This ClipArt gallery offers 194 illustrations related to the United Kingdom, including landmarks, scenic views, historic events, famous people, and scenes of everyday life.

Druids

Druids

Druids

"The Druidical system was at the height of at the time of the Roman invasion uner Julius Caesar. Against the Druids, as their chief enemies, these conquerors of the world directed their unsparing fury. The Druids, harassed at all points on the mainland, retreated to Anglesey and ona, where for a season they found shelter and continued their now dishonoured rites." —Bulfinch, 1897

Druids

"The Druidical system was at the height of at the time of the Roman invasion uner Julius Caesar. Against…

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which common scolds were formerly tied and plunged into water." -Whitney, 1911

Ducking Stool

Used as a form of humiliating punishment for angry women, a ducking stool was "a stool or chair in which…

"An apparatus at one time in use in Britain for the punishment of wives. The ducking-stool grew out of the cucking-stool, which was not, as many have supposed, a mere difference of name for the same thing. The cucking-stool of itself did not admit of the ducking of its occupants. It was a simple chair in which the offender was placed, usually before her or his (for the cucking-stool was not so specially for women as the ducking-stool) own door, to be pelted and insulted by the mob." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ducking-Stool

"An apparatus at one time in use in Britain for the punishment of wives. The ducking-stool grew out…

"1. Tumbrel preserved at Leominster; 2. Ducking-chair in the museum at Scarborough." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Ducking-Stool

"1. Tumbrel preserved at Leominster; 2. Ducking-chair in the museum at Scarborough." — Chambers'…

The influence is very much Roman, and this can be seen by looking at the doors and windows of the tower. The tower has a number of functions. At Earls Barton, the ground floor probably served as the main body of the church and would have been annexed by a chancel to the east.

Earls-Barton Saxon Tower

The influence is very much Roman, and this can be seen by looking at the doors and windows of the tower.…

East India House in Leadenhall Street in the City of London in England was the headquarters of the British East India Company. It was rebuilt by the architect Richard Jupp in 1799–1800. Much of India was governed from here until the British government took control of the Company's possessions in India on November 1, 1858. The building was home to the famous ceiling painting, 'The East Offering Its Riches To Britannia', painted by the Italian artist Spiridione Roma in 1778.

The Old East India House

East India House in Leadenhall Street in the City of London in England was the headquarters of the British…

King Edward the Confessor (c. 1003 – 5 January 1066), son of Ethelred the Unready, was the penultimate Anglo-Saxon King of England and the last of the House of Wessex, ruling from 1042 until his death. His reign marked the continuing disintegration of royal power in England and the aggrandizement of the great territorial earls, and it foreshadowed the country's later connection with Normandy.

The Tomb of Edward the Confessor

King Edward the Confessor (c. 1003 – 5 January 1066), son of Ethelred the Unready, was the penultimate…

King Edward's School is an independent secondary school in Birmingham, England, founded by King Edward VI in 1552. It is part of the Foundation of the Schools of King Edward VI in Birmingham and is widely regarded as one of the most academically successful schools in the country according to various league tables. It was ranked 10th for A-Level results and 40th for GCSE results out of all schools in England in 2004.

Edward VI's School at Birmingham

King Edward's School is an independent secondary school in Birmingham, England, founded by King Edward…

Hargrave Hall in England is an example of Elizabethan Architecture of the Renaissance.

Elizabethan Architecture

Hargrave Hall in England is an example of Elizabethan Architecture of the Renaissance.

A poster with facts and images of England to the Norman Conquest.

England Poster

A poster with facts and images of England to the Norman Conquest.

The central bank of the whole of the United Kingdom.

The Bank of England

The central bank of the whole of the United Kingdom.

English farm house

English farm house

English farm house

A rest house for Pilgrim on their way to Canterbury Cathedral.

English Inn

A rest house for Pilgrim on their way to Canterbury Cathedral.

Portions of ancient Hospice on both sides of Water Lane, Ospringe used by Pilgrims on their way to Canterbury Cathedral.

English Inn

Portions of ancient Hospice on both sides of Water Lane, Ospringe used by Pilgrims on their way to Canterbury…

Eton College was founded in 1440 by Henry VI as a charity school to provide free education to seventy poor boys who would then go on to King's College, Cambridge, a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, which he also founded in 1441. This was a copy of William of Wykeham's link between Winchester College and New College, Oxford. Henry VI took half the scholars and the headmaster from William of Wykeham's Winchester College (founded 1382). Eton was modelled on Winchester College, and became popular in the 17th century.

