This ClipArt gallery offers 194 illustrations related to the United Kingdom, including landmarks, scenic views, historic events, famous people, and scenes of everyday life.

The town was granted its Market Charter in 1214 by King John and continues to hold a market to this day. In the 14th century religious reformer Canon John Wyclif was Rector in Lutterworth's Parish Church of St. Mary between 1374 and 1384, and it was here that he is traditionally believed to have produced the first ever translation of the Bible from Latin into English. Lutterworth's biblical connections continue as it houses the British Isles headquarters of Gideons International.

Bridge over the Swift, Lutterworth

The town was granted its Market Charter in 1214 by King John and continues to hold a market to this…

Magdalen College was founded as Magdalen Hall in 1448 by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester. It became Magdalen College in 1458. The founder's statutes included provision for a choral foundation of men and boys (a tradition that has continued to the present day) and made reference to the pronunciation of the name of the College in English.

Magdalen College, Oxford

Magdalen College was founded as Magdalen Hall in 1448 by William of Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester.…

Magna Carta Island is an island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Bell Weir Lock. It is in Berkshire (formerly Buckinghamshire) across the river from the water-meadows at Runnymede. The island is one of several contenders for being the place where, in 1215, King John sealed the Magna Carta. Whilst the charter itself indicates Runnymede by name, it is possible the island may have been considered part of Runnymede at the time. It is known that in 1217 the island was the meeting-place of Henry III and Louis (afterwards Louis VIII) of France.

Magna Charta Island

Magna Carta Island is an island in the River Thames in England, on the reach above Bell Weir Lock. It…

"House in Margaret Street, London." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Margaret Street

"House in Margaret Street, London." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

The Martyrs' Memorial is an imposing stone monument positioned at the intersection of St Giles', Magdalen Street and Beaumont Street in Oxford, England just outside Balliol College. It commemorates the 16th-century "Oxford Martyrs". The Oxford Martyrs were tried for heresy in 1555 and subsequently burnt at the stake in Oxford, England, for their religious beliefs and teachings. The three martyrs were the bishops Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley, and the Archbishop Thomas Cranmer.

Martyr's Memorial, Oxford

The Martyrs' Memorial is an imposing stone monument positioned at the intersection of St Giles', Magdalen…

"The Lord Mayor of London was interrupted in the course of his business at Mansion House, in September, 1820, by a sailor, a showman, and a monkey, ho arrived at the justice-room with a great multitude behind them."

Lord Mayor of London 1820

"The Lord Mayor of London was interrupted in the course of his business at Mansion House, in September,…

Illustrated is the maze on St. Catherine's Hill in Winchester, England. The plant was made in 1710.

Maze

Illustrated is the maze on St. Catherine's Hill in Winchester, England. The plant was made in 1710.

Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. The southern gateway is surmounted by a tower of the four Orders, probably inspired by Italian examples that Warden Savile would have seen on his European travels.

Gate of Merton College, Oxford

Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation…

"A granite Corinthian column, 145 feet high, surmounted by a statue of Nelson, 16 feet high. On the pedestal are bronze sculptures, cast with the metal of captured French cannon and representing scenes from Nelson's naval victories. Four colossal lions, modeled by Sir Edwin Landseer, crouch at the base of the monument."—Webster, 1920

The Nelson Monument

"A granite Corinthian column, 145 feet high, surmounted by a statue of Nelson, 16 feet high. On the…

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), from 1935 Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer, author, and statesman who in his lifetime gained a reputation as a leading humanist scholar, and occupied many public offices, including Lord Chancellor (1529–1532), in which he had numerous Protestant Christians burned at the stake. More coined the word "utopia", a name he gave to an ideal, imaginary island nation whose political system he described in the eponymous book published in 1516. He was beheaded in 1535 when he refused to sign the Act of Supremacy that declared Henry VIII Supreme Head of the Church in England.

