the Court of Common Pleas.

Stuntney is about a mile and a half outside the cathedral city of Ely. Oliver Cromwell lived here for several years after inheriting the position of local tax collector in 1636. His former home dates to the 16th century and is now used by the Tourist Information Office as well as being a museum with rooms displayed as they would have been in Cromwell's time.

The Cromwell House at Stuntney

Stuntney is about a mile and a half outside the cathedral city of Ely. Oliver Cromwell lived here for…

This is the exterior of the Crystal Palace in Great Britain. This building was the site of the Great Exhibition of 1851. Many people are milling about outside.

Crystal Palace

This is the exterior of the Crystal Palace in Great Britain. This building was the site of the Great…

Men and women are standing outside the entrance to the Crystal Palace. Horses and carriages are also outside. At the top of the building is a flag, and there are more flags along the top of either side of the building.

Crystal Palace Entrance

Men and women are standing outside the entrance to the Crystal Palace. Horses and carriages are also…

This is a view of the transept of the Crystal Palace. This large hall contains many trees and has a curved glass ceiling. People are walking around and sitting on benches. Wrought iron fences border some of the trees.

Crystal Palace Hall

This is a view of the transept of the Crystal Palace. This large hall contains many trees and has a…

This is the interior of the Crystal Palace, where many people are gathered. A large fountain is in the hall, as well as a group of trees and bushes. A statue of a woman on a horse is also seen. An elaborate wrought iron gate is shown to the left. The ceiling is made of glass, allowing sunlight to filter in.

Crystal Palace Interior

This is the interior of the Crystal Palace, where many people are gathered. A large fountain is in the…

The main avenue of the Crystal Palace is filled with artistic pieces in the form of statues, busts, tables, lamps and frames, among other things.

Crystal Palace Main

The main avenue of the Crystal Palace is filled with artistic pieces in the form of statues, busts,…

This large hall is full of intricate artifacts, including statues, fountains, tables and timepieces. Many people are milling about.

Crystal Palace Main Avenue

This large hall is full of intricate artifacts, including statues, fountains, tables and timepieces.…

The Medieval Court at the Great Exhibition of 1851 featured many intricately shaped and decorated chandeliers as well as ornate decorative benches and screens.

Crystal Palace Medieval Court

The Medieval Court at the Great Exhibition of 1851 featured many intricately shaped and decorated chandeliers…

A statue of Richard I sits outside the western entrance to the Crystal Palace. People are walking around outside.

Crystal Palace Side View

A statue of Richard I sits outside the western entrance to the Crystal Palace. People are walking around…

HM Prison Dartmoor is located in Princetown, high on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. Its high granite walls dominate this area of the moor.

Dartmoor Prison

HM Prison Dartmoor is located in Princetown, high on Dartmoor in the English county of Devon. Its high…

A seal representing the city of Derby, England.

Derby

A seal representing the city of Derby, England.

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the Conqueror.

Domesday Book

The Domesday or Book of Winchester was a survey or census of England completed in 1086 for William the…

A range of cliffs that form part of the British coastline facing the Strait of Dover and France. Historically, the cliffs have served as a symbolic guard against any attacks and threats coming in from Continental Europe and the English Channel.

The Cliffs of Dover

A range of cliffs that form part of the British coastline facing the Strait of Dover and France. Historically,…

Druid sacrifice

Druid sacrifice

Druid sacrifice

Circles of unwrought upright stones, known as Druidical temples.

Druidical Architecture

Circles of unwrought upright stones, known as Druidical temples.