Eton College, Near Windsor

Eton College was founded in 1440 by Henry VI as a charity school to provide free education to seventy…

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized by English law from the fourth to the seventeenth century.

Fugitive Claiming Sanctuary

Sanctuary was also a right to be safe from arrest in the sanctuary of a church or temple, recognized…

The home of Charles Dickens in Gadshill, England.

Gadshill

The home of Charles Dickens in Gadshill, England.

"Though not an island, Gibraltar is connected with the Spanish mainland only by a flat strip of sandy ground. The rock, which is about 2 1/2 miles in length, rises to a height of 1400 feet. At the base and on the summit are powerful batteries, while the sides are pierces with loopholes and galleries for cannon. There is also an inclosed harbor in which a fleet can safely anchor. Gibraltar has remained in British hands since 1704."—Webster, 1920.

Gibraltar

"Though not an island, Gibraltar is connected with the Spanish mainland only by a flat strip of sandy…

Glastonbury Tor is a hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. Michael's Tower. Tor is a local word of Celtic origin meaning 'conical hill'. The Tor has a striking location in the middle of a plain called the Summerland Meadows.

The Hills at Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor is a hill at Glastonbury, Somerset, England, which features the roofless St. Michael's…

Gloucester, a cloister example, found in England. (It is showing the monks' carrels).

Gloucester

Gloucester, a cloister example, found in England. (It is showing the monks' carrels).

The Coat of Arms of Great Britain.

Great Britain Coat of Arms

The Coat of Arms of Great Britain.

Guesten Hall, Winchester, where Pilgrims were lodged on their way to Canterbury.

Guesten Hall

Guesten Hall, Winchester, where Pilgrims were lodged on their way to Canterbury.

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, or the Powder Treason, as it was known at the time, was a failed assassination attempt by a group of provincial English Catholics against King James I of England and VI of Scotland. The plot intended to kill the king, his family, and most of the Protestant aristocracy in a single attack by blowing up the Houses of Parliament during the State Opening on 5 November 1605. The conspirators had also planned to abduct the royal children, not present in Parliament, and incite a popular revolt in the Midlands.

Gunpowder Conspirators' House, Lambeth

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, or the Powder Treason, as it was known at the time, was a failed assassination…

Hadrian's Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of what is now northern England. Construction began in 122 AD.

Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall is a stone and turf fortification built by the Roman Empire across the width of what…

"Halifax Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Halifax

"Halifax Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Many intricate vases, urns and statues are on display in this hall. Several framed pictures dot the walls. The ceiling is ornately decorated and oddly shaped. There are three curtained areas that lead off into other corridors.

The Hall of the Zollverein

Many intricate vases, urns and statues are on display in this hall. Several framed pictures dot the…

Butchers' guild hall in Hereford, England.

Butchers' Guild Hall

Butchers' guild hall in Hereford, England.

Hampden House is a country house in the village of Great Hampden, between Great Missenden and Princes Risborough in Buckinghamshire. It is named after the Hampden family. The Hampdens (later Earls of Buckinghamshire) are recorded as owning the site from before the Norman conquest. They lived continually in the house until 1938.

John Hampden's House, Buckinghamshire

Hampden House is a country house in the village of Great Hampden, between Great Missenden and Princes…

The Hampton court plaza, located in Hampton, England.

Hampton

The Hampton court plaza, located in Hampton, England.

"The hand-gun was used by both infantry and cavalry; it consisted of a simple iron or brass tube with touch-hole at the top, fixed on a straight stock of wood; when used on foot, the soldier held it firmly by passing the stock under the arm; when used on horseback he stock was shortened to butt against the breast, the barrel resting on a fork secured to the saddle bow." — Encyclopedia Britannica, 1893

Hand-Gun

"The hand-gun was used by both infantry and cavalry; it consisted of a simple iron or brass tube with…

Dating back to Saxon times, the village of Hatfield was first known as "Hetfelle" and then became known as "Haethfeld" when around 970 King Edgar gave 5,000 acres to the monastery of Ely. No records remain from this time until 1226 when Henry III granted the Bishops of Ely rights to an annual four-day fair and a weekly market.

Hatfield, Herts

Dating back to Saxon times, the village of Hatfield was first known as "Hetfelle" and then became known…

An island located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently part of the British overseas territory. St. Helena has been used as a place of exile for people like Napoleon I and Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.

The Island of St. Helena

An island located in the southern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently part of the British overseas territory.…

In the year 1189, Henry II died the saddest death, perhaps, that an old man can die, for his sons had brought down his gray hairs with sorrow to the grave.