Sir Thomas More's House, Chelsea

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), from 1935 Saint Thomas More, was an English lawyer,…

"In England, as in Germany, architectural activity has assumed various phases in modern times. With few exceptions, the numerous newly-constructed churches are built in the Gothic style of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries; whilst public secular buildings, for which a certain simplicity is appropriate, such as school and university buildings, asylums, &c., as well as large country-houses, are either constructed in the Pointed or in the Late Gothic, or so-called Perpendicular or Tudor style, with flat-arched, curved, or even horizontal heads to the openings. Other public buildings, as, for instance, the Houses of Parliament, which is the most important modern building in London, are carried out in this style. The Renaissance style has recently been frequently employed, especially for dwelling-houses."The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament, is a complex of buildings in London. It is the seat of the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons). The palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster, close to the government buildings of Whitehall.

New Houses of Parliament, London

"In England, as in Germany, architectural activity has assumed various phases in modern times. With…

Norwich, a cloister example, found in England.

Norwich

Norwich, a cloister example, found in England.

"They had some rude notions of sculpture, and made images out of clay, which they hardened in the fire. They excelled at wicker-work, and their baskets were sent to Rome, where they were very much admired." — Goodrich, 1844

Old Britons

"They had some rude notions of sculpture, and made images out of clay, which they hardened in the fire.…

"Oxford Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

Oxford

"Oxford Town Hall." — The Encyclopedia Britannica, 1910

House of Parliament in England

Parliament

House of Parliament in England

Parliament House

Parliament House

Parliament House

An illustration of a group of Parliament members.

Parliament Members

An illustration of a group of Parliament members.

After a fire in 1834, the present Houses of Parliament were built over the next 30 years. They were the work of the architect Sir Charles Barry (1795–1860) and his assistant Augustus Welby Pugin (1812–52). The design incorporated Westminster Hall and the remains of St Stephen's Chapel. The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet. The palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster, close to other government buildings in Whitehall.

The New Houses of Parliament

After a fire in 1834, the present Houses of Parliament were built over the next 30 years. They were…

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr. On 20 September 1871 he was murdered on the island of Nukapu in the Solomon Islands, where he had landed alone. Natives killed him as revenge against the abduction of some natives by white men months earlier. His death became a cause celebre in England and increased interest both in missionary work and in improvement of the working conditions in Melanesia. His life is celebrated in the Church of England as a saintly one.

Bishop Patteson's House, Norfolk Island

John Coleridge Patteson (April 1, 1827 – September 20, 1871) was an Anglican bishop and martyr.…

Philip sought an alliance with the Kingdom of England, marrying the Catholic Queen Mary I of England in 1554. On occasion of the marriage, he was created King of Chile by his father and received the Kingdom of Naples and the title of a King of Jerusalem, which came with it, from him. Under the terms of the marriage, Philip became King Consort, during the lifetime of his spouse. The marriage was unpopular with her subjects and was a purely political alliance as far as Philip was concerned. On January 16, 1556, Philip succeeded to the throne of Spain, as a result of his father's abdication, but he did not choose to reside i the country until his father's death two years later. After Mary died childless in 1558, Philip showed an interest in marrying her Protestant younger half-sister, Queen Elizabeth I of England, but this plan fell through for a number of reasons.

Philip II

Philip sought an alliance with the Kingdom of England, marrying the Catholic Queen Mary I of England…

Pillory in England

Pillory

Pillory in England

A plague pit is the informal term used to refer to mass graves in which victims of the Black Death were buried. The plague which swept across Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, are estimated to have killed between one-third and two-thirds of Europe's population. Disposal of the bodies of those who died presented huge problems for the authorities, and eventually the normal patterns of burial and funerary observance broke down, usually during the most severe epidemics.

Plague Pits at Finsbury

A plague pit is the informal term used to refer to mass graves in which victims of the Black Death were…

This is a plan of the St Paul's Cathedral in London, England. It is an example of English Renaissance architecture. The construction lasted from 1675 to 1710. Sir Christopher Wren designed the cathedral. "In plan, Wren's design was in accordance with the traditional arrangement of an English cathedral, with nave, north and south transepts and choir, in all the cases with side aisles together...Wren introduced a series of cupolas over the main arms of the cathedral, which enabled him to light with clerestory windows; these are not visible on the exterior, as they are masked by the upper storey which Wren carried round the whole structure, in order, probably, to give it greater height and importance." The scale is given in feet.