Henry II's Tomb at Fontevrand

In the year 1189, Henry II died the saddest death, perhaps, that an old man can die, for his sons had…

Known greatly as the king of hearts, or the man of ruthless wonder, Henry was born in Pembroke Castle, Wales, in 1457, Henry VII was the only son of Edmund Tudor and Margaret Beaufort.

Henry VII

Known greatly as the king of hearts, or the man of ruthless wonder, Henry was born in Pembroke Castle,…

This drawing represents the interior of Her Majesty's Theater of England.

Interior of Her Majesty's Theatre

This drawing represents the interior of Her Majesty's Theater of England.

George Herbert (April 3, 1593 – March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. He went to college with the intention of becoming a priest, but his scholarship attracted the attention of King James I. Herbert served in parliament for two years. In 1630, in his late thirties he gave up his secular ambitions and took holy orders in the Church of England, spending the rest of his life as a rector of the little parish of St. Andrew Bemerton, near Salisbury.

George Herbert's Rector House, Bemerton

George Herbert (April 3, 1593 – March 1, 1633) was a Welsh poet, orator and a priest. He went…

Hinchingbrooke House in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, was built around an 11th century nunnery. After the Reformation it passed into the hands of the Cromwell family, and subsequently, became the home of the Earls of Sandwich, including John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, reputedly the "inventor" of the modern sandwich. It was originally given to Thomas Cromwell along with Ramsey Abbey as a reward for overseeing the dissolution of the monasteries.

Hinchingbrooke House

Hinchingbrooke House in Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire, was built around an 11th century nunnery. After…

Hinchingbrooke School was founded as Huntingdon Grammar School in 1565. Among its pupils in its early history were Oliver Cromwell and Samuel Pepys. Hinchingbrooke School is a large school situated on the outskirts of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire. It is a fully comprehensive school with some 1850 pupils on roll, including one of the most popular Sixth Forms in Cambridge (Years 12-13).

Hinchingbrooke School

Hinchingbrooke School was founded as Huntingdon Grammar School in 1565. Among its pupils in its early…

A hotel in London, England.

Hotel

A hotel in London, England.

A hotel located in Bristol, United Kingdom.

Clifton Down Hotel

A hotel located in Bristol, United Kingdom.

The Fortfield Hotel in Sidmouth.

Fortfield Hotel

The Fortfield Hotel in Sidmouth.

The Imperial Hotel in Lynton.

Imperial Hotel

The Imperial Hotel in Lynton.

The Valley of Rocks Hotel in Lynton.

Valley of Rocks Hotel

The Valley of Rocks Hotel in Lynton.

The artist is unknown for the drawing of the childhood home of William Turner. The house on Maiden Lane still stands today.

House in Maiden Lane in which Turner was born

The artist is unknown for the drawing of the childhood home of William Turner. The house on Maiden Lane…

Inside the House of Commons.

House of Commons

Inside the House of Commons.

This is the Plan of Principal Floor of the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, England. Other wise known as Westminster Palace, It is an example of Modern English Architecture. The architect was Sir Charles Barry. Construction lasted from 1836 to 1868. The Houses of Parliament is located on the River Thames. The scale is given in feet. "Barry's great building, the Houses of Parliament, with which his name will always be more especially associated, comes accidentally, though not by natural development nor by his own choice, under the head of the Gothic revival. The style of Tudor Gothic was dictated to the competitors, apparently from a mistaken idea that the building ought to "harmonize" with the architecture of Henry VII.'s chapel adjacent to the site. Had Barry been left to himself, there is no doubt that the Houses of Parliament, with the same main characteristics of plan and grouping, would have been a classic type of detail, and would possibly have been still a finer building than it is; and since the choice of the Gothic style in this case was not a direct consequence of the Gothic revival movement, it may be considered separately from that. The architectural greatness of the building consists, in the first place, in the grand yet simple scheme of Barry's plan, with the octagon hall in the centre, as the meeting-point for the public, the two chambers to north and south, and the access to the committee-rooms and other departments subordinate to the chambers. The plan in itself is a stroke of genius, and had been more or less imitated in buildings for similar purposes all over the world; the most important example, the Parliament House of Budapest, being almost a literal copy of Barry's plan. Thus, as in all great architecture, the plan is the basis of the whole scheme, and upon it is built up a most picturesque and expressive grouping, arising directly out of the plan. The two towers are most happily contrasted as expressive of their differing purposes; the Victoria Tower is the symbol of the State entrance, a piece of architectural display solely for the sake of a grand effect; the Clock Tower is a utilitarian structure, a lofty stalk to carry a great clock high in the air; the two are differentiated accordingly, and the placing of them at opposite ends of the structure has the fortunate effect of indicating, from a distance, the extent of the plan. The graceful spire in the centre offers an effective contrast to the masses of the two towers, while forming the outward architectural expression of the octagonal hall, which is, as it were, the keystone of the plan."