Plan of St Paul's Cathedral, London, 1675–1710

This is a plan of the St Paul's Cathedral in London, England. It is an example of English Renaissance…

This is a pen drawing of Porlock a coastal village in Somerset, England. The drawing was created by artist Mary Newill.

Porlock

This is a pen drawing of Porlock a coastal village in Somerset, England. The drawing was created by…

"Prodeo et Ecclesia" translates to "For God and the Church""Regno et Patria" translates roughly to "Kingdom and Fatherland"

Prodeo et Ecclesia

"Prodeo et Ecclesia" translates to "For God and the Church" "Regno et Patria" translates roughly to…

Illustrated is protection plating in front of the home of Florence Nightingale. The home is in Lea Hurst, England.

Protection Planting

Illustrated is protection plating in front of the home of Florence Nightingale. The home is in Lea Hurst,…

This illustration shows Queen Elizabeth being carried by her servents.

Queen Elizabeth

This illustration shows Queen Elizabeth being carried by her servents.

"Queen Elizabeth's Tomb: In the North Aisle of Henry VII's Chapel, Westminster Abbey." — Chambers, 1881

Queen Elizabeth's Tomb

"Queen Elizabeth's Tomb: In the North Aisle of Henry VII's Chapel, Westminster Abbey." — Chambers,…

"One of the many caricatures of the extravagant fashions in headdress of both sexes during the eighteenth century."—Webster, 1920

Ridiculous Taste, or the Ladies' Absurdity

"One of the many caricatures of the extravagant fashions in headdress of both sexes during the eighteenth…

Robert's encounter with his father, William the Great, during battle.

Robert

Robert's encounter with his father, William the Great, during battle.

The New Law Courts, London.The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is the building in London which houses the Court of Appeal of England and Wales and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. The building is a large grey stone edifice in the Victorian Gothic style and was designed by George Edmund Street, a solicitor turned architect. It was built in the 1870s. The Royal Courts of Justice were opened by Queen Victoria in December 1882.

Royal Courts of Justice

The New Law Courts, London. The Royal Courts of Justice, commonly called the Law Courts, is the building…

He is sometimes called the Red King, but more commonly William Rufus. Things went worse than ever with the poor English in his time; for at least William the Conqueror had made everybody mind the law, but now William Rufus let his cruel soldiers do just as they pleased, and spoil what they did not want.

William Rufus II

He is sometimes called the Red King, but more commonly William Rufus. Things went worse than ever with…

Saxon lantern

Saxon lantern

Saxon lantern

"In the eleventh century, the Anglo-Saxons, originally the fiercest nation of the North of Europe, had become changed into a submissive and unwarlike people by the combine influences of luxury, a great landed aristocracy, and a richly endowed hierarchy." — Goodrich, 1844

Saxons

"In the eleventh century, the Anglo-Saxons, originally the fiercest nation of the North of Europe, had…

Coat of Arms, Great Britain and Ireland

The Great Seal of Great Britain and Ireland

Coat of Arms, Great Britain and Ireland

A Highland sgiath.

Highlands sgiath

A Highland sgiath.

The Shaftesbury hotel in Liverpool.

The Shaftesbury

The Shaftesbury hotel in Liverpool.

Shakespeare's birthplace.

William Shakespeare

Shakespeare's birthplace.

The Sheffield Town Hall was officially opened by Queen Victoria in 1897. The architect was Mr. E. W. Mountford.

Sheffield

The Sheffield Town Hall was officially opened by Queen Victoria in 1897. The architect was Mr. E. W.…

A Celtic shield.

Celtic Shield

A Celtic shield.