Houses of Parliament, Westminster; Plan of Principal Floor

This is the Plan of Principal Floor of the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, England. Other wise…

The Tabard, an inn that stood on the east side of Borough High Street in Southwark, was established in 1307, when the abbot of Hyde purchased the land to construct a hostel for himself and his brethren, when business took them to London, as well as an inn to accommodate the numerous pilgrims headed on annual pilgrimage to the Shrine of Thomas Beckett in Canterbury Cathedral. The Tabard is famous as the place owned by Harry Bailey, the host in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, and is described in the first few lines of Chaucer's work as the location where the pilgrims first meet on their journey to Canterbury in the 1380s.

Tabard Inn

The Tabard, an inn that stood on the east side of Borough High Street in Southwark, was established…

Athelney is located between the villages of Burrowbridge and East Lyng in the Sedgemoor district of Somerset, England. The area is known as the Isle of Athelney, because it was once a very low isolated island in the 'very great swampy and impassable marshes' of the Somerset Levels. Much of the Levels are below sea level. They are now drained for agricultural use during the summer, but are regularly flooded in the winter.

The Isle of Athelney

Athelney is located between the villages of Burrowbridge and East Lyng in the Sedgemoor district of…

According to Holinshed, it was predicted that Henry IV would die in Jerusalem; Shakespeare's play repeats this. Henry took this to mean that he would die on crusade. In reality, he died at the house of the Abbot of Westminster, in the Jerusalem chamber.

The Jerusalem Chamber

According to Holinshed, it was predicted that Henry IV would die in Jerusalem; Shakespeare's play repeats…

An illustration of King's College located in Aberdeen.

King's College

An illustration of King's College located in Aberdeen.

A knight wearing a suit of armor, presented by the Emperor Maximillian to Henry VIII.

Knight

A knight wearing a suit of armor, presented by the Emperor Maximillian to Henry VIII.

It takes its origins from the Knights Hospitaller, an organization founded in Jerusalem in 1050 as an Amalfitan hospital to provide care for poor and sick pilgrims to the Holy Land. After the conquest of Jerusalem in 1099 during the First Crusade, it became a Catholic military order under its own charter. Following the loss of Christian territory to Islamic conquerors of the Holy Land, the Order operated from Rhodes (1310-1523), and later from Malta (1530-1798), over which it was sovereign.

A Knight of St. John

It takes its origins from the Knights Hospitaller, an organization founded in Jerusalem in 1050 as an…

A group of knights on a quest for King Arthur to find Mabon, the son of Modron, who was stolen from his mother when only three nights old.

Knights

A group of knights on a quest for King Arthur to find Mabon, the son of Modron, who was stolen from…

Two knights overlooking the Severn River with Gloucester Castle in the background.

Knights

Two knights overlooking the Severn River with Gloucester Castle in the background.

"Eddystone is a group of gneiss rocks, daily submerged by the tide, in the English Channel, 9 miles off the Cornish coast, and 14 S.S.W. of Plymouth Breakwater. The frequent shipwrecks on these rocks led to the erection of a lighthouse on them in 1669-1700, but the great storm of Nov. 20, 1703 completely washed it away. Another lighthouse was built in 1706-1709. This was burned in 1755. The next, noted for its strength and the engineering skill displayed in it, was constructed in 1757-1759. The granite was dovetailed into the solid rock, and each block into its neighbors. As the rock in which this tower was built became undermined and greatly weakened by the action of the waves, the foundation of another was laid on a different part of the reef in 1879. Its light is visible in clear weather at a distance of 17 and one half miles."—(Charles Leonard-Stuart, 1911)

Eddystone Lighthouse

"Eddystone is a group of gneiss rocks, daily submerged by the tide, in the English Channel, 9 miles…

"London City and Midland Bank, Ludgate Hill Branch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

London City

"London City and Midland Bank, Ludgate Hill Branch." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

London Exhibition in 1851.

London Exhibition

London Exhibition in 1851.

London, Butcher Row

London, Butcher Row

London, Butcher Row

Building and duck pond at the London Zoological Gardens, 1845.

London: Zoological Gardens

Building and duck pond at the London Zoological Gardens, 1845.