Shrine of Etherbert, King of the East Saxons, formerly on the high altar of Hereford cathedral

Shrine of Etherbert

Shrine of Etherbert, King of the East Saxons, formerly on the high altar of Hereford cathedral

Individuals socializing in the court

Socializing

Individuals socializing in the court

A group of Roman soldiers heading into battle.

Roman Soldiers

A group of Roman soldiers heading into battle.

The hospital was described as ancient in 1215 and was named after Thomas Becket — which suggests it may have been founded after 1173 when Becket was canonized. However, it is possible it was only renamed in 1173 and that it was founded when St. Mary Overie Priory founded in 1106 in Southwark. At the end of the 17th century, the hospital and church were largely rebuilt by Sir Robert Clayton, president of the hospital and a former Lord Mayor of the City of London. He employed Thomas Cartwright as architect.

St. Thomas's Hospital

The hospital was described as ancient in 1215 and was named after Thomas Becket — which suggests…

The Star Chamber (Latin Camera stellata) was an English court of law that sat at the royal Palace of Westminster until 1641. It was mistakenly thought that in 1487 an act was passed which established a special "Court of Star Chamber" to deal with the nobles; however; the only legislation passed in that year in this context was to set up a tribunal to prevent the intimidation of juries and to stop retaining. It seems to have gone out of use by 1509 and it had no connection with the later Court of Star Chamber whose primary purpose was to hear political libel and treason cases.

Interior of the Star Chamber

The Star Chamber (Latin Camera stellata) was an English court of law that sat at the royal Palace of…

"Star of the Bath." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Star of Bath

"Star of the Bath." — Chambers' Encyclopedia, 1875

Stocks in England

Stocks

Stocks in England

A circular ruin of stones on Salisbury Plain

Stonehenge

A circular ruin of stones on Salisbury Plain

A Neolithic and Bronze Age monument located near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire, about 8 miles northwest of Salisbury.

Stonehenge

A Neolithic and Bronze Age monument located near Amesbury in the English county of Wiltshire, about…

A Neolithic monument located near Amesbury in England.

Stonehenge

A Neolithic monument located near Amesbury in England.

The prehistoric monument of Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England.

Stonehenge

The prehistoric monument of Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England.

"A bit of Stonehenge. The earliest architectural monument in Britain."—Gordy, 1912

Stonehenge

"A bit of Stonehenge. The earliest architectural monument in Britain."—Gordy, 1912

An ancient monument located in England, composed of earthworks surrounding a circular setting of large standing stones.

Stonehenge

An ancient monument located in England, composed of earthworks surrounding a circular setting of large…

Stonehenge is a pre-historic monument located in Wiltshire, England. It is one of the most famous monuments in the world, with large standing stones that are placed in a circular form. It also was a burial site with hundreds of burial mounds.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a pre-historic monument located in Wiltshire, England. It is one of the most famous monuments…

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 3.2 kilometres (2.0 mi) west of Amesbury and 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) north of Salisbury. One of the most famous prehistoric sites in the world, Stonehenge is composed of earthworks surrounding a circular setting of large standing stones.

Ruins at Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located in the English county of Wiltshire, about 3.2 kilometres…

King Charles I signed a death warrant against Thomas Wentworth, the Earl of Strafford, after Parliament condemned him to death for attempting to strengthen the royal position against Parliament.

Execution of the Earl of Strafford

King Charles I signed a death warrant against Thomas Wentworth, the Earl of Strafford, after Parliament…

A type of sword called cleddyo. Usually made of bronze and having a "leaf shape" form. the tounge being one piece with the blade, and the barrel of the hilt being formed by riveting a plate of wood, bone, or horn upon each sde of the tounge.

Sword

A type of sword called cleddyo. Usually made of bronze and having a "leaf shape" form. the tounge being…

Tabard Inn

Tabard Inn

Tabard Inn

"The targe of the Scottish Highlands, composed of wood and leather, and studded with brass decoratively applied, is a reversion to the early circular form."—Finley, 1917

Highland targe

"The targe of the Scottish Highlands, composed of wood and leather, and studded with brass decoratively…

The Tower Bridge in London, England.

Tower Bridge

The Tower Bridge in London, England.